A Hidden Landscape Once a Week

The Unruly Curiosity of the British Music Press from the '60s to the '80s... By Those Who Made It Happen

A Hidden Landscape Once a Week

In its heyday, from the 1960s to the 1980s, the UK music press was the forging ground for a new critical culture, where readers could encounter anything from comics and cult films to new musical forms and radical underground politics. It created an off-mainstream collective cultural commons improvised through a networked subculture of rival weeklies, monthlies, and fanzines, including such titles as NME, Melody Maker, Sounds , Record Mirror, Black Echoes, Black Music, Let It Rock, Street Life, Zigzag, and Smash Hits. This anthology of conversations and essays, memories and commentary explores how this uncharted space first came about, who put it together, what it achieved, and where it went. Along the way, it unearths the many surprising worlds explored by this network of young anarchists, dreamers, and agitators who dared to take pop culture seriously, and considers what remains of their critical legacy. With cover and illustrations by legendary comics artist Savage Pencil.

Alan Moore, Out from the Underground

Cartooning, Performance, and Dissent

Alan Moore, Out from the Underground

This book explores Alan Moore’s career as a cartoonist, as shaped by his transdisciplinary practice as a poet, illustrator, musician and playwright as well as his involvement in the Northampton Arts Lab and the hippie counterculture in which it took place. It traces Moore’s trajectory out from the underground comix scene of the 1970s and into a commercial music press rocked by the arrival of punk. In doing so it uncovers how performance has shaped Moore’s approach to comics and their political potential. Drawing on the work of Bertolt Brecht, who similarly fused political dissent with experimental popular art, this book considers what looking strangely at Alan Moore as cartoonist tells us about comics, their visual and material form, and the performance and politics of their reading and making.

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Rock Music Research

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Rock Music Research

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Rock Music Research is the first comprehensive academic survey of the field of rock music as it stands today. More than 50 years into its life and we still ask - what is rock music, why is it studied, and how does it work, both as music and as cultural activity? This volume draws together 37 of the leading academics working on rock to provide answers to these questions and many more. The text is divided into four major sections: practice of rock (analysis, performance, and recording); theories; business of rock; and social and culture issues. Each chapter combines two approaches, providing a summary of current knowledge of the area concerned as well as the consequences of that research and suggesting profitable subsequent directions to take. This text investigates and presents the field at a level of depth worthy of something which has had such a pervasive influence on the lives of millions.

Windows on a Hidden World

Exploring the Advent landscape

Windows on a Hidden World

As a priest, married to a vicar, with four young children, Jane Maycock is all too familiar with the struggle not to be engulfed by busyness in the run-up to Christmas. As a result, the reflections she has written for this lovely book are engagingly infused with real-life happenings, even as they invite us to stop and consider what Advent itself really means. The author draws on the insights of the biblical authors, poets such as Robert Southwell, and contemporary hymn writers including Timothy Dudley-Smith, to present a series of windows through which we can explore the main ideas surrounding the season. We are taken through the themes of wilderness and of God's choice, and examine the place of conflict and confrontation in Christian faith. We look more deeply at the familiar nativity scene, and at the idea of the second coming. Underpinning Windows on a Hidden World is the conviction that we are bound up in an intimate relationship with a God of love, and these daily readings offer much encouragement to respond to the wonder of God's tender nearness with hope and joy.

Once a Week

Once a Week


The Hidden Places of England

The Hidden Places of England

England's landscape is as diverse as its culture. It is a country with magnificent landscapes. This guide looks at the more established places of interest throughout the country, but it also focuses on the more secluded and little known visitor attractions and places to stay, eat and drink.

The Hidden Places of Ireland

The Hidden Places of Ireland

Often called the Emerald Isle, Ireland is rich in greenery, but there is an abundance of every variety of landscape. This guide focuses on the well-known as well as the more secluded venues for food, accommodation and places of interest in the country.

The Pattern in the Carpet

A Personal History with Jigsaws

The Pattern in the Carpet

This unique blend of memoir and history takes “a multi-layered look at jigsaw puzzles . . . charming [and] fascinating” (Publishers Weekly, starred review). Award-winning author Margaret Drabble weaves her own story into a history of games, in particular jigsaws, which have offered her and many others relief from melancholy and depression. Alongside curious facts and discoveries—for example, that the 1929 stock market crash was followed by a boom in puzzle sales—Drabble introduces us to her beloved Auntie Phyl, and describes childhood visits to the house in Long Bennington on the Great North Road, their first trip to London together, the books they read, and the jigsaws they completed. With penetrating sketches of her parents, siblings, and children, Drabble shares her thoughts on the importance of childhood play, art and writing, aging and memory. And she does so with her customary intelligence, energy, and wit.

Death on the Fourth of July

The Story of a Killing, a Trial, and Hate Crime in America

Death on the Fourth of July

On July 4, 2000, three young Asian American men visiting the small town of Ocean Shores, Washington, were attacked by a group of skinheads in the parking lot of a Texaco station. Threats and slurs gave way to violence and, ultimately, a fatal stabbing. But this tragedy culminated with a twist. A young white man, flaunting a Confederate flag just moments before, was slain by one of his would-be victims. In the ensuing murder trial, a harsh lesson on what it really means to be an American unfolded, exposing the layers of distrust between minorities and whites in rural America and revealing the dirty little secret that haunts many small towns: hate crime. In Death on the Fourth of July, veteran journalist David Neiwert explores the hard questions about hate crimes that few are willing to engage. He shares the stories behind the Ocean Shores case through first-hand interviews, and weaves them through an expert examination of the myths, legal issues, and history surrounding these controversial crimes. Death on the Fourth of July provides the most clear-headed and rational thinking on this loaded issue yet published, all within the context of one compelling real-life tragedy.