Alas, Babylon

Study Guide

Alas, Babylon

Don't want to read the actual book? Tired of reading super long reviews? This new study guide is perfect for you!! This study guide provides a short and concise review guide of Alas Babylon by Pat Frank. The guide includes: · A short summary of the entire novel · The major themes and their relationship to the storyline · A character guide with brief details on each role · Bullet-point chapter reviews that go into more detail than the book summary · A few potential essay topics with possible answers. All of this in-depth study guide is designed to make studying more efficient and fun. Stay tuned for our upcoming updates that will include additional quiz questions, audio guides and more tools that will help you easily learn and prepare for school. Need help or have suggestions for us? Email us at [email protected] and we will get back to you as soon as possible. @TheTotalGroup

Alas, Babylon

Alas, Babylon

"Alas, Babylon." Those fateful words heralded the end. When a nuclear holocaust ravages the United States, a thousand years of civilization are stripped away overnight, and tens of millions of people are killed instantly. But for one small town in Florida, miraculously spared, the struggle is just beginning, as men and women of all backgrounds join together to confront the darkness.

A Study Guide for Pat Frank's Alas

A Study Guide for Pat Frank's Alas

A Study Guide for Pat Frank's "Alas," excerpted from Gale's acclaimed Novels for Students.This concise study guide includes plot summary; character analysis; author biography; study questions; historical context; suggestions for further reading; and much more. For any literature project, trust Novels for Students for all of your research needs.

Race, Ethnicity and Nuclear War

Representations of Nuclear Weapons and Post-apocalyptic Worlds

Race, Ethnicity and Nuclear War

Ranging across fiction and poetry, critical theory and film, comics and speeches, Race, Ethnicity and Nuclear War explores how writers, thinkers, and filmmakers have tackled the question: Are nuclear weapons white? Paul Williams addresses myriad representations of nuclear weapons: the Manhattan Project, the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, nuclear tests across the globe, and the anxiety surrounding the superpowers' devastating arsenals. Ultimately, Williams concludes that many texts act as a reminder that the power enjoyed by the white Western world imperils the whole planet.

The Nightmare Considered

Critical Essays on Nuclear War Literature

The Nightmare Considered

These essays assess the nature of nuclear war literature from a variety of perspectives. Scholars, activists, novelists, poets, and teachers challenge nuclear ideologies and traditional readings of apocalyptic texts. Included: Holocaust literature of the 1950s, Michael Dorris and Louise Erdrich, poetry and nuclear war, Riddley Walker, Fiskadoro, haiku and Hiroshima, Kopit’s End of the World, O’Brien’s The Nuclear Age, and Vonnegut’s cataclysmic novels.

Florida Studies

Selected Papers from the 2012 and 2013 Annual Meetings of the Florida College English Association

Florida Studies

This volume contains a variety of essays about Florida literature and history by scholars from across the state representing every kind of institution of higher learning, from community colleges to small liberal arts institutions to large universities. The essays in the first section, ‘Pedagogy’, focus on the college classroom and the challenges facing institutions of higher learning in Florida. The essays in ‘Old Florida’ explore the state’s varied and unique geographies. The final section, ‘Contemporary Florida’, continues to point to the state’s distinctive sense of place while also locating Florida within larger literary, cultural, and political traditions.

Barefoot in Babylon

The Creation of the Woodstock Music Festival, 1969

Barefoot in Babylon

The perfect gift for music fans and anyone fascianated by Woodstock, Barefoot in Babylon is an in-depth look at the making of 1969’s Woodstock Music Festival—one of Rolling Stone’s “50 Moments That Changed the History of Rock and Roll.” “Mr. Spitz feeds us every riveting detail of the chaos that underscored the festival. It makes for some out-a-sight reading, man.”—The New York Times Book Review Fifty years ago, the Woodstock Music Festival defined a generation. Yet, there was much more than peace and love driving that long weekend the summer of 1969. In Barefoot in Babylon, journalist and New York Times bestselling author Bob Spitz gives readers a behind-the-scenes look at the making of Woodstock, from its inception and the incredible musicians that performed to its scandals and the darker side of the peace movement. With a new introduction, as well as maps, set lists, and a breakdown of all the personalities involved, Barefoot in Babylon is a must-read for anyone who was there—or wishes they were.

Postapocalyptic Fiction and the Social Contract

We'll Not Go Home Again

Postapocalyptic Fiction and the Social Contract

Fictional accounts of the end of the world rarely explore the end of humanity; instead they present the end of what we now know and the opportunity to start over. Postapocalyptic Fiction and the Social Contract: 'We'll Not Go Home Again' contends that postapocalyptic fiction reflects one of our most basic political motivations and uses these fictional accounts to explore the move from the state of nature to civil society through a Hobbesian, a Lockean, and a Rousseauian lens.

The Living Bible

The Living Bible

Celebrating 40 years and over 40 million lives touched, Tyndale is releasing The Living Bible as an eBook. The Living Bible is a paraphrase of the Old and New Testaments. Its purpose is to say as exactly as possible what the writers of the Scriptures meant, and to say it simply, expanding where necessary for a clear understanding by the modern reader.

Evaporating Genres

Essays on Fantastic Literature

Evaporating Genres

In this wide-ranging series of essays, an award-winning science fiction critic explores how the related genres of science fiction, fantasy, and horror evolve, merge, and finally “evaporate” into new and more dynamic forms. Beginning with a discussion of how literary readers “unlearned” how to read the fantastic during the heyday of realistic fiction, Gary K. Wolfe goes on to show how the fantastic reasserted itself in popular genre literature, and how these genres themselves grew increasingly unstable in terms of both narrative form and the worlds they portray. More detailed discussions of how specific contemporary writers have promoted this evolution are followed by a final essay examining how the competing discourses have led toward an emerging synthesis of critical approaches and vocabularies. The essays cover a vast range of authors and texts, and include substantial discussions of very current fiction published within the last few years.