Anarchist Accounting: Accounting Principles for a Participatory Economy

Anarchist Accounting: Accounting Principles for a Participatory Economy

How would an economic system based on libertarian socialist principles actually work in practice? What kind of information would need to be recorded in order to enable democratic participation, efficient decision-making and equitable outcomes? Using the economic model Participatory Economics as a framework, this book proposes a set of accounting principles for an economy comprised of common ownership of productive resources, federations of worker and consumer councils, and democratic planning. Anders Sandström is a trained accountant with a degree from Uppsala University. He is a co-founder of Parecon Sverige, a Participatory Economics advocacy group in Sweden.

OUR FRAGILE WORLD: Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainable Development - Volume II

OUR FRAGILE WORLD: Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainable Development - Volume II

This publication, Our Fragile World: Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainable Development presents perspectives of several important subjects that are covered in greater detail and depth in the Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS). The contributions to the two volumes provide an integrated presentation of knowledge and worldviews related to the state of: Earth's natural resources, social resources, institutional resources, and economic and financial resources. They present the vision and thinking of over 200 authors in support of efforts to solve the complex problems connected with sustainable development, and to secure perennial life support on "The Blue Planet'. These contributions are holistic, informative, forward looking, and will be of interest to a broad readership. This volume presents contributions with focus on the Economic and Institutional Dimensions of Sustainable Development in two sections: KNOWLEDGE, TECHNOLOGY, AND MANAGEMENT (Knowledge; Technology and Management ; Economics; Finance and trade). – POLICY AND INSITUTIONAL IMPLICATIONS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (Policy Issues; Institutional implications; Regional Analysis).

International Business

Theory and Practice

International Business

Electronic Inspection Copy available for instructors here What is international business? How does it differ from local or national business? What are the fundamental challenges and emerging trends in international business? What is the impact of globalization, corporate social responsibility, and the ever expanding use of digital technology on corporate strategies and executive decisions? International Business: Theory and Practice addresses these questions by providing the student with a broad overview of the subject, while guiding readers through the practical issues and context of international business with the use of a range of examples, cases and discussion questions drawn from around the world. Current critical issues in international business are analysed and explored: corporate social responsibility in an era of unprecedented globalization, the rise of the global entrepreneur and the `democratization' of competition worldwide, and applications of technology in a digital economy. Key Features: - Unpacks the complex issues facing both multi-national enterprises (MNE) and international small and medium enterprises (SME) - Contains a full range of learning features including international case studies, explanations of key terms, a glossary, and annotated further reading - A dedicated companion website with material to support both lecturers and students. Visit the Companion Website at www.sagepub.co.uk/menipaz

After Occupy

Economic Democracy for the 21st Century

After Occupy

These days, it is easy to be cynical about democracy. Even though there are more democratic societies now (119 and counting) than ever before, skeptics can point to low turnouts in national elections, the degree to which money corrupts the process, and the difficulties of mass participation in complex systems as just a few reasons why the system is flawed. The Occupy movement in 2011 proved that there is an emphatic dissatisfaction with the current state of affairs, particularly with the economy, but, ultimately, it failed to produce any coherent vision for social change. So what should progressives be working toward? What should the economic vision be for the 21st century? After Occupy boldly argues that democracy should not just be a feature of political institutions, but of economic institutions as well. In fact, despite the importance of the economy in democratic societies, there is very little about it that is democratic. Questioning whether the lack of democracy in the economy might be unjust, Tom Malleson scrutinizes workplaces, the market, and financial and investment institutions to consider the pros and cons of democratizing each. He considers examples of successful efforts toward economic democracy enacted across the globe, from worker cooperatives in Spain to credit unions and participatory budgeting measures in Brazil and questions the feasibility of expanding each. The book offers the first comprehensive and radical vision for democracy in the economy, but it is far from utopian. Ultimately, After Occupy offers possibility, demonstrating in a remarkably tangible way that when political democracy evolves to include economic democracy, our societies will have a chance of meaningful equality for all.

World Social Forum

Challenging Empires

World Social Forum

Experimenting with politics that can cope with uncertainty.

Markets, Planning, and Democracy

Essays After the Collapse of Communism

Markets, Planning, and Democracy

'. . . for a reader who is interested in East Europe's socio-political changes the book makes fascinating reading, although it tells very little about the reality of these countries over the past decade. . . Prychitko's essays are actually rather historical: they are a good introduction to the waves of economic thinking that shaped the world in the twentieth century. This historical relevance may actually be the most important aspect of this book.' - Henri Vogt, Democratization the essays contained herein span over a decade and reflect David Prychitko's thinking about the role of the market system, and its relation to planning and democratic processes. the collection consists of previously published and unpublished articles written not only for economists but also for an interdisciplinary audience.

From Marx to Mises

Post Capitalist Society and the Challenge of Ecomic Calculation

From Marx to Mises

In 1920, Ludwig von Mises proclaimed that all attempts to establish socialism would come to grief, for reasons of informational efficiency. At first, socialists and economists took Mises's argument seriously, but by the end of the Second World War, a consensus prevailed that Mises had been discredited. More recently, that consensus has been rapidly reversed: it is now widely agreed that 'Mises was right'. Yet the momentous implications of the Mises argument - for economics, politics, culture, and philosophy - remain largely unexplored. From Marx to Mises is a clear, penetrating exposition of the economic calculation debate, and a scrutiny of some of the broader issues it raises.