Biocapital

The Constitution of Postgenomic Life

Biocapital

DIVAn ethnography about the work of genome scientists, entrepreneurs, and policy makers in biotech drug development in the United States and India./div

Handbook of the Sociology of Health, Illness, and Healing

A Blueprint for the 21st Century

Handbook of the Sociology of Health, Illness, and Healing

The Handbook of the Sociology of Health, Illness & Healing advances the understanding of medical sociology by identifying the most important contemporary challenges to the field and suggesting directions for future inquiry. The editors provide a blueprint for guiding research and teaching agendas for the first quarter of the 21st century. In a series of essays, this volume offers a systematic view of the critical questions that face our understanding of the role of social forces in health, illness and healing. It also provides an overall theoretical framework and asks medical sociologists to consider the implications of taking on new directions and approaches. Such issues may include the importance of multiple levels of influences, the utility of dynamic, life course approaches, the role of culture, the impact of social networks, the importance of fundamental causes approaches, and the influences of state structures and policy making.

Biomedicalization

Technoscience, Health, and Illness in the U.S.

Biomedicalization

The rise of Western scientific medicine fully established the medical sector of the U.S. political economy by the end of the Second World War, the first “social transformation of American medicine.” Then, in an ongoing process called medicalization, the jurisdiction of medicine began expanding, redefining certain areas once deemed moral, social, or legal problems (such as alcoholism, drug addiction, and obesity) as medical problems. The editors of this important collection argue that since the mid-1980s, dramatic, and especially technoscientific, changes in the constitution, organization, and practices of contemporary biomedicine have coalesced into biomedicalization, the second major transformation of American medicine. This volume offers in-depth analyses and case studies along with the groundbreaking essay in which the editors first elaborated their theory of biomedicalization. Contributors. Natalie Boero, Adele E. Clarke, Jennifer R. Fishman, Jennifer Ruth Fosket, Kelly Joyce, Jonathan Kahn, Laura Mamo, Jackie Orr, Elianne Riska, Janet K. Shim, Sara Shostak

Venturing into the Bioeconomy

Professions, innovation, identity

Venturing into the Bioeconomy

This book reports empirical material from three case studies in the pharmaceutical industry, the biotechnology industry and the domain of academic research. New technoscientific frameworks that have not yet translated into new therapies, in the future, may play a more central role in the late-modern society.

Culturing Bioscience

A Case Study in the Anthropology of Science

Culturing Bioscience

Charting the rise and fall of an experimental biomedical facility at a North American university, Culturing Bioscience offers a fascinating glimpse into scientific culture and the social and political context in which that culture operates. Krautwurst nests the discussion of scientific culture within a series of levels from the lab to the global political economy. In the process he explores a number of topics, including: the social impact of technology; researchers' relationships with sophisticated equipment; what scientists actually do in a laboratory; what role science plays in the contemporary university; and the way bioscience interacts with local, regional, and global governments. The result is a rich case study that illustrates a host of contemporary issues in the social study of science.

Life Support

Biocapital and the New History of Outsourced Labor

Life Support

From call centers, overseas domestic labor, and customer care to human organ selling, gestational surrogacy, and knowledge work, such as software programming, life itself is channeled across the globe from one population to another. In Life Support, Kalindi Vora demonstrates how biological bodies have become a new kind of global biocapital. Vora examines how forms of labor serve to support life in the United States at the expense of the lives of people in India. She exposes the ways in which even seemingly inalienable aspects of human life such as care, love, and trust—as well as biological bodies and organs—are not only commodifiable entities but also components essential to contemporary capitalism. As with earlier modes of accumulation, this new global economy has come to rely on the reproduction of life for expansion. Human bodies and subjects are playing a role similar to that of land and natural resource dispossession in the period of capitalist growth during European territorial colonialism. Indeed, the rapid pace at which scientific knowledge of biology and genetics has accelerated has opened up the human body as an extended site for annexation, harvest, dispossession, and production.

Education in the Age of Biocapitalism

Optimizing Educational Life for a Flat World

Education in the Age of Biocapitalism

"This book is an in-depth examination of the growing alignment between powerful global bioindustries and education reform in the U.S. Utilizing a biopolitical methodology, the book focuses on how value-added measures and other neoliberal strategies embedded in policies such as 'race to the top' are involving schools in a project to manage and regulate educational life for competing in a new 'flat world'. Understanding the educational present, this work argues, requires individuals to consider what advanced industrialized nations across the globe are viewing as the future. Biocapitalist development in areas such as genetic engineering, drug therapies, and cellular cloning is the promissory future driving nations like the U.S. to out-compete and out-educate one another at any cost. This book assesses the implications for education in the biocapitalist era and points to alternative futures not based on such a vision of life and its productive potential"--

Me Medicine vs. We Medicine

Reclaiming Biotechnology for the Common Good

Me Medicine vs. We Medicine

Personalized healthcare—or what the award-winning author Donna Dickenson calls "Me Medicine"—is radically transforming our longstanding "one-size-fits-all" model. Technologies such as direct-to-consumer genetic testing, pharmacogenetically developed therapies in cancer care, private umbilical cord blood banking, and neurocognitive enhancement claim to cater to an individual's specific biological character, and, in some cases, these technologies have shown powerful potential. Yet in others they have produced negligible or even negative results. Whatever is behind the rise of Me Medicine, it isn't just science. So why is Me Medicine rapidly edging out We Medicine, and how has our commitment to our collective health suffered as a result? In her cogent, provocative analysis, Dickenson examines the economic and political factors fueling the Me Medicine phenomenon and explores how, over time, this paradigm shift in how we approach our health might damage our individual and collective well-being. Historically, the measures of "We Medicine," such as vaccination and investment in public-health infrastructure, have radically extended our life spans, and Dickenson argues we've lost sight of that truth in our enthusiasm for "Me Medicine." Dickenson explores how personalized medicine illustrates capitalism's protean capacity for creating new products and markets where none existed before—and how this, rather than scientific plausibility, goes a long way toward explaining private umbilical cord blood banks and retail genetics. Drawing on the latest findings from leading scientists, social scientists, and political analysts, she critically examines four possible hypotheses driving our Me Medicine moment: a growing sense of threat; a wave of patient narcissism; corporate interests driving new niche markets; and the dominance of personal choice as a cultural value. She concludes with insights from political theory that emphasize a conception of the commons and the steps we can take to restore its value to modern biotechnology.

The Pharmaceutical Studies Reader

The Pharmaceutical Studies Reader

The Pharmaceutical Studies Reader is an engaging survey of the field that brings together provocative, multi-disciplinary scholarship examining the interplay of medical science, clinical practice, consumerism, and the healthcare marketplace. Draws on anthropological, historical, and sociological approaches to explore the social life of pharmaceuticals with special emphasis on their production, circulation, and consumption Covers topics such as the role of drugs in shaping taxonomies of disease, the evolution of prescribing habits, ethical dimensions of pharmaceuticals, clinical trials, and drug research and marketing in the age of globalization Offers a compelling, contextually-rich treatment of the topic that exposes readers to a variety of approaches, ideas, and frameworks Provides an accessible introduction for readers with no previous background in this area

Suturing New Medical Histories of Africa

Suturing New Medical Histories of Africa

'Suturing' suggests closing a wound, making an incision, editing a film, or stitching together parts, locations, and points of view. The word is a helpful one for today's historians of disease, suffering, and medical practice in Africa. Whether focusing on a hospital or shrine, on malaria, trauma, witchcraft, or nursing, historians are grappling in new ways with the problems of joining locations and viewpoints, of tethering pasts with the present. New challenges arise when thinking about Africa's place in today's world of global health and biosecurity, war zones and heritage monies, emerging medical markets and self-treatment devices. Suturing points to new kinds of creativity with sources, evidence, and interactivity. As new digital capacities transform how history is engaged and produced, the word suturing helps to draw attention to the question of audiences and publics for African medical histories in the 21st century, as demonstrated in this book. (Series: Carl Schlettwein Lectures - Vol. 7)