Bitter Money

Cultural Economy and Some African Meanings of Forbidden Commodities

Bitter Money

"fascinating little book adds to the study of culture to political economy" MacGaffey Journal of Anthropological Research "presents fascinating material on beliefs about money in some Luo-speaking communities of Kenya... an insightful analysis... a case that will generate fruitful discussions for years to come" Ferguson American Ethnologist BITTER MONEY unites symbolic and economic analysis in exploring the beliefs about forbidden exchanges among the Luo of Kenya and other African peoples. Shipton's multi-paradigmatic theoretical explanation briefly summarizes a century of anthropological thought about African exchange, while integrating ways of understanding rural African economy, politics, and culture.

Property Rights and Governance in Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining

Critical Approaches

Property Rights and Governance in Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining

Disputes and dispossession of property rights in the mining sector are causes of injustice, violence, and forced resettlement around the world. This comprehensive volume examines mining, particularly what is often called ‘Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining’, from a perspective of governance and rights. It focuses on rights to land, natural resources, and other forms of material ‘property’. Many projects, policies, and laws targeting artisanal and small-scale mining are embedded in problematic conceptual and institutional frameworks that implicitly stigmatise and discipline artisanal and small-scale miners. This collection takes a critical look at notions of property to destabilise some of these frameworks. The chapters in this book are notable for their recognition of the agency of artisanal miners and ‘local communities’ within the uneven hierarchies in which they are embedded, and their acknowledgement of the difficulties of state regulation of such a complex set of issues. The authors use a variety of theoretical tools, engaging with political economy, political ecology, classical economic theory, and socio-cultural concepts derived from ethnographic methods. This book includes insightful case studies from Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Mongolia, South Africa, and Zambia, and is an important resource for academics, development practitioners, and policy-makers. It was originally published online as a special issue of Third World Thematics.

Money and Credit

A Sociological Approach

Money and Credit

This book offers a fresh and uniquely sociological perspective on money and credit. As basic economic institutions, money and credit are easy to overlook when they work well. When they malfunction, as they did in the new millennium’s global financial crisis, their importance becomes obvious and demands further investigation. Bruce Carruthers and Laura Ariovich examine the social dimensions of money and credit at both the individual and corporate levels, from the development of personal credit and a consumer society, to the role of government in the creation of money. In clear prose, they illustrate how the overall future of the economy is governed by the financial system and the flow of capital into, and out of, firms operating in particular industrial sectors, as well as the social meanings money itself acquires and the ways people distinguish between “dirty” and “clean” money. This accessible and engaging book will be essential reading for upper-level students of economic sociology, and those interested in how the bills, coins and plastic in our pockets shape the world we live in.

Celtic Tales 7

Celtic Tales 7

Who doesn't long for a little adventure in his or her life? These short stories bring you in touch with Celtic people as they charge through life. Join the boy whose best weapon was a soup ladle. Find out where the name Mongol originated. Be in France during the French Revolution and in many other places and time periods. One thing Celts do not do is give up. Whatever the situation, whatever the time period, these people grab the nearest weapon and charge right into danger. It is in their blood. You might think you have outmaneuvered them today, and even tomorrow, but sooner or later they will get what they want out of life. Join them in their adventures; go back in time for a little while and connect with those who came before.

Archaeologies of Colonialism

Consumption, Entanglement, and Violence in Ancient Mediterranean France

Archaeologies of Colonialism

This book presents a theoretically informed, up-to-date study of interactions between indigenous peoples of Mediterranean France and Etruscan, Greek, and Roman colonists during the first millennium BC. Analyzing archaeological data and ancient texts, Michael Dietler explores these colonial encounters over six centuries, focusing on material culture, urban landscapes, economic practices, and forms of violence. He shows how selective consumption linked native societies and colonists and created transformative relationships for each. Archaeologies of Colonialism also examines the role these ancient encounters played in the formation of modern European identity, colonial ideology, and practices, enumerating the problems for archaeologists attempting to re-examine these past societies.

America's Bitter Pill

Money, Politics, Backroom Deals, and the Fight to Fix Our Broken Healthcare System

America's Bitter Pill

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK • America’s Bitter Pill is Steven Brill’s acclaimed book on how the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was written, how it is being implemented, and, most important, how it is changing—and failing to change—the rampant abuses in the healthcare industry. It’s a fly-on-the-wall account of the titanic fight to pass a 961-page law aimed at fixing America’s largest, most dysfunctional industry. It’s a penetrating chronicle of how the profiteering that Brill first identified in his trailblazing Time magazine cover story continues, despite Obamacare. And it is the first complete, inside account of how President Obama persevered to push through the law, but then failed to deal with the staff incompetence and turf wars that crippled its implementation. But by chance America’s Bitter Pill ends up being much more—because as Brill was completing this book, he had to undergo urgent open-heart surgery. Thus, this also becomes the story of how one patient who thinks he knows everything about healthcare “policy” rethinks it from a hospital gurney—and combines that insight with his brilliant reporting. The result: a surprising new vision of how we can fix American healthcare so that it stops draining the bank accounts of our families and our businesses, and the federal treasury. Praise for America’s Bitter Pill “A tour de force . . . a comprehensive and suitably furious guide to the political landscape of American healthcare . . . persuasive, shocking.”—The New York Times “An energetic, picaresque, narrative explanation of much of what has happened in the last seven years of health policy . . . [Brill] has pulled off something extraordinary.”—The New York Times Book Review “A thunderous indictment of what Brill refers to as the ‘toxicity of our profiteer-dominated healthcare system.’ ”—Los Angeles Times “A sweeping and spirited new book [that] chronicles the surprisingly juicy tale of reform.”—The Daily Beast “One of the most important books of our time.”—Walter Isaacson “Superb . . . Brill has achieved the seemingly impossible—written an exciting book about the American health system.”—The New York Review of Books From the Hardcover edition.

Uncertain Tastes

Memory, Ambivalence, and the Politics of Eating in Samburu, Northern Kenya

Uncertain Tastes

This richly drawn ethnography of Samburu cattle herders in northern Kenya examines the effects of an epochal shift in their basic diet-from a regimen of milk, meat, and blood to one of purchased agricultural products. In his innovative analysis, Jon Holtzman uses food as a way to contextualize and measure the profound changes occurring in Samburu social and material life. He shows that if Samburu reaction to the new foods is primarily negative—they are referred to disparagingly as "gray food" and "government food"—it is also deeply ambivalent. For example, the Samburu attribute a host of social maladies to these dietary changes, including selfishness and moral decay. Yet because the new foods save lives during famines, the same individuals also talk of the triumph of reason over an antiquated culture and speak enthusiastically of a better life where there is less struggle to find food. Through detailed analysis of a range of food-centered arenas, Uncertain Tastes argues that the experience of food itself—symbolic, sensuous, social, and material-is intrinsically characterized by multiple and frequently conflicting layers.

Don't Be Bitter, Get Better and Make Money

How to Heal from Your Heartbreak and Get Your Life Back on Track

Don't Be Bitter, Get Better and Make Money

We all have that one guy that we just can't seem to let go. You know he is terrible for you and finally he broke your heart to the point of no return. People always say "you should leave him" but never tell you how to move on after you leave him. Far beyond the traditional "breakup" book, Don't Be Bitter, Get Better & Make Money is the ultimate guide that will empower you to let him go once and for all and become a sexy independent woman after a breakup that turned your life upside down, kept you stuck in a rut and left you at rock bottom.From learning how to win the breakup, loving yourself like never before, overcoming the adversities as a single mother, and setting a solid foundation for you and your future, This book is an electrifying way that will show you how to move forward, upgrade your life and attract TRUE love. For the single mother who thought it was hopeless after being played or a young girl who is determined not to fall onto the wrong path with boys This book will create a lifestyle movement for anyone yearning to rebuild and live a fulfilling, fearless and fabulous life. There is no other book like it.