Bullets, Brothels, & Blood

The Tragic & True Stories of the Infamous, Scandalous, & Murderous Wonch & Leppard Families

Bullets, Brothels, & Blood

A Shooting. Poison. Prostitution. Schizophrenia. Starvation. Mysterious fires. Corpses buried in the snow. A blind man hanged. Multiple investigations, inquests, and trials. The Leppard and Wonch families were plagued by misfortune, tragedy, and scandal, mostly of their own making. Living in abject poverty and destitution, the two families found themselves connected through love, sorrow, and blood.'Bullets, Brothels, & Blood' is a true crime expos� covering over five decades in the lives of these two intertwined families living in Ontario during the 19th and early 20th century.

Blood, Bullets And Bodies

Sexual Politics Below Jamaica’s Poverty Line

Blood, Bullets And Bodies

Fifth Edition The true story of Blood, Bullets and Bodies: a critical multimedia exposé about the factors subverting the political will to act in the best interest of the poor, even when explicit just cause exists for such altruistic action to take place… Blood, Bullets and Bodies is a strange and paradoxical story that needs to be read as much as it needs to be told. It is a riveting story of sex, violence, political intrigue and survival by any means necessary. The book is a literary mirror that provides a revealing and frightening reflection for a self-destructing society to see itself profiled in the throes of its own possible demise. Sure to stir controversy, the new book contains a compelling rendition of the historical circumstances that have made crime and violence – bullets, blood and dead bodies – the number one problem in late 20th and early 21st century Jamaica. Despite the historic One Love Peace Concert and the Peace Truce in 1978, young gunmen seem to have gone wild ever since. Using a variety of sophisticated methodological tools including literary sources, oral interviews, ethnographic studies and the lyrics of popular Reggae songs, Imani Tafari-Ama details the influences and implications of this violent social discourse for everyday performances of femininity and masculinity in Kingston’s inner-city environment as well as in the wider Jamaican society. Tafari-Ama’s stated objective in publishing her thesis as a book is to separate fact from fiction in order to find real and enduring solutions that will reduce the distressing flood of blood, bullets and bodies that is overflowing the streets of Kingston. She hopes that by highlighting some of the facts and exposing much of the fiction about life below the poverty line, her provocative book will be a catalyst in motivating the political and community willpower necessary to find and implement the real-time solutions that she proposes in her suggested Options for Development.

Blood, Bullets, and Buckskin

Blood, Bullets, and Buckskin

In this new series from a "writer of extraordinary originality" (Robert Olen Butler), Marshal Matt Dillon keeps Dodge City safe from rustlers, gamblers, and desperados-and rejoins Doc Adams, Kitty Russell, and all the cherished characters from the classic TV series.

Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls

Prostitution in Colorado, 1860-1930

Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls

Prostitution thrived in pioneer Colorado. Mining was the principal occupation and men outnumbered women more than twenty to one. Jan MacKell provides a detailed overview of the business between 1860 and 1930, focusing her research on the mining towns of Cripple Creek, Salida, Colorado City, and similar boomtown communities. She used census data, Sanborn maps, city directories, property records, marriage records, and court records to document and trace the movements of the women over the course of their careers, uncovering work histories, medical problems, and numerous relocations from town to town. She traces many to their graves, through years filled with abuse, disease, narcotics, and violence. MacKell has unearthed numerous colorful and often touching stories, like that of the boy raised in a brothel who was invited to play with a neighbor's children and replied, "No, my mother is a whore and says I am to stay at home." "Delicacy, humor, respect, and compassion are among the merits of this book. Although other authors have flirted with Colorado's commercial sex, Jan MacKell provides a detailed overview. She has been researching these elusive women for the last fifteen years. Such persistence allows her to offer rich detail on shady ladies who rarely used their real names or even stuck with the same professional name for long."--Thomas J. Noel, from the Introduction

Blood Evidence

Blood Evidence

While investigating the abduction/kidnapping of a marine captain's teenage daughter, Will Coburn and his team of NCIS agents discover a link to a high-profile murder that took place more than seventeen years ago. As the team investigates, they discover a trail of lies, betrayal, and a political cover-up. Forensics specialist Nita Tomlinson will need a faith deeper than she can imagine as she struggles with the past and a family that she can no longer ignore.

A Bloody Business

A Bloody Business

The real story, unvarnished and uncensored, of the Mob’s rise to power during Prohibition ON THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF PROHIBITION, LEARN WHAT REALLY HAPPENED. In 1919, the National Prohibition Act was passed, making it illegal across America to produce, distribute, or sell liquor. With this act, the U.S. Congress also created organized crime as we know it. Italian, Jewish, and Irish mobs sprang up to supply the suddenly illegal commodity to the millions of people still eager to drink it. Men like Lucky Luciano and Meyer Lansky, Dutch Schultz and Bugsy Siegel, Al Capone in Chicago and Nucky Johnson in Atlantic City, waged a brutal war for power in the streets and on the waterfronts. But if you think you already know this story...think again, since you’ve never seen it through the eyes of one of the mobsters who lived it. Called “one of the most significant organized crime figures in the United States” by the U.S. District Attorney, Vincent “Jimmy Blue Eyes” Alo was just 15 years old when Prohibition became law. Over the next decade, Alo would work side by side with Lansky and Luciano as they navigated the brutal underworld of bootlegging, thievery and murder. Alo’s later career included prison time and the ultimate Mob tribute: being immortalized as “Johnny Ola” in The Godfather, Part II. Introduced to the 91-year-old Alo living in retirement in Florida, Dylan Struzan based this book on more than 50 hours of recorded testimony—stories Alo had never shared, and that he forbid her to publish until “after I’m gone.” Alo died, peacefully, two months short of his 97th birthday. And now his stories—bracing and violent, full of intrigue and betrayal, hunger and hubris—can finally be told. “Dylan Struzan has delivered a soaring treat for those of us who love mobster history, a sprawling saga drawn not from rumor or recycled myth, but directly from the horse’s mouth. Her exploration of mob life and the shadow empires the bootleggers built is an exhilarating rush, a must-read.” - FRANK DARABONT, director of THE GREEN MILE and THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION

The Chinatown War

Chinese Los Angeles and the Massacre of 1871

The Chinatown War

In October 1871, a simmering, small-scale turf war involving three Chinese gangs exploded into a riot that engulfed the small but growing town of Los Angeles. A large mob of white Angelenos, spurred by racial resentment, rampaged through the city and lynched some 18 people before order was restored. In The Chinatown War, Scott Zesch offers a compelling account of this little-known event, which ranks among the worst hate crimes in American history. The story begins in the 1850s, when the first wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in Los Angeles in the wake of the 1849 California gold rush. Upon arrival, these immigrants usually took up low-wage jobs, settled in the slum neighborhood of the Calle de los Negros, and joined one of a number of Chinese community associations. Though such associations provided job placement and other services to their members, they were also involved in extortion and illicit businesses, including prostitution. In 1870 the largest of these, the See-Yup Company, imploded in an acrimonious division. The violent succession battle that ensued, as well as the highly publicized torture of Chinese prostitute Sing-Ye, eventually provided the spark for the racially motivated riot that ripped through L.A. Zesch vividly evokes the figures and events in the See-Yup dispute, deftly situates the riot within its historical and political context, and illuminates the workings of the early Chinese-American community in Los Angeles, while simultaneously exploring issues that continue to trouble Americans today. Engaging and deeply researched, The Chinatown War above all delivers a riveting story of a dominant American city and the darker side of its early days that offers powerful insights for our own time.

Red Light Women of the Rocky Mountains

Red Light Women of the Rocky Mountains

Throughout the development of the American West, prostitution grew and flourished within the mining camps, small towns, and cities of the nineteenth-century Rocky Mountains. Whether escaping a bad home life, lured by false advertising, or seeking to subsidize their income, thousands of women chose or were forced to enter an industry where they faced segregation and persecution, fines and jailing, and battled the hazards of disease, drug addiction, physical abuse, pregnancy, and abortion. They dreamed of escape through marriage or retirement, but more often found relief only in death. An integral part of western history, the stories of these women continue to fascinate readers and captivate the minds of historians today. Expanding on the research she did for Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls (UNM Press), historian Jan MacKell moves beyond the mining towns of Colorado to explore the history of prostitution in the Rocky Mountain states of Arizona, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. Each state had its share of working girls and madams like Big Nose Kate or Calamity Jane who remain celebrities in the annals of history, but MacKell also includes the stories of lesser-known women whose role in this illicit trade nonetheless shaped our understanding of the American West.

The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

More than twenty thousand quotations from every era and location are combined in a comprehensive reference that also encompasses details of the earliest traceable source, birth and death dates, and career briefs for each entry, as well as a thematic and k

The Promise of the New South

Life After Reconstruction - 15th Anniversary Edition

The Promise of the New South

At a public picnic in the South in the 1890s, a young man paid five cents for his first chance to hear the revolutionary Edison talking machine. He eagerly listened as the soundman placed the needle down, only to find that through the tubes he held to his ears came the chilling sounds of a lynching. In this story, with its blend of new technology and old hatreds, genteel picnics and mob violence, Edward Ayers captures the history of the South in the years between Reconstruction and the turn of the century. Ranging from the Georgia coast to the Tennessee mountains, from the power brokers to tenant farmers, Ayers depicts a land of startling contrasts. Ayers takes us from remote Southern towns, revolutionized by the spread of the railroads, to the statehouses where Democratic Redeemers swept away the legacy of Reconstruction; from the small farmers, trapped into growing nothing but cotton, to the new industries of Birmingham; from abuse and intimacy in the family to tumultuous public meetings of the prohibitionists. He explores every aspect of society, politics, and the economy, detailing the importance of each in the emerging New South. Central to the entire story is the role of race relations, from alliances and friendships between blacks and whites to the spread of Jim Crows laws and disfranchisement. The teeming nineteenth-century South comes to life in these pages. When this book first appeared in 1992, it won a broad array of prizes and was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. The citation for the National Book Award declared Promise of the New South a vivid and masterfully detailed picture of the evolution of a new society. The Atlantic called it "one of the broadest and most original interpretations of southern history of the past twenty years.