By the Ore Docks

A Working People's History of Duluth

By the Ore Docks

Located on the shore of Lake Superior near the Iron Range of Minnesota and, for much of its history, the site of vast steel, lumber, and shipping industries, Duluth has been home to people who worked tirelessly in the rail yards, grain elevators, and harbor. Here, for the first time, By the Ore Docks presents a compelling, full-length history of the people who built this port city and struggled for both the growth of the city and the rights of their fellow workers. In By the Ore Docks, Richard Hudelson and Carl Ross trace seventy years in the lives of Duluth’s multi-ethnic working class—Scandinavians, Finns, Italians, Poles, Irish, Jews, and African Americans—and chronicle, along with the events of the times, the city’s vibrant neighborhoods, religious traditions, and communities. But they also tell the dramatic story of how a populist worker’s coalition challenged the “legitimate American” business interests of the city, including the major corporation U.S. Steel. From the Knights of Labor in the 1880s to the Industrial Workers of the World, the AFL and CIO, and the Democratic Farmer-Labor party, radical organizations and their immigrant visionaries put Duluth on the national map as a center in the fight for worker’s rights—a struggle inflamed by major strikes in the copper and iron mines. By the Ore Docks is at once an important history of Duluth and a story of its working people, common laborers as well as union activists like Ernie Pearson, journalist Irene Paull, and Communist party gubernatorial candidate Sam Davis. Hudelson and Ross reveal tension between Duluth’s ethnic groups, while also highlighting the ability of the people to overcome those differences and shape the legacy of the city’s unsettled and remarkable past. Richard Hudelson is professor of philosophy at the University of Wisconsin, Superior. He is the author of, among other works, Marxism and Philosophy in the Twentieth Century and The Rise and Fall of Communism. Carl Ross (1913–2004) was a labor activist and the author of The Finn Factor in American Labor, Culture, and Society. He was director of the Twentieth-Century Radicalism in Minnesota Project of the Minnesota Historical Society.

Classic Railroads You Can Model

Classic Railroads You Can Model

A compilation of the editor's favorite HO and N scale track plans from two popular out-of-print books, Railroads You Can Model and More Railroads You Can Model.

Fairport Harbor

Fairport Harbor

Surrounded by water on three sides, Fairport Harbor, Ohio, was once a gateway to the Western Reserve, welcoming more ships to its shores than Cleveland. These ships brought immigrants-Irish, English, and others-who saw the harbor's towering 1825 lighthouse, one of the town's two lighthouses on the National Registry of Historic Sites, as a beacon for freedom, hope, and opportunity. Indeed, the town served a prominent role in the Underground Railroad, helping southern slaves along their way to freedom in Canada. Ship building and Great Lakes shipping became the major industries, and soon homes, warehouses, and businesses began to flourish-Fairport Harbor was booming. Fairport Harbor tells the story of the village's rich history with captivating vintage photographs that capture all the natural beauty of this lakeside community. Featured inside are the historic landmarks-buildings, churches, and of course lighthouses that are so identifiable with the village's past. Also featured are the people-the fishermen, shipbuilders, and railroad workers who all helped build one of the most picturesque harbor towns on all of Lake Erie's shores.

Iron Ore Transport on the Great Lakes

The Development of a Delivery System to Feed American Industry

Iron Ore Transport on the Great Lakes

The availability of inexpensive steel, so crucial to the United States’ emergence as a leading industrial power in the late nineteenth century, relied upon the rise of an ore transport system on the Great Lakes that would feed American industry as a whole and come to alter the face of the region. This detailed history recounts innovations in shipping, the improvement of channels and harbors, the creation of locks, technical advances in loading and unloading equipment, and the ability to attract capital and government support to fund the various projects. When government support was lacking, reinterpretations of the Constitution were introduced to justify federal involvement. These changes, which often functioned symbiotically, represent one of the key untold stories in the spectacular rise of American industry.

The Missabe Road

The Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway

The Missabe Road

"The Missabe Road tells the complete story of the DM&IR: its construction, early operation, line extensions, passenger service, rolling stock, steam locomotives, and today's modern diesels. Frank A. King examines underground and open pit mining operations, modern-day taconite mining, the handling and transportation of ore to the docks, and the loading of boats."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Great Lakes Ore Docks and Ore Cars

Great Lakes Ore Docks and Ore Cars

The Iron Mining Industry was quite extensive throughout the area known as the Lake Superior Iron Ore District. All of the iron ore was transported by rail to a wide number of lake ports on Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. This book lists all of the ore docks constructed on The Great Lakes. Includes photos of the ore docks and ore cars, ore car schematics and pertinent data.

Ashtabula

People and Places

Ashtabula

Post-World War II Ashtabula was a major Great Lakes port with a thriving downtown. Local photographer Richard E. Stoner began taking photographs of the growing city in 1938, and for the next 58 years, his lens captured Ashtabula’s businesses, industries, and citizens. His commercial accounts ranged from the harbor’s Pinney Dock and Transport Company, to Main Avenue’s locally-owned Carlisle-Allen Company department store, to Ashtabula’s major war industries. Dick Stoner’s earlier photographs capture the Ashtabula that once was, including the week-long Sesquicentennial Celebration of 1953. His later photos record the beginnings of fundamental change in our way of life. Also included in this volume are some pre-1930s photographs by Vinton N. Herron, whose work Stoner purchased when Herron retired. For Ashtabulans, this is a family album. For others, it is a look at a bygone time in Midwest America.

Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway

Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway

This illustrated look at the history the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railroad begins with a brief look back at its late-nineteenth-century origins in the Duluth & Iron Range and Duluth, Missabe & Northern railroads. The bulk of the book, however, covers the period from 1937-when those two roads merged under U.S. Steel-to today. Along the way, readers will learn about and witness the road's legendary early steam power, the evolution of its unique mining operations, its switch to diesel power in the 1950s, and its modern fleet and operations. About the AuthorJeff Lemke is the advertising director for RailModel Journal magazine. His photography has been featured TRAINS, Model Railroader, and RailModel Journal. He lives in Bloomingdale, Illinois.Hardcover - 8-1/4" x 10-5/8" - 160 pp - 125 color, 75 b/w