City Power

Urban Governance in a Global Age

City Power

In 2013, Detroit filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in US history. That dubious honor marked the end of a long decline, during which city leaders slashed municipal costs and desperately sought to attract private investment. That same year, an economically resurgent New York City elected a progressive mayor intent on reducing income inequality and spurring more equitable economic development. Whether or not Mayor Bill de Blasio realizes his legislative vision, his agenda raises a fundamental question: can American cities govern, or are they powerless in the face of global capital? Conventional economic wisdom asserts that cities cannot do very much. Conventional political wisdom asserts that cities should not do very much. In City Power, Richard Schragger challenges both these claims, arguing that cities can govern, but only if we let them. In the past decade, city leaders across America have raised the minimum wage, expanded social services, put conditions on incoming development, and otherwise engaged in social welfare redistribution. These cities have not suffered from capital flight - in fact, many are experiencing an economic renaissance. Schragger argues that the range of city policies is not limited by the requirements of capital, but instead by a constitutional structure that serves the interests of state and federal officials. Maintaining weak cities is a political choice. City Power shows how cities can govern despite constitutional limitations - and why we should want them to. In an era of global capital, municipal power is more relevant than ever to citizen well-being. A dynamic vision of city politics for the new urban age, City Power demonstrates that the city should be at the very center of our economic, legal, and political thinking.

The Growth of a City

Power and Politics in Portland, Oregon, 1915-1950

The Growth of a City


City

A Guidebook for the Urban Age

City

For the first time in the history of our planet, more than half the population-3.3 billion people-is now living in cities. City is the ultimate guidebook to our urban centers-the signature unit of human civilization. With erudite prose and carefully chosen illustrations, this unique work of metatourism explores what cities are and how they work. It covers history, customs and language, districts, transport, money, work, shops and markets, and tourist sites, creating a fantastically detailed portrait of the city through history and into the future. The urban explorer will revel in essays on downtowns, suburbs, shantytowns and favelas, graffiti, skylines, crime, the theater, street food, sport, eco-cities, and sacred sites, as well as mini essays on the Tower of Babel, flash mobs, ghettos, skateboarding, and SimCity, among many others. Drawing on a vast range of examples from across the world and throughout history, City is extensively illustrated with full-color photographs, maps, and other images. Acclaimed author and independent scholar P. D. Smith explores what it was like to live in the first cities, how they have evolved, and why in the future, cities will play an even greater role in human life.

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants, (1994)

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants, (1994)

Presents an annual summary of statistics at the national, Census division, State, electric utility, & plant levels regarding the quantity, quality, & cost of fossil fuels used to produce electricity. Over 100 charts, tables & maps.

Inventory of New York City Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Inventory of New York City Greenhouse Gas Emissions

This report is a comprehensive greenhouse gas inventory for both New York City as a whole & for City gov¿t. operations. While there is no substitute for fed. action, all levels of gov¿t. have a role to play in confronting climate change & its potential impacts, & this report will help N.Y. begin doing that more aggressively. Mayor Bloomberg created the Mayor¿s Office of Long-term Planning & Sustainability & charged it with developing a comprehensive sustainability plan for the City¿s future. The result is PlaNYC, which has set a goal of reducing missions by 30% below 2005 levels by 2030, an ambitious but achievable goal. This greenhouse gas inventory is a critical first step in reducing N.Y.¿s contribution to global carbon dioxide levels. Illustrations.

City Bound

How States Stifle Urban Innovation

City Bound

Many major American cities are defying the conventional wisdom that suburbs are the communities of the future. But as these urban centers prosper, they increasingly confront significant constraints. In City Bound, Gerald E. Frug and David J. Barron address these limits in a new way. Based on a study of the differing legal structures of Boston, New York, Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, San Francisco, and Seattle, City Bound explores how state law determines what cities can and cannot do to raise revenue, control land use, and improve city schools. Frug and Barron show that state law can make it much easier for cities to pursue a global-city or a tourist-city agenda than to respond to the needs of middle-class residents or to pursue regional alliances. But they also explain that state law is often so outdated, and so rooted in an unjustified distrust of local decision making, that the legal process makes it hard for successful cities to develop and implement any coherent vision of their future. Their book calls not for local autonomy but for a new structure of state-local relations that would enable cities to take the lead in charting the future course of urban development. It should be of interest to everyone who cares about the future of American cities, whether political scientists, planners, architects, lawyers, or simply citizens.

Power and Politics in the City

Brisbane in Transition

Power and Politics in the City

This study of community power in Brisbane analyses the challenges posed by growth and the shifting of the balance of power from the country to the city. Consists of a series of case studies focusing on discrete policy issues and key areas, and exploring topics such as relations between state and city governments and between public and private sectors, and their impact on the Brisbane community. Caulfield is a lecturer in public administration at the University of Queensland, and Wanna is a senior lecturer in politics and public policy at Griffith University.