Counterexamples in Topology

Counterexamples in Topology

Over 140 examples, preceded by a succinct exposition of general topology and basic terminology. Each example treated as a whole. Numerous problems and exercises correlated with examples. 1978 edition. Bibliography.

Geometric Aspects of General Topology

Geometric Aspects of General Topology

This book is designed for graduate students to acquire knowledge of dimension theory, ANR theory (theory of retracts), and related topics. These two theories are connected with various fields in geometric topology and in general topology as well. Hence, for students who wish to research subjects in general and geometric topology, understanding these theories will be valuable. Many proofs are illustrated by figures or diagrams, making it easier to understand the ideas of those proofs. Although exercises as such are not included, some results are given with only a sketch of their proofs. Completing the proofs in detail provides good exercise and training for graduate students and will be useful in graduate classes or seminars. Researchers should also find this book very helpful, because it contains many subjects that are not presented in usual textbooks, e.g., dim X × I = dim X + 1 for a metrizable space X; the difference between the small and large inductive dimensions; a hereditarily infinite-dimensional space; the ANR-ness of locally contractible countable-dimensional metrizable spaces; an infinite-dimensional space with finite cohomological dimension; a dimension raising cell-like map; and a non-AR metric linear space. The final chapter enables students to understand how deeply related the two theories are. Simplicial complexes are very useful in topology and are indispensable for studying the theories of both dimension and ANRs. There are many textbooks from which some knowledge of these subjects can be obtained, but no textbook discusses non-locally finite simplicial complexes in detail. So, when we encounter them, we have to refer to the original papers. For instance, J.H.C. Whitehead's theorem on small subdivisions is very important, but its proof cannot be found in any textbook. The homotopy type of simplicial complexes is discussed in textbooks on algebraic topology using CW complexes, but geometrical arguments using simplicial complexes are rather easy.

Undergraduate Topology

A Working Textbook

Undergraduate Topology

This textbook offers an accessible, modern introduction at undergraduate level to an area known variously as general topology, point-set topology or analytic topology with a particular focus on helping students to build theory for themselves. It is the result of several years of the authors' combined university teaching experience stimulated by sustained interest in advanced mathematical thinking and learning, alongside established research careers in analytic topology. Point-set topology is a discipline that needs relatively little background knowledge, but sufficient determination to grasp ideas precisely and to argue with straight and careful logic. Research and long experience in undergraduate mathematics education suggests that an optimal way to learn such a subject is to teach it to yourself, pro-actively, by guided reading of brief skeleton notes and by doing your own spadework to fill in the details and to flesh out the examples. This text will facilitate such an approach for those learners who opt to do it this way and for those instructors who would like to encourage this so-called 'Moore approach', even for a modest segment of the teaching term or for part of the class. In reality, most students simply do not have the combination of time, background and motivation needed to implement such a plan fully. The accessibility, flexibility and completeness of this text enable it to be used equally effectively for more conventional instructor-led courses. Critically, it furnishes a rich variety of exercises and examples, many of which have specimen solutions, through which to gain in confidence and competence.

Topological Signal Processing

Topological Signal Processing

Signal processing is the discipline of extracting information from collections of measurements. To be effective, the measurements must be organized and then filtered, detected, or transformed to expose the desired information. Distortions caused by uncertainty, noise, and clutter degrade the performance of practical signal processing systems. In aggressively uncertain situations, the full truth about an underlying signal cannot be known. This book develops the theory and practice of signal processing systems for these situations that extract useful, qualitative information using the mathematics of topology -- the study of spaces under continuous transformations. Since the collection of continuous transformations is large and varied, tools which are topologically-motivated are automatically insensitive to substantial distortion. The target audience comprises practitioners as well as researchers, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

Counterexamples in Analysis

Counterexamples in Analysis

These counterexamples deal mostly with the part of analysis known as "real variables." Covers the real number system, functions and limits, differentiation, Riemann integration, sequences, infinite series, functions of 2 variables, plane sets, more. 1962 edition.

Elements of Abstract Analysis

Elements of Abstract Analysis

While there are many books on functional analysis, Elements of Abstract Analysis takes a very different approach. Unlike other books, it provides a comprehensive overview of the elementary concepts of analysis while preparing students to cross the threshold of functional analysis. The book is written specifically for final-year undergraduate students who should already be familiar with most of the mathematical structures discussed. It reviews the concepts at a slightly greater level of abstraction and enables students to understand their place within the broad framework of set-based mathematics. The book has been clearly written and contains numerous exercises and examples, making it an a rigorous and self-contained introductory text on functional analysis.

An Introduction to Lebesgue Integration and Fourier Series

An Introduction to Lebesgue Integration and Fourier Series

This book arose out of the authors' desire to present Lebesgue integration and Fourier series on an undergraduate level, since most undergraduate texts do not cover this material or do so in a cursory way. The result is a clear, concise, well-organized introduction to such topics as the Riemann integral, measurable sets, properties of measurable sets, measurable functions, the Lebesgue integral, convergence and the Lebesgue integral, pointwise convergence of Fourier series and other subjects. The authors not only cover these topics in a useful and thorough way, they have taken pains to motivate the student by keeping the goals of the theory always in sight, justifying each step of the development in terms of those goals. In addition, whenever possible, new concepts are related to concepts already in the student's repertoire. Finally, to enable readers to test their grasp of the material, the text is supplemented by numerous examples and exercises. Mathematics students as well as students of engineering and science will find here a superb treatment, carefully thought out and well presented , that is ideal for a one semester course. The only prerequisite is a basic knowledge of advanced calculus, including the notions of compactness, continuity, uniform convergence and Riemann integration.