Co-Illusion

Co-Illusion

Reports from America's political crisis, exposing a new "iconopolitics," in which words and images lose their connection to reality. The political crisis that sneaked up on America--the rise of Trump and Trumpism--has revealed the rot at the core of American exceptionalism. Recent changes in the way words and images are produced and received have made the current surreality possible; communication through social media, by design, maximizes attention and minimizes scrutiny. In Co-Illusion, the noted writer on art, photography, and politics David Levi Strauss bears witness to the new "iconopolitics" in which words and images lose their connection to reality. The collusion that fueled Trump's rise was the secret agreement of voters and media consumers--their "co-illusion"--to set aside the social contract. Strauss offers dispatches from the epicenter of our constitutional earthquake, writing first from the 2016 Democratic and Republican conventions and then from the campaign. After the election, he switches gears, writing in the voices of the regime and of those complicit in its actions--from the thoughts of the President himself ("I am not a mistake. I am not a fluke, or a bug in the system. I am the System") to the reflections of a nameless billionaire tech CEO whose initials may or may not be M. Z. Finally, Strauss shows us how we might repair the damage to the public imaginary after Trump exits the scene. Photographs by celebrated documentary photographers Susan Meiselas and Peter van Agtmael accompany the texts.

Between the Eyes

Essays on Photography and Politics

Between the Eyes

A collection of poetic writings on photography and its practitioners considers such topics as the imagery of dreams, the statements and revelations of key photographers, and the media activities surrounding September 11.

Photography and Belief

Photography and Belief

In this exploration of contemporary photography, David Levi Strauss questions the concept that “seeing is believing” Identifying a recent shift in the dominance of photography, David Levi Strauss looks at the power of the medium in the age of Photoshop, smart phones, and the internet, asking important questions about how we look and what we trust. In the first ekphrasis title on photography, Strauss challenges the aura of believability and highlights the potential dangers around this status. He examines how images produced on cameras gradually gained an inordinate power to influence public opinion, prompt action, comfort and assuage, and direct or even create desire. How and why do we believe technical images the way we do? Offering a poignant argument in the era of “fake news,” Strauss draws attention to new changes in the technology of seeing. Some uses of "technical images" are causing the connection between images and belief (between seeing and believing) to fray and pull apart. How is this shifting our relationship to images? Will this crisis in what we can believe come to threaten our very purchase on the real? This book is an inquiry into the history and future of our belief in images

Between Dog and Wolf

Between Dog and Wolf

In these fierce and lyrical essays, David Levi Strauss calls for an art--and implicitly for an approach to art writing--that is passionately experiential, intellectually grounded, and politically fearless. He addresses the always conflicted relation between aesthetics and politics by concentrating on specific instances--from allopathic art to Desert Storm propaganda, from Columbus's legacy to Robert Smithson's prophesies, and from new art in post-Soviet Russia to public art in the United States--and by focusing on the work of artists as various as Grünewald, Jean Genet, Cindy Sherman, Joseph Beuys and Andy Warhol, Jean-Luc Godard and Anne-Marie Miéville, Carolee Schneemann, Andrei Monastyrsky, and Daniel Joseph Martinez.

Manoeuvres

Poems 1977-1979

Manoeuvres


La Mirada: Catalogue

La Mirada: Catalogue

La Mirada (the gaze) presents nine outside their country almost unknown Latin American artist-photographers. The works of the last 20 years range from straight photography to the staged image. This title describes not only gaze of the camera directed towards a specific subject, but also the artistic attitude and mental approach of the nine artists and their diverse views on photography.

Art Guys

Art Guys

The Art Guys (Michael Galbreth and Jack Massing) who met at the University of Houston in 1982, have carefully crafted a presence and wacky notoriety that places them at the heart of the Houston art scene and has captured the attention of a national audience. Driven by an insatiable curiosity, they employ a variety of media for the exploration of their ideas including drawing, painting, sculpture, installation, performance and video. The Art Guys create diverse works designed to engage, amuse and challenge viewers by seducing them with a playful sense of humor. Described in the New York Times as "a cross between Dada, David Letterman, John Cage and the Smothers Brothers", [1] The Art Guys present a blend of performance, conceptual and visual art that explores the absurdities of contemporary life. All told, The Art Guys defy categorization, they represent a kink in the art historical continuum - a hiccup, a scratch that can't be itched. They have amused, irritated, enchanted and befuddled viewers with their deadpan humor and irreverent antics. Regardless of how they are remembered in the annals of American art, their audience will never be the same.

Fictional States

Fictional States

From the perfectly organized island nation of Sir Thomas More's Utopiato the idealized mountain stronghold of Eldorado visited by the naive hero of Voltaire's Candide, the idea of the fictional state--utopian or dystopian, satirical or idealistic--has a long and distinguished pedigree in literature and philosophy. The issues explored by these classic imaginings--including questions of governmental organization, economic mechanisms, social policy and cultural norms--are just as vital today as in the past, and continue to give rise to new alternative states, nations, and principalities inspired equally by political dissent and artistic fancy. Journeying in this expanded landscape of imaginary municipalities--with its unorthodox histories, ersatz bureaucratic apparatuses, do-it-yourself credentials and fantasy topographies--Cabinetno. 18 features William Bryk on the ephemera of fictional states, George Pendle on the socio-political trajectory of micro-nations, and a conversation between David Levi Strauss and Michael Taussig on state-making and magic, as well as portfolios by invented nations including NSK, Elgaland-Vargaland, Sealand and the Hutt River Province Principality. The unthemed section includes Frances Stark on the charms of ivory; Christopher Turner on Spectro-Chrome Therapy; Samantha Hunt on Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace's "Difference Engine;" and projects by artists including Craig Kalpakjian, Sasha Chavchavadze and Caitlin Masley.

Sally Mann

The Flesh and the Spirit

Sally Mann

In collaboration with the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and accompanying its landmark 2010 exhibition, Aperture is pleased to publish Sally Mann: The Flesh and The Spirit, the first in-depth look at this world-renowned artists approach to the body. Throughout her career, Mann has fearlessly pushed her exploration of the human form, tackling o!en di"cult subject matter and making unapologetically sensual images that are simultaneously bold and lyrical. This beautifully produced publication includes Manns earliest platinum prints from the late 1970s, Polaroid still lifes, early color work of her children, haunting landscape images, recent self-portraits, and nude studies of her husband. The series document Manns interest in the body as principal subject, with the associated issues of vulnerability and mortality lending an elegiac note to her images. In bringing them together, author and curator John Ravenal examines the varied ways in which Manns experimental approach, including ambrotypes and gelatinsilver prints made from collodian wet-plate negatives, moves her subjects from the corporeal to the ethereal. Sally Mann: The Flesh and The Spirit, a one-of-a-kind publication, is a must for any serious library of photographic literature, students, scholars, collectors, and others interested in her work. Ravenal has written a comprehensive introduction as well as individual entries on each series, and essays by David Levi Strauss (Eros, Psyche, and the Mendacity of Photography) and Anne Wilkes Tucker (Living Memory) add di#erent, but equally illuminating perspectives to this work.

John Wood

On the Edge of Clear Meaning

John Wood

"John Wood: On the Edge of Clear Meaning, a comprehensive monograph on Wood's work, features an essay by David Levi Strauss, a biography and extensive bibliography compiled by William S. Johnson, and an assessment of Wood's important role as an educator for over thirty years by Ezra Shales."--BOOK JACKET.