Death Row: The Final Minutes

My life as an execution witness in America’s most infamous prison

Death Row: The Final Minutes

IN 12 YEARS, MICHELLE LYONS WITNESSED NEARLY 300 EXECUTIONS. First as a reporter and then as a spokesperson for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Michelle was a frequent visitor to Huntsville's Walls Unit, where she recorded and relayed the final moments of death row inmates' lives before they were put to death by the state. Michelle was in the death chamber as some of the United States' most notorious criminals, including serial killers, child murderers and rapists, spoke their last words on earth, while a cocktail of lethal drugs surged through their veins. Michelle supported the death penalty, before misgivings began to set in as the executions mounted. During her time in the prison system, and together with her dear friend and colleague, Larry Fitzgerald, she came to know and like some of the condemned men and women she saw die. She began to query the arbitrary nature of the death penalty and ask the question: do executions make victims of all of us? An incredibly powerful and unique look at the complex story of capital punishment, as told by those whose lives have been shaped by it, Death Row: The Final Minutes is an important take on crime and punishment at a fascinating point in America's political history.

Death Row

The Final Minutes

Death Row


The Rough Guide to Rock

The Rough Guide to Rock

Compiles career biographies of over 1,200 artists and rock music reviews written by fans covering every phase of rock from R&B through punk and rap.

Death Row Women

Murder, Justice, and the New York Press

Death Row Women

A vivid recounting of the crimes, trials, and media frenzy surrounding the six females sentenced to death in New York during the twentieth century.

The Death Penalty in American Cinema

Criminality and Retribution in Hollywood Film

The Death Penalty in American Cinema

Killing as punishment in the USA, whether ordained by lynch mob or by the courts, reflects a paradox of the American nation: liberal, pluralistic, yet prone to lethal violence. This book examines the encounter between the legal history of the death penalty in America and its cinematic representations, through a comprehensive narrative and historical view of films dealing with this genre, from the silent era to the present. It addresses central issues including racial prejudice and attitudes towards the execution of women, and discusses how cinema has chosen to deal with them. It explores how such films as Michael Curtiz's 20,000 Years in Sing Sing and Fritz Lang's The Fury, Errol Morris's documentary The Thin Blue Line, John Singleton's Rosewood and Frank Darabont's death-row movie The Green Mile, have helped to shape real historical developments and public perceptions by bringing into sharper relief the legal, social and cultural tensions associated with capital punishment. In the process, Yvonne Kozlovksy-Golan provides the reader with a superb understanding of the complexities of the death penalty through US history.

Library Journal

Library Journal

Includes, beginning Sept. 15, 1954 (and on the 15th of each month, Sept.-May) a special section: School library journal, ISSN 0000-0035, (called Junior libraries, 1954-May 1961). Also issued separately.

The Deprived

Innocent on Death Row

The Deprived

'The Deprived: Innocent on Death Row' describes how thousands of Americans are convicted of crimes they never committed. Many of them end up on death row where inmates have been executed despite their innocence.The book tells the dramatic stories of innocent death row inmates and investigates the murder cases that led to their wrongful convictions. It also proves what leads to false accusations and who's most likely to be incarcerated for a crime they never committed.'The Deprived: Innocent on Death Row' takes you on a journey through the US Justice system and proves its flaws and unjust through real human stories. It reminds of a suspense thriller. Just true. The book is based on interviews with 10 Americans who have all been affected by wrongful convictions and the death penalty. Get to know what it is like on death row when you are innocent and fighting for your life.

Innocence and the Death Penalty

Hearing Before the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, on S. 221, a Bill to Allow a Prisoner Under Sentence of Death to Obtain Judicial Review of Newly Discovered Evidence Showing that He is Probably Innocent, April 1, 1993

Innocence and the Death Penalty


The Inner Life of the Dying Person

The Inner Life of the Dying Person

This unique book recounts the experience of facing one's death solely from the dying person's point of view rather than from the perspective of caregivers, survivors, or rescuers. Such unmediated access challenges assumptions about the emotional and spiritual dimensions of dying, showing readers that—along with suffering, loss, anger, sadness, and fear—we can also feel courage, love, hope, reminiscence, transcendence, transformation, and even happiness as we die. A work that is at once psychological, sociological, and philosophical, this book brings together testimonies of those dying from terminal illness, old age, sudden injury or trauma, acts of war, and the consequences of natural disasters and terrorism. It also includes statements from individuals who are on death row, in death camps, or planning suicide. Each form of dying addressed highlights an important set of emotions and narratives that often eclipses stereotypical renderings of dying and reflects the numerous contexts in which this journey can occur outside of hospitals, nursing homes, and hospices. Chapters focus on common emotional themes linked to dying, expanding and challenging them through first-person accounts and analyses of relevant academic and clinical literature in psycho-oncology, palliative care, gerontology, military history, anthropology, sociology, cultural and religious studies, poetry, and fiction. The result is an all-encompassing investigation into an experience that will eventually include us all and is more surprising and profound than anyone can imagine.

China’s Death Penalty

History, Law and Contemporary Practices

China’s Death Penalty

By all accounts, China is the world leader in the number of legal executions. Its long historical use of capital punishment and its major political and economic changes over time are social facts that make China an ideal context for a case study of the death penalty in law and practice. This book examines the death penalty within the changing socio-political context of China. The authors'treatment of China' death penalty is legal, historical, and comparative. In particular, they examine; the substantive and procedures laws surrounding capital punishment in different historical periods the purposes and functions of capital punishment in China in various dynasties changes in the method of imposition and relative prevalence of capital punishment over time the socio-demographic profile of the executed and their crimes over the last two decades and comparative practices in other countries. Their analyses of the death penalty in contemporary China focus on both its theory - how it should be done in law - and actual practice - based on available secondary reports/sources.