Unreasonable Behaviour

An Autobiography

Unreasonable Behaviour

'He has known all forms of fear, he's an expert in it. He has come back from God knows how many brinks, all different. His experience in a Ugandan prison alone would be enough to unhinge another man - like myself, as a matter of fact - for good. He has been forfeit more times than he can remember, he says. But he is not bragging. Talking this way about death and risk, he seems to be implying quite consciously that by testing his luck each time, he is testing his Maker's indulgence' - John le Carre 'McCullin is required reading if you want to know what real journalism is all about' - The Times 'From the opening...there is hardly a dull sentence: his prose is so lively and uninhibited... An excellent book' - Sunday Telegraph 'Unsparing reminiscences that effectively combine the bittersweet life of a world-class photojournalist with a generous selection of his haunting lifework... A genuinely affecting memoir that reckons the cost and loss involved in making one's way on the cutting edge of conflict' - Kirkus Reviews 'If this was just a book of McCullin's war photographs it would be valuable enough. But it is much more' - Sunday Correspondent

Don McCullin

Don McCullin

"Don McCullin is one of the greatest photographers on conflict of our time. This book was concieved on a grand scale that does justice to his extraordinary life and the events he has witnessed. Now it is being published in a format that will make it available to a still wider readership. It forms one of the great documents of the latter part of the last century. The book begins and ends in the Somerset landscape that surrounds McCullin's home, but the whole sequence of more than two hundred photographs encompasses a ravaged northern England, war in Cyprus, Biafra, Vietnam, Cambodia, Beirut and riots in Derry. The climax of the book is among the cannibals and tribespeople deep in the jungles of Irian Jaya, where McCullin focuses on humanity in an almost Stone Age condition. The introduction by Harold Evans, the acclaimed newspaper editor and authority on photojournalism, is drawn from his long experience of working with McCullin. The distinguished novelist and essayist, Susan Sontag, has contributed an essay on McCullin and the role of witness to conflict - a subject of timely pertinence."

Shaped By War

Shaped By War

No other photographer in modern times has recorded war and its aftermath as widely and unsparingly as Don McCullin. After a childhood in London during the Blitz, and after the hardships of evacuation, McCullin feels his life has indeed been shaped by war. From the building of the Berlin Wall at the height of the Cold War to El Salvador and Kurdistan, McCullin has covered the major conflicts of the last fifty years, with the notable exception of the Falklands, for which he was denied access. His pictures from the Citadel in Hue and in the ruins of Beirut are among the most unflinching records of modern war. The publication of many of his greatest stories in the Sunday Times magazine did much to raise the consciousness of a generation, even if he himself now fears that photographs cannot prevent history from repeating itself. The brutality of conflict returns over and over again. McCullin here voices his despair. McCullin recounts the course of his professional life in a series of devastating texts on war, the events and the power of photography. The conclusion of the book marks McCullin’s retreat to the Somerset landscape surrounding his home, where the dark skies over England remind him yet again of images of war. Despite the sense of belonging and even contentment, for him there is no final escape.

In England

In England

Don McCullin’s view of England is rooted in two worlds—his wartime childhood, and his youth in 1950s Finsbury Park. His first published photograph was a picture of a gang from his neighborhood, which appeared in a newspaper after a local murder. McCullin always balanced his anger at the unacceptable face of the nation with tenderness or compassion, and in this collection, he envisions his home country with its perpetual social gulf between the affluent and the desperate in mind. He continues in the same black and white tradition as he did between foreign assignments for the Sunday Times in the 1960s and 1970s, when his view of a deprived Britain seemed as dark as the conflict zones from which he had just escaped. This book marks his return to the cities and landscape he knew as a young photographer, adding wry humor to his famed lyricism. At a time when we might believe the world has changed beyond our imagination, McCullin shows us a view of England where the line between the wealthy and the impoverished is as defined as ever, the nation as a whole as absurd as it is tragic.

Sleeping with Ghosts

A Life's Work in Photography

Sleeping with Ghosts

This book presents the life's work of one of the great photojournalists of our time, who raised the status of his craft to that of high art. From India to Biafra, from Northern Ireland to Vietnam, McCullin's images reveal a compassionate contact between human beings in harsh environments.

Don McCullin

Don McCullin


Donald McCullin

Donald McCullin


Cold Heaven

Don McCullin on AIDS in Africa

Cold Heaven


The Landscape

The Landscape

After a career spanning sixty years, Sir Don McCullin, once a witness to conflict across the globe, has become one of the greatest landscape photographers of our time.0His pastoral view is far from idyllic. Though the woods and stream close to his house in Somerset have offered some respite, he has not sought out the quiet corners of rural England.0He is drawn, instead, to the drama of approaching storms. He has an acute sense of how the emptiness of his immediate landscape echoes a wider tone of disquiet.0This is a beautifully produced photographic book containing sublime views of England shrouded in mist, snow, water or cowering beneath an overwhelming sky.0And although the majority of the images featured are from Great Britain, it also includes stunning scenes from Syria, Iraq, France, Morocco, Sudan, India and Indonesia.

Skulduggery

Skulduggery

When Don McCullin and Mark Shand decided to get away from it all, they ended up on the other side of the world - in the Asmat region of Irian Jaya in Indonesia, home of the ferocious nomadic tribe, the Orang Hutan. Mark Shand gives an account of their fitful progress - a story of drama and farce, of compassion and earthly high spirits, of terrific muddles and incredible bravery. After seeing off the dangers of crocodiles, spiders and jungle latrines, they track down the Orang Hutan, possibly the first white men to do so.