Uptown/Downtown in Old Charleston

Sketches and Stories

Uptown/Downtown in Old Charleston

Growing up in Charleston in the 1930s and 1940s, accomplished storyteller Louis Rubin witnessed firsthand the subtle gradations of caste and class among neighborhoods, from south of Broad Street where established families, ancestral glories, and traditional mores held sway, to the various enclaves of Uptown in which middle-class and blue-collar families went about their own diverse lives and routines. Changing circumstances within his own family impelled his absorption in what seemed to be two separate worlds, and granted him a remarkable perspective into Charleston's evolving identity as an historic seaport on the cusp of modernity during the Great Depression and the onset of World War II. Rubin's wide-eyed narrator takes readers on excursions to Adger's Wharf, the Battery, Union Terminal, the shops of King Street, the Majestic Theater, the College of Charleston, and other recognizable landmarks. With youthful glee he watches the barges and shrimp trawlers along the waterfront, rides streetcars down Rutledge Avenue and trains to Savannah and Richmond, paddles the Ashley River in a leaky homemade boat, pitches left-handed for the youngest team in the Twilight Baseball League, ponders the curious chanting coming from the Jewish Community Center, and catches magical glimpses of the Morris Island lighthouse from atop the Folly Beach Ferris wheel. His fascination with the gas-electric Boll Weevil train epitomizes his appreciation for the freedom of movement between the worlds of Uptown and Downtown. The collection ends with a homecoming to Charleston by our narrator, then a young man in his early twenties, as his inbound train is greeted by familiar vistas as well as by views he had never encountered before. This is the city Rubin called home, where there were always surprising discoveries to be found, both in the burgeoning newness of Uptown and the storied legacies of old Downtown.

Retail in Detail

Retail in Detail

Since it was first published, Retail in Detail has helped tens of thousands of retail business owners successfully start and run their businesses. It has established a reputation as a no-nonsense, down-to-earth guide for small retailers. This fifth edition has been fully updated for today’s rapidly changing retail environment in the Internet age. A new chapter contains specific tips on using the Internet for marketing and two-way communication with customers. New sections cover becoming an e-tailer, including choosing a domain name, processing credit cards, shipping and receiving, and other Internet-specific issues. Brick-and-mortar retailers learn how to assess product vulnerability to competition from Internet businesses. This essential reference contains many specific examples and case studies, based on the author’s experiences starting and successfully operating three retail stores and a bed and breakfast, as well as on the experiences of dozens of successful entrepreneurs. Worksheets can be used by beginning retailers to plan for and operate their business.

American Urban Architecture

Catalysts in the Design of Cities

American Urban Architecture

Attoe and Logan propose a specifically American theory of urban design. Arguing that theories of urban design, especially theories about the remaking of cities, have been largely European in origin and thus of questionable value in American contexts, the authors see the characteristic features of American cities--the grid, loft buildings, distinctive styling, and so forth--as opportunities for a specifically American urbanism.

Unruly Cities?

Order/Disorder

Unruly Cities?

The text argues that cities are open to many forms of order and disorder both from within the city and outside. They represent cities potentials as well as their problems. It challenges the assumption that cities are threatened by disorder from below and that they might be ruled by 'order' imposed from above.

Signs in Use

An Introduction to Semiotics

Signs in Use

Signs in Use is an accessible introduction to the study of semiotics. All organisms, from bees to computer networks, create signs, communicate, and exchange information. The field of semiotics explores the ways in which we use these signs to make inferences about the nature of the world. Signs in Use cuts across different semiotic schools to introduce six basic concepts which present semiotics as a theory and a set of analytical tools: code, sign, discourse, action, text, and culture. Moving from the most simple to the most complex concept, the book gradually widens the semiotic perspective to show how and why semiotics works as it does. Each chapter covers a problem encountered in semiotics and explores the key concepts and relevant notions found in the various theories of semiotics. Chapters build gradually on knowledge gained, and can also be used as self-contained units for study when supported by the extensive glossary. The book is illustrated with numerous examples, from traffic systems to urban parks, and offers useful biographies of key twentieth-century semioticians.

Downtown Development Or Region

Downtown Development Or Region


Downtown Newport News

Downtown Newport News

Settled in 1621, Newport News has the oldest English place name of any city in the New World. Its name is said to have come from “Newport’s news” that supply ships were coming to save the starving Jamestown colonists in 1610. Farming and fishing were the primary occupations until Collis P. Huntington chose Newport News for the eastern terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway in the 1870s. In 1886, he founded the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, which has built some of the most famous ships in history. By 1900, a vital city had grown where there were previously only farms and forest. Through vivid images, maps, and reminiscences, Images of America: Downtown Newport News tells the story of the city’s once popular and thriving downtown commercial, social, and entertainment area, which met its end from flight to the suburbs after World War II.