Retreat & Rearguard: Dunkirk 1940

The Evacuation of the BEF to the Channel Ports

Retreat & Rearguard: Dunkirk 1940

The dramatic story of how a quarter million men were evacuated from the coast of France—and how the British Expeditionary Force fought on. This book, part of the Retreat and Rearguard series, covers the actions of the BEF during the retreat from the Dyle Line to the evacuation points of Dunkirk, Boulogne, Calais, Saint-Valery-en-Caux, and finally the Cherbourg Peninsula. Some of the engagements are relatively well known (Cassell, the Arras counter-attack, and the notorious Le Paradis SS massacre), but the author has unearthed many less known engagements from the long and painful withdrawal. While the main Dunkirk evacuation from the port and beaches was over by early June, elements of the BEF fought on until June 21. In relating those often heroic actions, this book catches the atmosphere of desperate defiance that typified this never-to-be-forgotten period.

Dunkirk 1940: 'Whereabouts Unknown'

How Untrained Troops of the Labour Division were Sacrificed to Save an Army

Dunkirk 1940: 'Whereabouts Unknown'

They called it ‘the slaughter of the innocents’. The barely trained and poorly equipped men of the Labour Divisions were never meant to fight, but when the German blitzkreig sliced through the Allied armies they were all that stood in the way of the annihilation of the British Expeditionary Force. Paying with their lives they bought precious time as the army fell back towards Dunkirk, and long after the last of the little ships reached home, the men of the Labour Divisions fought on. Dunkirk 1940: Whereabouts Unknown uses official reports, diaries and personal accounts to tell the story of the chaos, terror and heroism of the amateur soldiers of 137th Infantry Brigade during the fall of France. ‘Well-sourced, well-illustrated and well-written’ – Britain at War magazine ‘A remarkable book’ – Soldier magazine

Dunkirk, 1940

A History

Dunkirk, 1940


World War II Map by Map

World War II Map by Map

The deadliest war in history brought to life through bold, easy-to-grasp maps In this stunning visual history ebook, purpose-made maps reveal the full story of the Second World War. From the rise of the Axis powers to the aftermath of the atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima, this ebook shows how each step of the action took place. Each map is full of detail, charting the progress of the key events of World War II on land, sea, and air, including the Dunkirk evacuation, the attack on Pearl Harbor, the D-Day landings, the siege of Stalingrad, and the war in the Pacific. As well as purpose-made maps, historical maps from both Allied and Axis countries give compelling insights into the course of the war. There are also timelines summarizing each stage of the conflict as it unfolded, while fascinating, large-scale photographs offer a closer look at life both on and off the battlefield, introducing topics such as blitzkrieg tactics, civilian life in wartime, code-breaking, and more. Written by a team of historians headed by Richard Overy as consultant, World War II Map by Map shows how the deadliest conflict in history changed the face of our world. It is perfect for general readers, students, and military history enthusiasts everywhere. Includes a foreword by Peter Snow, broadcaster and historian.

Tigers at Dunkirk

The Leicestershire Regiment and the Fall of France

Tigers at Dunkirk

"In this compelling new study of the disastrous 1940 campaign in France and Flanders, Matthew Richardson reconstructs in vivid detail the British Army's defeat as it was experienced by the soldiers of a single battalion, the 2nd/5th Leicesters. These men typified the ill-equipped, under-trained British battalions that faced the Blitzkrieg and the might of Hitler's legions. They were thrown into a series of desperate, one-sided engagements that resulted in a humiliating retreat, then evacuation from Dunkirk. This is their story"--Publisher's description.

Encyclopedia of the Second World War

Encyclopedia of the Second World War

The ultimate reference book on the war that changed the world. Over 3000 fact-packed entries in an easy-to-use A-Z format. A full who's who of World War II: features over 500 personalities, from warlords to combat heroes.

Dunkirk

Dunkirk


Gas Masks for Goal Posts

Football in Britain During the Second World War

Gas Masks for Goal Posts

I was 12th man for England against Wales at Wembley. Within a few minutes, the Welsh half-back broke his collar bone. They had no reserves and I was the only spare player to hand. That's how I made my international debut - for Wales. - Stan Mortensen, Blackpool and England. When Britain declared war on Germany in September 1939, football came to an abrupt halt. Large crowds were banned, stadiums were given over to military use, most players joined up. Then it was realised that if victory remained the national goal, soccer could help - and football went to war. For the next six years the game became hugely important to Britain. Boosting morale among servicemen, munitions workers and beleaguered citizens alike - and raising hundreds of thousands of pounds for war funds. It was a game with plenty of human stories. Some footballers were dubbed 'PT commandos' or 'D-Day dodgers'. Others, however, saw action. Pre-war heroes on the pitch became wartime heroes off it. This book captures the atmosphere of the time and tells the story of a unique period in football's history.

In the Footsteps of the Red Baron

In the Footsteps of the Red Baron

Manfred von Richthofen became a fighter pilot on the Western Front in August 1916. By January 1917, Richthofen had shot down fifteen aircraft had been appointed commander of his own unit. He painted the fuselage of his Albatros D-III a bright red and was nicknamed the Red Baron. In June 1917, Richthofen was appointed commander of the German Flying Circus. Made up of Germany's top fighter pilots, this new unit was highly mobile and could be quickly sent to any part of the Western Front where it was most needed. Richthofen and his pilots achieved immediate success during the air war over Ypres during August and September. Manfred von Richthofen was killed on 21st April 1918. Richthofen had destroyed 80 allied aircraft, the highest score of any fighter pilot during the First World War. This book is divided into three sectors of the WWI front line in which von Richthofen operated. Each area is conveniently reached within hours. Airfield sites, memorials and the graves of Manfred's famous victims are described and directions for the battlefield walker are included with information on related museums and historic sites with special association with this most famous of fighter pilots.