Early Mesopotamia

Society and Economy at the Dawn of History

Early Mesopotamia

The roots of our modern world lie in the civilization of Mesopotamia, which saw the development of the first urban society and the invention of writing. The cuneiform texts reveal the technological and social innovations of Sumer and Babylonia as surprisingly modern, and the influence of this fascinating culture was felt throughout the Near East. Early Mesopotamia gives an entirely new account, integrating the archaeology with historical data which until now have been largely scattered in specialist literature.

Early Mesopotamia

Society and Economy at the Dawn of History

Early Mesopotamia

The roots of our modern world lie in the civilization of Mesopotamia, which saw the development of the first urban society and the invention of writing. The cuneiform texts reveal the technological and social innovations of Sumer and Babylonia as surprisingly modern, and the influence of this fascinating culture was felt throughout the Near East. Early Mesopotamia gives an entirely new account, integrating the archaeology with historical data which until now have been largely scattered in specialist literature.

Ancient Mesopotamia

Ancient Mesopotamia

Innovative study of the early state and urban societies in Mesopotamia, c. 5000 to 2100 BC.

The Evolution of Urban Society

Early Mesopotamia and Prehispanic Mexico

The Evolution of Urban Society

The Evolution of Urban Society is concerned with the presentation and analysis of regularities in the two best-documented examples of early, independent urban society: Mesopotamia and central Mexico. It provides a systematic comparison of institutional forms and trends of growth that are to be found in both of them. Adams shows why the study of societal evolution is so significant, and why it has remained a durable and attractive anthropological focus of interest. The Evolution of Urban Society remains required reading for students of anthropology, ethnography, ancient civilizations, and world history. As Elizabeth Carter noted in Science, this volume set the agenda for contemporary research into early urbanism in the [Mesopotamian] region.

Materiality of Writing in Early Mesopotamia

Materiality of Writing in Early Mesopotamia

This volume presents recent research on the relationship between the material format of text-bearing artefacts, the texts they carry, and their genre. The essays cover a vast period, from the counting stones of the late 4th millennium BCE to the time of the Great Hittite Kingdom in the 2nd millennium BCE. The breadth of substantive focus allows new insights of relevance to scholars in both Ancient Middle Eastern studies and the humanities.

Establishing Value

Weight Measures in Early Mesopotamia

Establishing Value

This book explores the reasons for which weights and scales were used to measure goods in Early Mesopotamia (ca. 3,200-2,000 BCE). The vast corpus of cuneiform records from this period sheds light on the various mechanisms behind the development of this cultural innovation. Weighing became the means of articulating the value of both imported and locally-produced goods within a socioeconomic system that had reached an unprecedented level of complexity. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of this cultural and economic phenomenon, which simultaneously reflected and shaped the relationships between individuals and groups in Mesopotamia throughout the third millennium BCE.

Ancient Mesopotamia

New Perspectives

Ancient Mesopotamia

The first general introduction to Mesopotamia that covers all four of the area's major ancient civilizations—Sumer, Akkad, Assyria, and Babylonia. * Original materials and documents, including quotations from the world's first written literature * Detailed chronology of the kings of major Mesopotamian states, including neighboring Elam, with summaries of the major periods of prehistoric and historical development

Daily Life in Ancient Mesopotamia

Daily Life in Ancient Mesopotamia

The ancient world of Mesopotamia (from Sumer to the subsequent division into Babylonia and Assyria) vividly comes alive in this portrayal of the time period from 3100 bce to the fall of Assyria (612 bce) and Babylon (539 bce). Students, teachers, and interested readers will discover fascinating details about the lives of these people taken from the ancients' own quotations and descriptions. These detailed anecdotes from the people themselves easily convey factual material. A wealth of information is provided on such varied topics as: education; literature; mathematics and science; city vs. country life; family life; and religion, as well as many other subjects.

The Evolution of Urban Society

Early Mesopotamia and Prehispanic Mexico

The Evolution of Urban Society

The Evolution of Urban Society is concerned with the presentation and analysis of regularities in the two best-documented examples of early, independent urban society: Mesopotamia and central Mexico. It provides a systematic comparison of institutional forms and trends of growth that are to be found in both of them. Emphasizing basic similarities in structure rather than the many acknowledged formal features by which each culture is rendered distinguishable from all others, it demonstrates that both societies can usefully be regarded as variants of a single processual pattern.