European Conquest and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The Moral Backwardness of International Society

European Conquest and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

An examination of the rights and representation of indigenous peoples in the expansion of international society.

Sovereignty and the Law: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Sovereignty and the Law: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Atlantic History, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of Atlantic History, the study of the transnational interconnections between Europe, North America, South America, and Africa, particularly in the early modern and colonial period. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.oxfordbibliographies.com.

Reflections on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Reflections on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The adoption of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by the United Nations General Assembly on 13 September 2007 was acclaimed as a major success for the United Nations system given the extent to which it consolidates and develops the international corpus of indigenous rights. This is the first in-depth academic analysis of this far-reaching instrument. Indigenous representatives have argued that the rights contained in the Declaration, and the processes by which it was formulated, obligate affected States to accept the validity of its provisions and its interpretation of contested concepts (such as 'culture', 'land', 'ownership' and 'self-determination'). This edited collection contains essays written by the main protagonists in the development of the Declaration; indigenous representatives; and field-leading academics. It offers a comprehensive institutional, thematic and regional analysis of the Declaration. In particular, it explores the Declaration's normative resonance for international law and considers the ways in which this international instrument could catalyse institutional action and influence the development of national laws and policies on indigenous issues.

Ethics and Culture: Indigenous People and the Concept of Selfdetermination

Ethics and Culture: Indigenous People and the Concept of Selfdetermination

Essay from the year 2006 in the subject Politics - International Politics - General and Theories, grade: 1.5, The Australian National University, 27 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: It seems a peculiarity of modern capitalist civilisation, that wherever one looks one sees squares everywhere! Just as this piece of paper, the screen and keys it was typed on are square, so are the borders of countless states around the globe, cutting through autochthonous communities separating cultures or forging them into a state [society] often lacking their prior consent. It is not without fateful irony that, for instance, the table on which the fate of the African people was decided during the Berlin conference in 1884-85 at which the [still prevailing] borders of colonial Africa were demarcated was: Square! Square people with square minds made square decisions. However, contemporary claims of many indigenous peoples who are as diverse and irregular as the world they exist in continue to challenge the plane polygon geometry of the arbitrary and artificially constructed artefact of territorial sovereignty by demanding recognition of their, partial or full self-determination. Thus questioning the moral legitimacy of sovereign states and the international society [of states].

The Oxford Handbook of Political Science

The Oxford Handbook of Political Science

Drawing on the rich resources of the ten-volume series of The Oxford Handbooks of Political Science, this one-volume distillation provides a comprehensive overview of all the main branches of contemporary political science: political theory; political institutions; political behavior; comparative politics; international relations; political economy; law and politics; public policy; contextual political analysis; and political methodology. Sixty-seven of the top political scientists worldwide survey recent developments in those fields and provide penetrating introductions to exciting new fields of study. Following in the footsteps of the New Handbook of Political Science edited by Robert Goodin and Hans-Dieter Klingemann a decade before, this Oxford Handbook will become an indispensable guide to the scope and methods of political science as a whole. It will serve as the reference book of record for political scientists and for those following their work for years to come.

Re-envisioning Sovereignty

The End of Westphalia?

Re-envisioning Sovereignty

Sovereignty, as a concept, is in a state of flux. In the course of the last century, traditional meanings have been worn away while the limitations of sovereignty have been altered as transnational issues compete with domestic concerns for precedence. This volume presents an interdisciplinary analysis of conceptions of sovereignty. Divided into six overarching elements, it explores a wide range of issues that have altered the theory and practice of state sovereignty, such as: human rights and the use of force for human protection purposes, norms relating to governance, the war on terror, economic globalization, the natural environment and changes in strategic thinking. The authors are acknowledged experts in their respective areas, and discuss the contemporary meaning and relevance of sovereignty and how it relates to the constitution of international order.

Africa's Health Challenges

Sovereignty, Mobility of People and Healthcare Governance

Africa's Health Challenges

This volume addresses the ideational and policy-oriented challenges of Africa’s health governance due to voluntary and involuntary cross-border migration of people and diseases in a growing 'mobile Africa'. The collected set of specialized contributions in this volume examines how national and regional policy innovation can address the competing conception of sovereignty in dealing with Africa’s emerging healthcare problems in a fast-paced, interconnect world.

Hospitality and World Politics

Hospitality and World Politics

A long neglected concept in the field of international relations and political theory, hospitality provides a new framework for analysing many of the challenges in world politics today, from the search for peaceable relations between states to asylum and refugee crises.

Nation to Nation

Aboriginal Sovereignty and the Future of Canada

Nation to Nation


Conquest by Law

How the Discovery of America Dispossessed Indigenous Peoples of Their Lands

Conquest by Law

In 1823, Chief Justice John Marshall handed down a Supreme Court decision of monumental importance in defining the rights of indigenous peoples throughout the English-speaking world. At the heart of the decision for Johnson v. M'Intosh was a "discovery doctrine" that gave rights of ownership to the European sovereigns who "discovered" the land and converted the indigenous owners into tenants. Though its meaning and intention has been fiercely disputed, more than 175 years later, this doctrine remains the law of the land. In 1991, while investigating the discovery doctrine's historical origins Lindsay Robertson made a startling find; in the basement of a Pennsylvania furniture-maker, he discovered a trunk with the complete corporate records of the Illinois and Wabash Land Companies, the plaintiffs in Johnson v. M'Intosh. Conquest by Law provides, for the first time, the complete and troubling account of the European "discovery" of the Americas. This is a gripping tale of political collusion, detailing how a spurious claim gave rise to a doctrine--intended to be of limited application--which itself gave rise to a massive displacement of persons and the creation of a law that governs indigenous people and their lands to this day.