Father Hunger

Why God Calls Men to Love and Lead Their Families

Father Hunger

Filled with practical ideas and self-evaluation tools, Father Hungerboth encourages and challenges men to embrace the high calling of fatherhood, becoming the dads that their families and our culture so desperately need them to be."

Father Hunger

Fathers, Daughters, and the Persuit of Thinness (Large Print 16pt)

Father Hunger

The first edition of this book added the term ''father hunger'' to everyday language, to explain the emptiness, and resulting food and body-image disorders, experienced by women with physically or emotionally absent fathers. Based on ten years of further study, this Second Edition of Father Hunger details the origins of the syndrome and its effect on the family, with new practical solutions to help dada and daughters understand and improve their relationships. Dr. Maine also introduces the concept of ''Global Girls'' which describes today's adolescents in terms of the globalization of media, corporate marketing, and body image. An expanded section for educators and therapists offers strategies and techniques for preventing impasses in treatment. REVIEWS. . .''The book offers healthy, well-balanced advice to family members and health practitioners. It is a unique book not only for its clinical insights for therapists but also for school counselors and educators as well. '' - Karen H. Jones, Ph.D., The Prevention Researcher ''Fact one; Dads tend to withdraw from girls during adolescence. Fact two; Adolescent girls too often develop unhealthy eating behaviors. Put these two ideas together and you get a fascinating book called Father Hunger.'' - Daughters; A newsletter for parents of girls ages 8-18 ''Dr. Maine does a nice job of integrating psychological and sociological research into her material. An important contribution of work in this area, suitable for community college students and up.'' - Choice ''Practical advice to help readers understand and improve father-daughter relationships, and helps families at multi-generational levels to reconnect. - Betitina Wood, Healthline ''I found the book to be 'carefronting' in relationship to my own married daughter and granddaughter. . . an excellent systemic book for therapists as well. . . it has good theory, is reality based, and has practical suggestions. I enjoyed reading this book.'' - Ralph Earle, Ph.D., past-President, American Association of Marriage & Family Therapy ''this powerful book clearly explains how a father's emotional or physical absence can contribute to a daughter's eating problems, body dissatisfaction, and low self-esteem.''

Father Hunger

Explorations with Adults and Children

Father Hunger

James M. Herzog's Father Hunger: Explorations with Adults and Children will quickly take its place both as a landmark contribution to developmental psychology and as an enduring classic in the clinical literature of psychoanalysis. We live in an era when a great many children grow up without a father, or, worse still, with fathers who traumatically abuse them. Yet, society continues to ignore the emotional price that children pay, and often continue to pay throughout their lives, for this tragic state of affairs. Father Hunger will change this situation. First drawn to his topic by observing the recurring nightmares of clinic-referred children of newly separated parents - nightmares in which the children's fear of their own aggression was coupled with desperate wishes for their fathers' return - Herzog went on to spend more than two decades exploring the role of the father in a variety of naturalistic settings. He discovered that the characteristically intense manner in which fathers engaged their children provided an experience of contained excitement that served as a necessary scaffolding to the children's emerging sense of self and as a potential buffer against future trauma. A brilliant observer and remarkably gifted, caring clinician, Herzog remains true to the ambiguities and multiple leves of meaning that arise in therapeutic encounters with real people. He consistently locates his therapeutic strategies and clinical discoveries within a sophisticated observational framework, thus making his formulations about father hunger and its remediation of immediate value to scientific researchers. A model of humane psychoanalytic exploration in response to a deepening social problem, Father Hunger is a clinical document destined to raise public consciousness and help shape social policy. And in the extraordinary stories of therapeutic struggle and restoration that emerge from its pages, it is a stunning testament to the resiliency of the human spirit.

Father Hunger

Father Hunger

Here is a book for men and women who hunger for something deeper and more authentic in their relationships with their fathers. Your relationship with your father affects your emotional style, your relationships, and the way you think about God.

We Ain't Got No Daddy

Epidemic Father Hunger in the African-American Community

We Ain't Got No Daddy

According to most national studies including the U.S. Census Bureau, over two-thirds of all African-American families currently have no fathers positively involved with them on a daily basis. Paternal abandonment has become too commonplace and passively accepted as normal in the African-American community. However, fathers abandoning their children-either physically or emotionally-is not at all normal in humanity, and we are certainly beginning to see the effects of this atrocity. Margo Maine defined father hunger as the "deep, persistent desire for emotional connection with the father that is experienced by all children." Father hunger is the result of receiving too little quality fathering as a child or adolescent due to physical or emotional paternal abandonment. Consequently, the abandoned offspring subconsciously craves paternal attention, affection, affirmation, advice, and accountability. Almost all victims of father hunger have no conscious idea of what they are being victimized by and how they are affected.Regardless of how old we are at the moment, if paternal attention, affection, affirmation, advice, and accountability were not accessible in our childhood then our whole life typically becomes a tragic search for these things. The real tragedy is that we do not even know that these things are what we are looking for; our craving for quality fathering is usually a subconscious phenomenon. We are simply driven by our core need to be noticed, loved, and celebrated for who we are. The absence of paternal attention, affection, affirmation, advice, and accountability creates individuals who have low self-esteem and who rarely fulfill their potential because they are unable to take risks for fear of the impact failure may have on their fragile self-image or who take excessive risks with no real concern for themselves. Such individuals also attach themselves to almost anything that appears to offer them the attention, affection, affirmation, advice, and accountability lost to paternal abandonment. Behind all of the symptoms of father hunger is the underlying theme of self-devaluation and subsequent acting out and aim inhibition in order to compensate the abandoned offspring's ego. However, because our egos typically suppress all knowledge of this self-devaluation it is extremely difficult for the father hungry to identify the source of their self-destructive life decisions. As a result, most father hungry miscreants simply blame their misguided behavior on some character flaw they apparently possess, which only creates a modern and memorable incident of self-devaluation.

All Things Censored

All Things Censored

A collection of essays, letters, and other writing from jailed journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal features fifty pieces in all, including the radio essays that were recorded for but never aired on National Public Radio's All Things Considered. Reprint.

The Good Father

On Men, Masculinity, and Life in the Family

The Good Father

Fathering is one of the most basic and profound human activities. Yet in addition to its many joys, fatherhood is often freighted with longing, sadness, anger, and misunderstanding. Most of us, men and women alike, are acutely aware of how difficult it is to father well, year after year, until, and even after, children are grown. At the same time, the essential relationships between men and women and their children are under stress these days as never before, subject to the pressures of work, money, divorce, remarriage, and adoption. As a result, many fathers struggle with deep uncertainties about their parenting abilities. Meanwhile, society's definitions of masculinity appear ever more fluid, negotiable, and unreachable in today's media-saturated culture, which endlessly exposes men (and women) to a stream of images celebrating violence, war, hypermasculinity, athletic ability, corporate competition, alternative life-styles, "metrosexuality," and triumphant materialism. Who, men might rightfully ask, are we expected to be? Do various pop-cultural definitions of masculinity really reflect what it is to be a man? What in men's true natures helps them be good fathers? Can aggression be useful? What masculine traits do fathers need to guard -- and guard against? How do men love their children, and how is being a father very different from and no less essential than being a mother? And how can women understand how men experience fatherhood? This is the rich social reality that Dr. Mark O'Connell, a psychotherapist and father of three, addresses in his provocative, brilliant, and wise book. Drawing on both his professional case histories and personal experience, O'Connell describes the internal conflicts that many men feel about the difficulties of being a father but which they are often unable to discuss easily. Such issues include questions about authority, discipline, intimacy, physical contact, and sexuality. In ways that are distinctly masculine, O'Connell says, fathers communicate standards, insist on respect for others, instigate necessary confrontations, and even engage in the kind of rough-and-tumble play that enlivens the developing neural structures in a child's brain. O'Connell contends that fathers play a crucial role in conveying the rules, expectations, and inevitabilities of life, and he describes how men can help their families by understanding and embracing their own masculinity. Men are different from women and must be allowed to parent differently as well. The Good Father, however, is not just a very readable book for fathers struggling to find their best selves in relation to their spouses and children. Women will want to read The Good Father as well. All men and women have complex and important relationships with their fathers, whether or not those men were good fathers. Dr. O'Connell reveals how men and women alike bring these relationships to their parenting, and how we so often need to untangle these generational knots. Filled with reassuring common sense, The Good Father opens a path toward happier, more satisfying relationships for the entire family while helping men become the good fathers they deeply want to be.

Real and Imaginary Fathers

Development, Transference, and Healing

Real and Imaginary Fathers

In this work, Salman Akhtar looks at how many fathers unconsciously, and sometimes quite consciously, attempt to revise their own traumatized childhood by providing their children with possibilities for "a good life", of which they were deprived.

An Anchor for the Soul

Help for the Present, Hope for the Future

An Anchor for the Soul

People have honest doubts and questions about God that deserve solid answers. How do we explain the Gospel of Jesus Christ in a way we can all understand? Ray Pritchard has updated this best-selling presentation of the gospel in a clear, straightforward way using simple language and clear Scripture references. An Anchor for the Soul is written with doubters, seekers, and skeptics in mind. In a clear, straightforward presentation, he answers questions such as: What is God like? How can I know Him? Who is Jesus and what did He do? What does it mean to be a Christian? Through stories and illustrations, Pastor Pritchard very personally, yet gently, challenges his readers with the Good News of Jesus Christ.