Glimpses of Abhidharma

From a Seminar on Buddhist Psychology

Glimpses of Abhidharma

The Abhidharma is a collection of Buddhist scriptures that investigate the workings of the mind and the states of human consciousness. In this book, Chögyam Trungpa shows how an examination of the formation of the ego provides us with an opportunity to develop real intelligence. Trungpa also presents the practice of meditation as the means that enables us to see our psychological situation clearly and directly.

The Collected Works of Chogyam Trungpa: Volume Two

The Path Is the Goal; Training the Mind; Glimpses of Abhidharma; Glimpses of Shu nyata; Glimpses of Mahayana; Selected Writings

The Collected Works of Chogyam Trungpa: Volume Two

The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa brings together in eight volumes the writings of the first and most influential and inspirational Tibetan teachers to present Buddhism in the West. Organized by theme, the collection includes full-length books as well as articles, seminar transcripts, poems, plays, and interviews, many of which have never before been available in book form. From memoirs of his escape from Chinese-occupied Tibet to insightful discussions of psychology, mind, and meditation; from original verse and calligraphy to the esoteric lore of tantric Buddhism—the impressive range of Trungpa's vision, talents, and teachings is showcased in this landmark series. Volume Two examines meditation, mind, and Mahayana, the "great vehicle" for the development of compassion and the means to help others. Chögyam Trungpa introduced a new psychological language and way for looking at the Buddhist teachings in the West. His teachings on human psychology and the human mind are included in this volume.

Ocean of Dharma

The Everyday Wisdom of Chogyam Trungpa

Ocean of Dharma

Here is an inspiring collection of short teachings from the writings of the renowned Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa. Pithy and immediate, these teachings can be contemplated and practiced every day—or any day—of the year. Drawn from a wide variety of sources—including never-before-published writings—Ocean of Dharma addresses a range of topics, including fear and fearlessness, accepting our imperfections, developing confidence, helping others, appreciating our basic goodness, and everyday life as a spiritual path.

The Collected Works of Chogyam Trungpa: Volume Six

Glimpses of Space; Orderly Chaos; Secret Beyond Thought; The Tibetan Book of the Dead: Commentary; Transcending Madness; Selected Writings

The Collected Works of Chogyam Trungpa: Volume Six

The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa brings together in eight volumes the writings of one of the first and most influential and inspirational Tibetan teachers to present Buddhism in the West. Organized by theme, the collection includes full-length books as well as articles, seminar transcripts, poems, plays, and interviews, many of which have never before been available in book form. From memoirs of his escape from Chinese-occupied Tibet to insightful discussions of psychology, mind, and meditation; from original verse and calligraphy to the esoteric lore of tantric Buddhism—the impressive range of Trungpa's vision, talents, and teachings is showcased in this landmark series. Volume Six contains advanced teachings on the nature of mind and tantric experiences. Chögyam Trungpa's commentary on the Tibetan Book of the Dead explains what this classic text teaches about human psychology. Transcending Madness presents a unique view of the Tibetan concept of bardo. Orderly Chaos explains the inner meaning of the mandala. Secret Beyond Thought presents teachings on the five chakras and the four karmas. Glimpses of Space consists of two seminars: "The Feminine Principle" and "Evam." In the article "Femininity," the author presents a playful look at the role of feminine energy in Buddhist teachings. "The Bardo," based on teachings given in England in the 1960s, has not been available in published form for many years.

Warrior-King of Shambhala

Remembering Chogyam Trungpa

Warrior-King of Shambhala

A pioneer in introducing Tibetan Buddhism to the West, Chogyam Trungpa is also one of its most controversial figures. Born in Tibet and trained in the traditional manner, he arrived in the U.S. in 1970, a time when there was virtually no knowledge of Buddhism in the general culture. He defied notions of how a holy man should act. Dressing in Western clothing and at times exhibiting unconventional behavior, his "crazy wisdom" made him a magnet for a generation of spiritual seekers. One of those seekers was Jeremy Hayward. This intimate memoir begins with their first meeting in 1970, then progresses year by year until Trungpa's death and beyond. Hayward vividly describes Trungpa's powerful, direct way of working with students, his groundbreaking work in bringing Buddhism to the West, and the teachings Trungpa presented each year. He also describes his own personal spiritual journey with Chogyam Trungpa as a guide.

The Philosophy of Desire in the Buddhist Pali Canon

The Philosophy of Desire in the Buddhist Pali Canon

David Webster explores the notion of desire as found in the Buddhist Pali Canon. Beginning by addressing the idea of a 'paradox of desire', whereby we must desire to end desire, the varieties of desire that are articulated in the Pali texts are examined. A range of views of desire, as found in Western thought, are presented as well as Hindu and Jain approaches. An exploration of the concept of ditthi(view or opinion) is also provided, exploring the way in which 'holding views' can be seen as analogous to the process of desiring. Other subjects investigated include the mind-body relationship, the range of Pali terms for desire, and desire's positive spiritual value. A comparative exploration of the various approaches completes the work.

Glimpse of Abhidhamma

Glimpse of Abhidhamma

The Buddhist literary works tell us that Buddha identified this kingdom as a "world." The Abhidhamma engages in a critical analysis of not only the composition of this world (i.e., the mind and the body) but also in an assessment of one's accomplishments that is not merely to take a realistic view of one's metabolism but to realize the authentic dhamma of the dependent origination that takes a being through the cycle of birth and death called the Samsara.It is the noble doctrine of Abhidhamma that explains the performance of one's actions as a combination of mentality-materiality as follows:--Citta (consciousness)--Cetasikas (mental factors)--Rupa (form or body)--Synthesis and resultant effects--Nibbana (the end of the drama)