How to Be Black

How to Be Black

New York Times Bestseller Baratunde Thurston’s comedic memoir chronicles his coming-of-blackness and offers practical advice on everything from “How to Be the Black Friend” to “How to Be the (Next) Black President”. Have you ever been called “too black” or “not black enough”? Have you ever befriended or worked with a black person? Have you ever heard of black people? If you answered yes to any of these questions, this book is for you. It is also for anyone who can read, possesses intelligence, loves to laugh, and has ever felt a distance between who they know themselves to be and what the world expects. Raised by a pro-black, Pan-Afrikan single mother during the crack years of 1980s Washington, DC, and educated at Sidwell Friends School and Harvard University, Baratunde Thurston has more than over thirty years' experience being black. Now, through stories of his politically inspired Nigerian name, the heroics of his hippie mother, the murder of his drug-abusing father, and other revelatory black details, he shares with readers of all colors his wisdom and expertise in how to be black. “As a black woman, this book helped me realize I’m actually a white man.”—Patton Oswalt

Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?

What It Means to Be Black Now

Who's Afraid of Post-Blackness?

Drawing on his own experience, as well as interviews with more than 100 black Americans--including Henry Louis Gates Jr., Malcolm Gladwell, Chuck D, Soledad O-Brien, the Reverend Jesse Jackson, Aaron McGruder and more--the author explores what it means to be black in a post-2008 United States. By the author of Never Drank the Kool-Aid

Begging to Be Black

Begging to Be Black

In 1992, a gang leader was shot dead by an ANC member in Kroonstad. The murder weapon was then hidden on Antjie Krog’s stoep. In Begging to Be Black, Krog begins by exploring her position in this controversial case. From there the book ranges widely in scope, both in time - reaching back to the days of Basotho king Moshoeshoe - and in space - as we follow Krog’s experiences as a research fellow in Berlin, far from the Africa that produced her. Begging to Be Black is a book of journeys - moral, historical, philosophical and geographical. These form strands that Krog interweaves and sets in conversation with each other, as she explores questions of change and becoming, coherency and connectedness, before drawing them closer together as the book approaches its powerful end. Experimental and courageous, Begging to Be Black is a welcome addition to Krog’s own oeuvre and to South African literary non-fiction.

It's Good to Be Black

It's Good to Be Black

From the preface by Carmen Kenya Wadley: “Is it good to be black? To Ruby Berkley Goodwin it was....The black she writes about has nothing to do with skin color, but it does have a great deal to do with self images, values, spiritual strength, and most of all love. Unlike the contradicting definitions of blackness we see reflected in today's crime statistics, movies, television, newspapers, political speeches, advertisements, and sociological reports, Ruby Berkley Goodwin's definition of blackness is simple and to the point: black is good. It's Good to be Black is more than the story (history) of a black family living in Du Quoin, Illinois, during the early 1900s; it is a reaffirmation for all of us who know in our hearts that there is still good in the world and that some of that good is black.”

I'm a Man Who Happens to Be Black

I'm a Man Who Happens to Be Black

As a race, we can no longer hold the entire Caucasian race responsible for what their parents and grandparents did to our parents and grandparents because they had nothing to do with it. Through the actions of many men and women who happened to be white, I have learned that love has no color. Only racism, prejudice, and hate recognize color. We can't change the prejudice and attitudes of other people; we can change their attitudes by not living up to their prejudice. If we, as a human race, would forgive others just one-third of how much Jesus forgives us, there would be very little prejudice, racism, jealousy, and envy. As a race, many of must get out of this poverty mentality and realize that speaking proper English, getting an education and becoming successful are not limited to one race but open to all races. Many African Americans feel like they have to be defined by their race when in actuality, we should all be defined by our individuality. We have to come to the conclusion that we are one race; before we were defined by our color, we were the human race. We must understand that the best way to prove you are a man is to simply be a man. A real man doesn't feel like he has to prove he's a man, because he already knows he's a man.

Too White to be Black and too Black to be White: Living with Albinism

Too White to be Black and too Black to be White: Living with Albinism

This book takes a close look at the life of a black male living with albinism. It gives the reader insight as to what life can be like for a black male or female with albinism growing up within the black community and the impact public humiliation, intimidation, and ridicule can have on an individual long-term. In addition this book can serve as a guide to both parents and young adults who may know someone or may themselves may be dealing with the hardship(s) of living with albinism. I not only discuss my own experiences but also those of others who have had a great influence in my life.

To Be Black in America Is to Walk with Fury

To Be Black in America Is to Walk with Fury

A Vintage Shorts Original Selection Twenty years ago, the publication of Nathan McCall’s groundbreaking memoir Makes Me Wanna Holler chronicled a black man’s passage from a life on the block to the prison yards to a journalism career that led to The Washington Post. McCall’s survival had been an act of defiance against a culture and political system designed to keep black men down. Today, from the halls of a revered university, McCall gives thought to how many white Americans remain conditioned to racial blindness and can’t see their way out. Our country’s promise of equality continues to ring hollow, as young black men are murdered on our streets and constrained behind bars in astonishing numbers. In this timely, intimate essay, Nathan McCall reflects on what it means to stand tall and fashion life on one’s own terms, and urges us to recognize that what will make America great is not growing its wealth or might overseas, but doing right by its people at home. An eBook short.

Acting Black

College, Identity, and the Performance of Race

Acting Black

How different was it to be Black at an historically Black university versus a traditionally White one? Contains interviews with nearly sixty African-American men and women who either attended Northwestern University, a predominantly White school, or Howard University, a predominantly Black school, and reveals the intransigence of racism, the power of friendship, the difference of class inequality and the need for an identity that is stable and flexible. [publisher web site].

Madison Avenue and the Color Line

African Americans in the Advertising Industry

Madison Avenue and the Color Line

Until now, most works on the history of African Americans in advertising have focused on the depiction of blacks in advertisements. Madison Avenue and the Color Line breaks new ground by examining the history of black advertising agency employees and agency owners.