Introducing Moral Theology

True Happiness and the Virtues

Introducing Moral Theology

Whether in the cafeteria, classroom, or dorm lounge, questions abound on college campuses. Not only do students grapple with existential issues but they also struggle with ethical ones such as "Why be moral?" In Introducing Moral Theology, William Mattison addresses this question as well as grapples with the impact that religious belief has on day-to-day living. Structured in two parts, this unique text on Catholic moral theology covers cardinal virtues (temperance, prudence, fortitude, and justice) as well as theological virtues (faith, hope, and love). It is equipped with study questions, terms and their definitions, and illustrative case studies. Rooted in the Catholic tradition, this overview will also appeal to non-Catholics interested in virtue ethics.

Introduction to Moral Theology (Catholic Moral Thought, Volume 1)

Introduction to Moral Theology (Catholic Moral Thought, Volume 1)

The present volume, the first in the new Catholic Moral Thought series, responds to the need for a new introduction to the basic and central elements of Catholic moral theology written in the light of Veritatis splendor.

An Introduction to Moral Theology

An Introduction to Moral Theology

Offers a clear, complete and convincing examination and explanation of Catholic doctrine. It presents not only what the Church teaches, but also why it is obligated to do so, and why its members are obligated to examine and to apply that teaching. It offers the latest Catholic teaching on moral theoogy.

The Sermon on the Mount and Moral Theology

A Virtue Perspective

The Sermon on the Mount and Moral Theology

In this volume, William C. Mattison, III demonstrates that virtue ethics provides a helpful key for unlocking the moral wisdom of the Sermon on the Mount. Showing how familiar texts such as the Beatitudes and Petitions of the Lord's Prayer are more richly understood, and can even be aligned with the theological and cardinal virtues, he also locates in the Sermon classic topics in morality, such as the nature of happiness, intentionality, the intelligibility of human action, and the development of virtue. Yet far from merely placing the teaching of Aristotle in the mouth of Jesus, he demonstrates how the Sermon presents an account of happiness and virtue transformed in the light of Christian faith. The happiness portrayed is that of the Kingdom of heaven, and the habits needed to participate in it in the next life, but even initially in this one, are possible only by God's grace through Jesus Christ, and lived in the community that is the Church.

An Introduction To Moral Theology, 2nd Edition

An Introduction To Moral Theology, 2nd Edition

Faith & Morals Here - carefully documented, footnoted, and indexed - is not only what the Church teaches but also why it is obligated to do so. And, why its members are obligated to examine and to apply that teaching. This updated and expanded edition of a text long trusted and widely used in colleges, universities, and seminaries (as well as in high schools and parish religious-education programs), offers the latest Catholic teaching on moral theology, including: Moral theology: its nature, purpose, and biblical foundation Human dignity, free human action, virtue, and conscience Natural law, moral absolutes, and sin Christian faith and our moral life Read why - and how - living what the Church teaches can transform hearts, minds, and souls.

A History of Catholic Moral Theology in the Twentieth Century

From Confessing Sins to Liberating Consciences

A History of Catholic Moral Theology in the Twentieth Century

This is an historical survey of 20th Century Roman Catholic Theological Ethics (also known as moral theology). The thesis is that only through historical investigation can we really understand how the most conservative and negative field in Catholic theology at the beginning of the 20th could become by the end of the 20th century the most innovative one. The 20th century begins with moral manuals being translated into the vernacular. After examining the manuals of Thomas Slater and Henry Davis, Keenan then turns to three works and a crowning synthesis of innovation all developed before, during and soon after the Second World War. The first by Odon Lottin asks whether moral theology is adequately historical; Fritz Tillmann asks whether it's adequately biblical; and Gerard Gilleman, whether it's adequately spiritual. Bernard Haering integrates these contributions into his Law of Christ. Of course, people like Gerald Kelly and John Ford in the US are like a few moralists elsewhere, classical gate keepers, censoring innovation. But with Humanae vitae, and successive encyclicals, bishops and popes reject the direction of moral theologians. At the same time, moral theologians, like Josef Fuchs, ask whether the locus of moral truth is in continuous, universal teachings of the magisterium or in the moral judgment of the informed conscience. In their move toward a deeper appreciation of their field as forming consciences, they turn more deeply to local experience where they continue their work of innovation. Each continent subsequently gives rise to their own respondents: In Europe they speak of autonomy and personalism; in Latin America, liberation theology; in North America, Feminism and Black Catholic theology; and, in Asia and Africa a deep post-colonial interculturatism. At the end I assert that in its nature, theological ethics is historical and innovative, seeking moral truth for the conscience by looking to speak crossculturally.

Journal of Moral Theology, Volume 4, Number 2

Love, Redemption, Vocation, and the Church

Journal of Moral Theology, Volume 4, Number 2

Love, Redemption, Vocation, and the Church Volume 4, Number 2, June 2015 Edited by David M. McCarthy Roman Catholic Teaching on International Debt: Toward a New Methodology for Catholic Social Ethics and Moral Theology M. Therese Lysaught Narrative, Social Identity and Practical Reason: On Charles Taylor and Moral Theology Mark Ryan Hobbes Contra Bellarmine Matthew Rose Grace Is the Emotion of the Love of God Edward Collins Vacek No Woe to You Lawyers: A Virtue Ethics Approach To Happiness Within the Legal Profession John J. Fitzgerald Dignity and the Body: Reclaiming What Autonomy Ignores Joel J. Shuman and Brian Volck More Than Self-Gift and Sex: The Role of Receptivity in Catholic Marital Ethics Robert Ryan Review Essay on Catholic Higher Education: After Ex corde Ecclesiae Jason King

Renewing Moral Theology

Christian Ethics as Action, Character and Grace

Renewing Moral Theology

While ethical issues are being raised with new urgency, Christians are increasingly unfamiliar with the moral grammar of their faith. The need to reengage the deep-down things of the Christian moral tradition has seldom been more urgent. Moral theology has a long history in the Catholic and Anglican traditions. The tradition of theological ethics, influenced by Aristotle by way of Aquinas, offers a distinct emphasis on the virtues and character formation. Now Daniel Westberg infuses this venerable ethical tradition with a biblical confidence in the centrality of the gospel and the role of the Holy Spirit in forming character, while also laying down a sound moral psychology for practical reason and ethical living. Christians—whether of Anglican, Catholic or of other traditions—interested in vigorously retrieving a great moral heritage, will find here common ground for ethical reflection and discipleship.

Christ Alive in Us: An Introduction to Moral Theology

Christ Alive in Us: An Introduction to Moral Theology

This book follows the USCCB’s framework for “Life in Jesus Christ.” It is written by John Meinert and Emily Stimpson Chapman. Instead of explaining morality as a set of “thou shalt nots,” this book uses the Catechism and the Church Fathers to reframe morality in light of human freedom and the grace of God. The Challenges section in this book in particular will answer many common questions with which someone of high school age may struggle, including whether it is wrong to judge others and whether free will is truly free. About the series: The Formed in Christ series is a solid and faithful resource that provides a thorough treatment of the Catholic faith and the various branches of theology. Teachers may use this series to draw lessons for all core curriculum subjects in the USCCB’s doctrinal framework for high school level theology. Each book in the Formed in Christ series is written at a high school age-appropriate level and includes further reading from magisterial or other orthodox sources (ranging from the Church Fathers to books published within the last ten years), along with discussion and reflection questions. Also included in each book is a “challenges” section, which follows from the USCCB’s suggestions for apologetic topics for each course. The simple structure of the Formed in Christ series is meaningfully designed to allow teachers to build their own course or to use these books as a supplement. It means they can also be used by homeschoolers or religious educators, by the beginner armchair theologian, or by the college or high school student for independent or group study. The versatility inherent in these books means that they are not only for a high school classroom, but for anyone willing to put in the work to learn more about the truths of the faith.