IT Laws in the Era of Cloud-Computing

A Comparative Analysis between EU and US Law on the Case Study of Data Protection and Privacy

IT Laws in the Era of Cloud-Computing

Der Band dokumentiert die Ergebnisse und Empfehlungen einer Analyse zur Frage, wie sich IT-Gesetze entwickeln sollten, unter der Prämisse, dass die heutige und zukünftige Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologie durch Cloud Computing geprägt ist. Insbesondere entwickelt sich diese Untersuchung auf einer vergleichenden und einer interdisziplinären Achse, d.h. als Rechtsvergleich zwischen EU und US-Recht und interdisziplinär zwischen Recht und IT. Die Arbeit konzentriert sich auf den Schwerpunkt vom Datenschutz und Datensicherheit in Cloud-Umgebungen und analysiert drei Hauptherausforderungen auf dem Weg zu einer effizienteren Cloud-Computing-Regulierung: Verständnis der Gründe für die Entwicklung divergierender Rechtsordnungen und Denkschulen zum IT-Recht Gewährleistung der Privatsphäre und Datenschutz in der Cloud konvergierende Regulierungsansätze für die Cloud in der Hoffnung auf eine harmonisierte Landschaft von IT-Gesetzen in der Zukunft.

Cloud Technology: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications

Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications

Cloud Technology: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications

As the Web grows and expands into ever more remote parts of the world, the availability of resources over the Internet increases exponentially. Making use of this widely prevalent tool, organizations and individuals can share and store knowledge like never before. Cloud Technology: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications investigates the latest research in the ubiquitous Web, exploring the use of applications and software that make use of the Internet’s anytime, anywhere availability. By bringing together research and ideas from across the globe, this publication will be of use to computer engineers, software developers, and end users in business, education, medicine, and more.

Federal Cloud Computing

The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers

Federal Cloud Computing

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers offers an in-depth look at topics surrounding federal cloud computing within the federal government, including the Federal Cloud Computing Strategy, Cloud Computing Standards, Security and Privacy, and Security Automation. You will learn the basics of the NIST risk management framework (RMF) with a specific focus on cloud computing environments, all aspects of the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) process, and steps for cost-effectively implementing the Assessment and Authorization (A&A) process, as well as strategies for implementing Continuous Monitoring, enabling the Cloud Service Provider to address the FedRAMP requirement on an ongoing basis. Provides a common understanding of the federal requirements as they apply to cloud computing Provides a targeted and cost-effective approach for applying the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Risk Management Framework (RMF) Provides both technical and non-technical perspectives of the Federal Assessment and Authorization (A&A) process that speaks across the organization

Cybersecurity and Cyberwar

What Everyone Needs to Know®

Cybersecurity and Cyberwar

A generation ago, "cyberspace" was just a term from science fiction, used to describe the nascent network of computers linking a few university labs. Today, our entire modern way of life, from communication to commerce to conflict, fundamentally depends on the Internet. And the cybersecurity issues that result challenge literally everyone: politicians wrestling with everything from cybercrime to online freedom; generals protecting the nation from new forms of attack, while planning new cyberwars; business executives defending firms from once unimaginable threats, and looking to make money off of them; lawyers and ethicists building new frameworks for right and wrong. Most of all, cybersecurity issues affect us as individuals. We face new questions in everything from our rights and responsibilities as citizens of both the online and real world to simply how to protect ourselves and our families from a new type of danger. And yet, there is perhaps no issue that has grown so important, so quickly, and that touches so many, that remains so poorly understood. In Cybersecurity and CyberWar: What Everyone Needs to Know®, New York Times best-selling author P. W. Singer and noted cyber expert Allan Friedman team up to provide the kind of easy-to-read, yet deeply informative resource book that has been missing on this crucial issue of 21st century life. Written in a lively, accessible style, filled with engaging stories and illustrative anecdotes, the book is structured around the key question areas of cyberspace and its security: how it all works, why it all matters, and what can we do? Along the way, they take readers on a tour of the important (and entertaining) issues and characters of cybersecurity, from the "Anonymous" hacker group and the Stuxnet computer virus to the new cyber units of the Chinese and U.S. militaries. Cybersecurity and CyberWar: What Everyone Needs to Know® is the definitive account on the subject for us all, which comes not a moment too soon. What Everyone Needs to Know® is a registered trademark of Oxford University Press.

Privacy Protections for Personal Information Online

Privacy Protections for Personal Information Online

There is no comprehensive federal privacy statute that protects personal info. Instead, a patchwork of federal laws and regulations govern the collection and disclosure of personal info. and has been addressed by Congress on a sector-by-sector basis. Some contend that this is insufficient to meet the demands of today¿s technology. Contents of this report: (1) Background; (2) Federal Legal Framework for the Privacy of Online Personal Info.: Constitutional Protections; Statutory Protections; (3) The Federal Trade Comm. (FTC): FTC Enforcement Actions Concerning the Privacy of Personal Info.; (4) Recent Policy Initiatives; (5) Electronic Communications Privacy Act Reform. This is a print on demand report.

Planning for Big Data

Planning for Big Data

In an age where everything is measurable, understanding big data is an essential. From creating new data-driven products through to increasing operational efficiency, big data has the potential to make your organization both more competitive and more innovative. As this emerging field transitions from the bleeding edge to enterprise infrastructure, it's vital to understand not only the technologies involved, but the organizational and cultural demands of being data-driven. Written by O'Reilly Radar's experts on big data, this anthology describes: The broad industry changes heralded by the big data era What big data is, what it means to your business, and how to start solving data problems The software that makes up the Hadoop big data stack, and the major enterprise vendors' Hadoop solutions The landscape of NoSQL databases and their relative merits How visualization plays an important part in data work

Blockchain as both ICT and institutional technology

Blockchain as both ICT and institutional technology

Master's Thesis from the year 2019 in the subject Economics - Monetary theory and policy, grade: 2,0, University of Potsdam, language: English, abstract: This thesis explores and analyses the technical and economic factors that determine the potential of blockchain technology for economy and society and their interactions. At the technical level, blockchain technology is portrayed as a combination of different base technologies. It enables new, potentially disruptive applications by providing an efficient technical solution for the fundamental double-spending problem. Based on these findings, blockchain technology is analyzed regarding a new Techno-economic paradigm. However, this does not (yet) appear to be the case, at least from an isolated perspective. From an institutional economics perspective, blockchain technology proves to be a rule-based system and thus a basis for alternative institutions. On the one hand, these enable new forms of economic interaction and coordination and, on the other hand, these are subject to novel governance mechanisms. It turns out that these decentralized blockchain-based forms can lead to higher efficiency in systems that have been dependent on traditional intermediaries up to now due to lower transaction costs. In contrast, there emerge new intermediaries within the blockchain ecosystem, which reminds of traditional schemes.

Rise of the Robots

Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future

Rise of the Robots

The New York Times-bestselling guide to how automation is changing the economy, undermining work, and reshaping our lives Winner of Best Business Book of the Year awards from the Financial Times and from Forbes "Lucid, comprehensive, and unafraid...;an indispensable contribution to a long-running argument."--Los Angeles Times What are the jobs of the future? How many will there be? And who will have them? As technology continues to accelerate and machines begin taking care of themselves, fewer people will be necessary. Artificial intelligence is already well on its way to making "good jobs" obsolete: many paralegals, journalists, office workers, and even computer programmers are poised to be replaced by robots and smart software. As progress continues, blue and white collar jobs alike will evaporate, squeezing working- and middle-class families ever further. At the same time, households are under assault from exploding costs, especially from the two major industries-education and health care-that, so far, have not been transformed by information technology. The result could well be massive unemployment and inequality as well as the implosion of the consumer economy itself. The past solutions to technological disruption, especially more training and education, aren't going to work. We must decide, now, whether the future will see broad-based prosperity or catastrophic levels of inequality and economic insecurity. Rise of the Robots is essential reading to understand what accelerating technology means for our economic prospects-not to mention those of our children-as well as for society as a whole.

How to Fix Copyright

How to Fix Copyright

Do copyright laws directly cause people to create works they otherwise wouldn't create? Do those laws directly put substantial amounts of money into authors' pockets? Does culture depend on copyright? Are copyright laws a key driver of competitiveness and of the knowledge economy? These are the key questions William Patry addresses in How to Fix Copyright. We all share the goals of increasing creative works, ensuring authors can make a decent living, furthering culture and competitiveness and ensuring that knowledge is widely shared, but what role does copyright law actually play in making these things come true in the real world? Simply believing in lofty goals isn't enough. If we want our goals to come true, we must go beyond believing in them; we must ensure they come true, through empirical testing and adjustment. Patry argues that laws must be consistent with prevailing markets and technologies because technologies play a large (although not exclusive) role in creating consumer demand; markets then satisfy that demand. Patry discusses how copyright laws arose out of eighteenth-century markets and technology, the most important characteristic of which was artificial scarcity. Artificial scarcity was created by the existence of a small number gatekeepers, by relatively high barriers to entry, and by analog limitations on copying. Markets and technologies change, in a symbiotic way, Patry asserts. New technologies create new demand, requiring new business models. The new markets created by the Internet and digital tools are the greatest ever: Barriers to entry are low, costs of production and distribution are low, the reach is global, and large sums of money can be made off of a multitude of small transactions. Along with these new technologies and markets comes the democratization of creation; digital abundance is replacing analog artificial scarcity. The task of policymakers is to remake our copyright laws to fit our times: our copyright laws, based on the eighteenth century concept of physical copies, gatekeepers, and artificial scarcity, must be replaced with laws based on access not ownership of physical goods, creation by the masses and not by the few, and global rather than regional markets. Patry's view is that of a traditionalist who believes in the goals of copyright but insists that laws must match the times rather than fight against the present and the future.

Media Studies 2.0

Media Studies 2.0

Media Studies 2.0 offers an exploration of the digital revolution and its consequences for media and communication studies, arguing that the new era requires an upgraded discipline: a media studies 2.0. The book traces the history of mass-media and computing, exploring their merger at the end of the twenty-century and the material, ecological, cultural and personal elements of this digital transformation. It considers the history of media and communication studies, arguing that the academic discipline was a product of the analogue, broadcast-era, emerging in the early twentieth century as a response to the success of newspapers, radio and cinema and reflecting that era back in its organisation, themes and concepts. Digitalisation, however, takes us beyond this analogue era (media studies 1.0) into a new, post-broadcast era. Merrin argues that the digital-era demands an upgraded academic discipline: one reflecting the real media life of its students and teaching the key skills needed by the twenty-first century user. Media 2.0 demand a media studies 2.0 This original and critical overview of contemporary developments within media studies is ideal for general students of media and communication, as well as those specifically studying new and digital media.