Jesus Christ in Modern Thought

Jesus Christ in Modern Thought

Here, following the example of Rahner and Pannenberg, John Macquarrie examines Jesus Christ's humanity to his origin as God. Part one considers the New Testament sources, including the "classical theology" period. Part two examines the Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment critique of classical christology (i.e. studying Jesus Christ as him from above, as opposed to his humanity), while in part three, Macquarrie makes his own christological statement on who Jesus Christ really is for us today.

Christology Revisited

Christology Revisited

John Macquarrie "revisits" and expands his understanding of the person of Jesus Christ. He explores the issues of interpretation surrounding how we can "know" a person who lived 2000 years ago. He critiques certain controversial theologies which overemphasize either Jesus' divinity or humanity.

The Christology of the New Testament

The Christology of the New Testament

This book is invigorating to read, for it is how biblical theology should be written. Professor Cullmann has set a high standard of biblical scholarship in this book, and it will be a great resource for students of sacred Scripture.

Principles of Christian Theology

Principles of Christian Theology

This text poses the question "what is theology?" and goes on to discuss issues of methodology, the relation of theology to other disciplines and different theological perspectives. It also investigates topics in the fields of philosophical theology (human existence; revelation; the language of theology; and Christianity and other religions), symbolic theology (triune God; doctrines of creation; the problem of evil and suffering; the person of Jesus Christ; and eschatology) and applied theology (the Church; ministry and mission; word and the sacraments; worship and prayer; and ethics).

The Christology of John Macquarrie

The Christology of John Macquarrie

The Christology of John Macquarrie comprehensively scrutinizes the life and writings of Scottish-born systematic theologian and philosopher John Macquarrie (1919-2007) in an attempt to comprehend and evaluate his Christology. The author examines the people (e.g. Heidegger, Schleiermacher), the philosophical and theological positions, and the writings that formed Macquarrie’s thinking. One major influence was his commitment to modern critical theology including the premise that, in the modern world, the only acceptable Christological tenets are those that can stand up to the scrutiny of modern critical reasoning. The work concludes that this commitment profoundly shaped Macquarrie’s theology, especially his Christology. The book also discusses Macquarrie’s evaluation and criticisms of the Christology of other theologians (e.g. Kierkegaard, Moltmann, Pannenberg, and others), concluding that Macquarrie’s understanding of the Christian faith and the person of Jesus Christ is consonant with modern liberal Anglo-Catholicism. This idea furthers the argument that Macquarrie’s reluctance to accept traditional incarnational categories suggests that his Christology is a modern form of Adoptionism.

Re-Writing Jesus: Christ in 20th-Century Fiction and Film

Re-Writing Jesus: Christ in 20th-Century Fiction and Film

At the heart of Christian theology lies a paradox unintelligible to other religions and to secular humanism: that in the person of Jesus, God became man, and suffered on the cross to effect humanity's salvation. In his dual nature as mortal and divinity, and unlike the impassable God of other monotheisms, Christ thus became accessible to artistic representation. Hence the figure of Jesus has haunted and compelled the imagination of artists and writers for 2,000 years. This was never more so than in the 20th Century, in a supposedly secular age, when the Jesus of popular fiction and film became perhaps more familiar than the Christ of the New Testament. In Re-Writing Jesus: Christ in 20th Century Fiction and Film Graham Holderness explores how writers and film-makers have sought to recreate Christ in work as diverse as Anthony Burgess's Man of Nazareth and Jim Crace's Quarantine, to Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ and Mel Gibson's Passion of the Christ. These works are set within a longer and broader history of 'Jesus novels' and 'Jesus films', a lineage traced back to Ernest Renan and George Moore, and explored both for their reflections of contemporary Christological debates, and their positive contributions to Christian theology. In its final chapter, the book draws on the insights of this tradition of Christological representation to creatively construct a new life of Christ, an original work of theological fiction that both subsumes the history of the form, and offers a startlingly new perspective on the biography of Christ.

Christ, Faith and History

Cambridge Studies in Christology

Christ, Faith and History


Incarnation and Resurrection

Toward a Contemporary Understanding

Incarnation and Resurrection

For too long contemporary theology has downplayed the importance of holding together the incarnation and the resurrection when thinking theologically. Paul Molnar here surveys the place of these key doctrines in the thought of several influential theologians: Karl Barth, Karl Rahner, Thomas F. Torrance, John Macquarrie, Gordon Kaufman, Sallie McFague, Roger Haight, John Hick, and Wolfhart Pannenberg. Molnar demonstrates that whenever the starting point for interpreting the resurrection is not Jesus himself, the incarnate Son of the Father, then Christology and Soteriology are undermined because they are not properly rooted in a plausible doctrine of the Trinity. Fair, comprehensive, and balanced, Molnar's analysis, following Torrance and Barth, highlights the details of contemporary theology of the resurrection linked to the incarnation and maintains the necessity of the incarnation in its intrinsic unity with the resurrection as the beginning, rather than the end, of Christology.