Layman's Guide to Irish Law

An Introduction to the Irish Legal System

Layman's Guide to Irish Law

Maybe you have always had an interest in law, or the Irish Legal System, and just want a manageable book to start you off. Then an introduction to the Irish Legal System is the book for you. Have you ever wanted to know about the law in Ireland but every time you picked up any textbooks or even articles you were completely put off by the terminology.? Were you feeling that you would have to learn a whole new language just to be able to read it, let alone understand it.? Well look no further; my books are compiled so that all of the terminology, rules and principles are explained in plain English, leaving you to enjoy learning about the law in Ireland without the headache of terminology and confounding principles. Welcome to my series of law textbooks for beginners. When you first start reading law, the terminology (wording), doctrines (procedural steps, or tests) or principles (rules) can be overwhelming. This book has been compiled to give you a baseline introduction to the Irish Legal System, "the bones" you could call it, it is not intended to be a complete breakdown of Administrative and Constitutional law. It is a great starter book for those who are new to the subject of Irish law. This book covers topics such as the Irish court system, organs of state, legislative processes, lawyers, the common law, legislation, the European Union, human rights, legal theory, constitutional law and jurisprudence.

A Layman's Guide to Irish Law

An Introduction to Company Law in Ireland

A Layman's Guide to Irish Law

This Introduction to Company law book provides a basic introduction to small private limited companies and requires no previous legal knowledge. The book is ideal for those who wish to acquire a general understanding of how small companies in Ireland are run. The narrative is clear, concise and accessible, and will give the reader a good, basic appreciation of the Company law in Ireland. Topics covered include company formation and administration, the roles of directors and shareholders, company finance, common legal problems, Employment law and the Law of Agency.

Layman's Guide to Irish Law

The Law of Contract

Layman's Guide to Irish Law

Legal writing in plain English. Law books using plain English which is easy to understand using clear concise plain wording.Welcome to my series of law textbooks for beginners. Have you ever wanted to know about the law in Ireland but every time you picked up any textbooks or even articles you were completely put off by the terminology and feeling that you would have to learn a whole new language just to be able to read it, let alone understand it.? Well look no further; my books are compiled so that all of the terminology, rules and principles are explained in plain English, leaving you to enjoy learning about the law in Ireland without the headache of terminology and confounding principles.Welcome to my series of law textbooks for beginners. When you first start studying law the terminology (wording) or principles (rules) can be overwhelming, I have been teaching law for over 7 years and in that time I have taught mainly beginner or entry level students who have had some difficulty in the early stages of study and even faltering due to this whole new language which is the law, this textbook series was put together to help you to put the principles and terminology in plain English (ride with stabilisers) until such time as you are ready to revert to the terminology in the knowledge that you are more confident and knowledgeable and ready to ride that bike without stabilisers.The Law of ContractEvery day we enter contracts, most of those contracts are subconsciously entered into and we are rarely aware of the intrinsic nature of a contract and all of the essential elements which must be fulfilled in order to have a legally binding and enforceable contract, we simply take the law of contract for granted. Simply buying a bottle of water or your morning coffee affords the same legal principles as buying a car or entering into a million euro business deal. Contracts do not need to be in writing to be enforceable, on the contrary, if you were to have a written contract every time you went to the shop for a paper or to buy a coffee there would be some very long queue's as you would have to write the terms of the contract down and sign it, time consuming and frivolous as very little actually selling would be done due to the time which it would take per person to put all of the essential elements of a contract in writing. There are some contracts which require a written and signed deed (written document or agreement) mainly the sale and purchase of land, property, commercial property and loans.If you are buying or selling something of course you can request that this sale or purchase be written down, you can set your own rules and as long as they are not breaching any legal rules or legislation and the other persons signs then you can pretty much set out whatever rules you want, however for most sales or purchases this is a formality and not a requirement for the contract to be binding on both parties. Agreements create obligations. Therefore, any agreement that is enforceable in a court of law is a contract and no person should be bound unless they have given their informed and true consent to the contract.

Vengeance in the Middle Ages

Emotion, Religion and Feud

Vengeance in the Middle Ages

This volume aims to balance the traditional literature available on medieval feuding with an exploration of other aspects of vengeance and culture in the Middle Ages. A diverse assortment of interdisciplinary essays from scholars in Europe and North America contest or enlarge traditional approaches to and interpretations of vengeance in the Middle Ages. Each essay attempts to clarify the multifaceted experience of vengeance within a specific medieval context”a particular region, a particular text, a particular social movement. By asking what relationship a distinct factor like authorship or religion has with the concept of vengeance, each author points towards the breadth of meanings of medieval vengeance, and to the heart of the deeper and broader questions that spur scholarly interest in the subject. Geographically, the essays in the volume highlight Western Europe (particularly the Anglo-Norman world), Scotland, Ireland, Spain, and Portugal. Thematically, the essays are concerned with heroic cultures of vengeance, vengeance as a legal and political tool, Christian justification and expression of vengeance, literature and the distinction between discourse and reality, and the emotions of vengeance. Methodologically, these interdisciplinary studies incorporate tools borrowed from anthropology, the study of emotion, and modern social and literary theories. This volume is aimed at professional scholars and graduate students within the broad field of medieval studies, including the subfields of history, literature, and religious studies, and is intended to inspire further research on medieval vengeance. However, this collection will also prove interesting to non-medievalists interested in the history of emotion, the justification of human conflict, and the concept of feud and its applicability to specific historical periods.

Early Medieval Ireland, 400-1200

Early Medieval Ireland, 400-1200

Within a broad political framework this impressive survey explores the nature of Irish society, the spiritual and secular roles of the Church and the extraordinary flowering of Irish culture in the period. Other major themes are Ireland's relations with Britain and Europe, and Vikings and their influence, the beginnings of Irish feudalism, and the impact of the Viking and Norman invaders.

The Proprietary Church in the Medieval West

The Proprietary Church in the Medieval West

Although there have been many regional studies of the proprietary church or particular aspects of it, this is the first extensive study of it covering most of western Europe, from the end of the Roman Empire in the West to about 1200. The book aims at a broad survey in varying degrees of intensity and with a shifting geographical focus; and it asks questions that are as much social and religious as legal or administrative.The book vindicates, for village and estate churches, Ulrich Stutz's basic concept of a church with its possessions, revenues, and priestly office as an object of what we can reasonably call property. But it largely rejects his and his followers' application of this to great churches, and sees the position of intermediate churches (such as small or middling monasteries) as various, changeable, and ambivalent. Above all it turns away from Stutz's view of the property relationship as a distinctinstitution or system of 'Germanic church law', presenting it rather as a fluid set of assumptions and practices taking shape as customary law.The book considers also the changing background of ideas and the bearing on it of important polemical writings (with some questioning of their established interpretations). Finally the book discusses how property in churches was imperfectly superseded by the new canon-law patronage, in the increasingly bureaucratic post-Gregorian Church.

Lawyers and Laymen

Studies in the History of Law Presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on His Seventy-fifth Birthday, Gŵyl Ddewi 1986

Lawyers and Laymen

This collection of studies and edited texts is being offered to Professor Dafydd Jenkins as an appreciation of his contribution to the study of legal history and especially of Welsh medieval law. This contribution lies not only in his own published works but in the constant support which he has given to younger scholars over many years. The volume falls into two parts. The first part is concerned with a principal area of Welsh medieval law, Suretyship. The second contains studies on a wider variety of topics including Welsh, English, and European legal history.