The Rise of the Counter-establishment

The Conservative Ascent to Political Power

The Rise of the Counter-establishment

Throughout history, behind so many de facto rulers, there can often be found a shadowy puppet-master pulling the strings. Using examples from Machiavelli, Catherine de Medici and Alexander Hamilton to Dick Cheney, Zhou Enlai and Joseph Stalin, Kerwin Swint presents profiles of notorious king whisperers," spanning the globe and historical periods, showing how they employed unique styles of power politics to wrest control. From spies, silver-tongued devils and the truly evil, this is a brilliant tapestry of behind-the-scenes schemers of all shapes and sizes.

The Neoconservative Revolution

Jewish Intellectuals and the Shaping of Public Policy

The Neoconservative Revolution

This book which will come as a surprise to many educated observers and historians suggests that Jews and Jewish intellectuals have played a considerable role in the development and shaping of modern American conservatism. The focus is on the rise of a group of Jewish intellectuals and activists known as neoconservatives who began to impact on American public policy during the Cold War with the Soviet Union and most recently in the lead up to and invasion of Iraq. It presents a portrait of the life and work of the original and small group of neocons including Irving Kristol, Norman Podhoretz, and Sidney Hook. This group has grown into a new generation who operate as columnists in conservative think tanks like The Heritage and The American Enterprise Institute, at colleges and universities, and in government in the second Bush Administration including such lightning rod figures as Paul Wolfowitz, Richard Perle and Elliot Abrams. The book suggests the neo cons have been so significant in reshaping modern American conservatism and public policy that they constitute a Neoconservative Revolution.

TEACHING SURGEONS' HANDS TO HEAL

TEACHING SURGEONS' HANDS TO HEAL

Nineteen sixty nine to nineteen ninety three: what a time of change, development and innovation in Medicine. Often not appreciated are the many advances coming directly or indirectly from the University of Minnesota Medical School, the main setting for "Teaching Surgeon's Hands to Heal" by Dr Elwin Fraley MD. Dr Christiaan Barnard had recently performed the first human heart transplant in South Africa, yet the basis for this magnificent achievement was the training and experience he had in Minnesota, under the great open-heart surgery pioneer Dr Walt Lillehei. This was the background that the young, relatively inexperienced Dr Fraley had, when given the opportunity to develop a world class Department of Urologic Surgery in 1969. With his intense personal belief as a "Builder of People" Dr Fraley accepted the challenge with drive, determination and his own inimitable energy and wit - overcoming numerous difficulties along the way. Set in an academic research and training hospital the chronicle details not only the development of the training program, but rather how it produced so many luminaries in the field, who then followed his tradition of building leaders and innovators. This book highlights the importance of academic centers to the future of American and world medicine, as well as mankind in general. Indeed, under Dr Fraley, there was a paradigm shift from enormous painful surgical incisions to key-hole surgery, the field of Endourology (a term coined by Dr Fraley). Thus Endourology is now an integral part of virtually all major urological meetings around the world.

Diary as Fiction

Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground and Turgenev's "Diary of a Superfluous Man"

Diary as Fiction

There is a genre of literature in which the work is purposely written within the diary format; this type of writings known as diary fiction. Diary novels traditionally reflect what the authors think real diaries are or are written as a parody of the diary as a negative model. The authors of diary novels choose the diary form because its artistic quality expresses a greater sense of immediacy to the reader than other forms of literature. The diary novel emphasizes the time of writing rather than the time that it is written about, so the diarist usually writes about events of the immediate past - events that occur between one entry and the next - or records his momentary ideas, reflections, or emotions. Turgenev's "Diary of a Superfluous Man" represents the marriage of a memoir and a diary, resulting in a work with more contemporaneous content than recounting of memories: a diary novel. Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground presents an interesting variation of the diary novel, which is devoid of any dated entries. Instead, it is divided into two parts. In the first part the narrator describes his present life and philosophical ideas. In the second half, he recounts the past. Therefore, like Turgenev's work, Notes from Underground combines aspects of the memoir and diary novel genre, but the overriding existence of real or present time writing, supports the sole diary novel classification.

The Devil Knows Latin

Why America Needs the Classical Tradition

The Devil Knows Latin

The Devil Knows Latin is a provocative and illuminating examination of contemporary American culture. Its range is broad and fascinating. Whether discussing the importance of Greek and Latin syntax to our society, examining current trends in literary theory, education, and politics, or applying a classical perspective to contemporary films, Christian Kopff (Professor of Classics at the University of Colorado) is at home and on the mark. He outlines the perils and possibilities for America in the coming decades with learning and verve—demonstrating that the highway to a creative and free future begins as a Roman road.

Out of Step

Out of Step


Independent Intellectuals in the United States, 1910-1945

Independent Intellectuals in the United States, 1910-1945

A new intellectual community came together in the United States in the 1910s and 1920s, a community outside the universities, the professions and, in general, the established centers of intellectual life. A generation of young intellectuals was increasingly challenging both the genteel tradition and the growing division of intellectual labor. Adversarial and anti-professional, they exhibited a hostility to boundaries and specialization that compelled them toward an ambitious and self-conscious generalism and made them a force in the American political, literary, and artistic landscape. This book is a cultural history of this community of free-lance critics and an exploration of their collective effort to construct a viable public intellectual life in America. Steven Biel illustrates the diversity of the body of writings produced by these critics, whose subjects ranged from literature and fine arts to politics, economics, history, urban planning, and national character. Conceding that significant differences and conflicts did exist in the works of individual thinkers, Biel nonetheless maintains that a broader picture of this vibrant culture has been obscured by attempts to classify intellectuals according to political or ideological persuasions. His book brings to life the ways in which this community sought out alternative ways of making a living, devised strategies for reaching and engaging the public, debated the involvement of women in the intellectual community and incorporated Marxism into its evolving search for a decisive intellectual presence in American life. Examined in this lively study are the role and contributions of such figures as Randolph Bourne, Max Eastman, Crystal Eastman, Walter Lippmann, Margaret Sanger, Van Wyck Brooks, Floyd Dell, Edmund Wilson, Mable Dodge, Paul Rosenfeld, H. L. Mencken, Lewis Mumford, Malcolm Cowley, Matthew Josephson, John Reed, Waldo Frank, Gilbert Seldes, and Harold Stearns.

George Santayana's Marginalia

A Critical Selection

George Santayana's Marginalia

In his essay "Imagination," George Santayana writes, "There are books in which the footnotes, or the comments scrawled by some reader's hand in the margins, may be more interesting than the text." Santayana himself was an inveterate maker of notes in the margins of his books, writing (although neatly, never scrawling) comments that illuminate, contest, or interestingly expand the author's thought. These volumes offer a selection of Santayana's marginalia, transcribed from books in his personal library. These notes give the reader an unusual perspective on Santayana's life and work. He is by turns critical (often), approving (seldom), literary, slangy, frivolous, and even spiteful. The notes show his humor, his occasional outcry at a writer's folly, his concern for the niceties of English prose and the placing of Greek accent marks. These two volumes list alphabetically by author all the books extant that belonged to Santayana, reproducing a selection of his annotations intended to be of use to the reader or student of Santayana's thought, his art, and his life. Each entry includes a headnote with the author's name, the title of the work, brief publication information, and the library location of the book. Not all marginalia from a given text is included; the notes have been selected for content and style. [cut last sentence; cut entire paragraph if nec.] Santayana, often living in solitude, spent a great deal of his time talking to, and talking back to, a wonderful miscellany of writers, from Spinoza to Kant to J. S. Mill to Bertrand Russell. These notes document those conversations.