Molecules of Murder

Criminal Molecules and Classic Cases

Molecules of Murder

Molecules of Murder is about infamous murderers and famous victims; about people like Harold Shipman, Alexander Litvinenko, Adelaide Bartlett, and Georgi Markov. Few books on poisons analyse these crimes from the viewpoint of the poison itself, doing so throws a new light on how the murders or attempted murders were carried out and ultimately how the perpetrators were uncovered and brought to justice. Part I includes molecules which occur naturally and were originally used by doctors before becoming notorious as murder weapons. Part II deals with unnatural molecules, mainly man-made, and they too have been dangerously misused in famous crimes. The book ends with the most famous poisoning case in recent years, that of Alexander Litvinenko and his death from polonium chloride. The first half of each chapter starts by looking at the target molecule itself, its discovery, its history, its chemistry, its use in medicine, its toxicology, and its effects on the human body. The second half then investigates a famous murder case and reveals the modus operandi of the poisoner and how some were caught, some are still at large, and some literally got away with murder. Molecules of Murder will explain how forensic chemists have developed cunning ways to detect minute traces of dangerous substances, and explain why some of these poisons, which appear so life-threatening, are now being researched as possible life-savers. Award winning science writer John Emsley has assembled another group of true crime and chemistry stories to rival those of his highly acclaimed Elements of Murder.

More Molecules of Murder

More Molecules of Murder

How can a plant as beautiful as the foxglove be so deadly and yet for more than a century be used to treat heart disease? The same is true of other naturally occurring molecules as will be revealed in this current book by award-winning author and chemist, John Emsley. More Molecules of Murder follows on from his highly-acclaimed earlier book Molecules of Murder, and again it deals with 14 potential poisons; seven of which are man-made and seven of which are natural. It investigates the crimes committed with them, not from the point of view of the murderers, their victims, or the detectives, but from the poison used. In so doing it throws new light on how these crimes were carried out and ultimately how the perpetrators were uncovered and brought to justice. Each chapter starts by looking at the target molecule itself, its discovery, its chemistry, its often-surprising use in medicine, its effects on the human body, and its toxicology. The rest of the chapter is devoted to murders and attempted murders in which it has been used. But, be reassured that murder by poison is not the threat it once was, thanks to laws which restrict access to such materials and to the skills of analytical chemists in detecting their presence in incredibly tiny amounts.

Molecules of Murder Set

Molecules of Murder Set

How can a plant as beautiful as the foxglove be so deadly and yet for more than a century be used to treat heart disease? The same is true of other naturally occurring molecules as will be revealed in these two books from award-winning author and chemist, John Emsley. Molecules of Murder and More Molecules of Murder deal with potential poisons from man-made and natural sources. Both books investigate the crimes committed with them, not from the point of view of the murderers, their victims, or the detectives, but from the poison used. In so doing the books throw new light on how these crimes were carried out and ultimately how the perpetrators were uncovered and brought to justice. The crimes include those committed by infamous murderers and also famous victims like Harold Shipman, Alexander Litvinenko and Georgi Markov. Each chapter starts by looking at the target molecule itself, its discovery, its chemistry, its often-surprising use in medicine, its effects on the human body, and its toxicology. The rest of the chapter is devoted to murders and attempted murders in which it has been used. But, be reassured that murder by poison is not the threat it once was, thanks to laws which restrict access to such materials and to the skills of analytical chemists in detecting their presence in incredibly tiny amounts.

Murder, Magic, and Medicine

Murder, Magic, and Medicine

People have always been curious about the plants and animals with which they coexist. Primitive cultures identified edible and poisonous plants largely by trial and error, and then used them for hunting, executions, euthanasia, and magico-religious rites, as well as for their medicinalproperties. In this fascinating book, John Mann investigates the evolution of modern medicine from its roots in folk medicine, and reveals the continuing importance of natural plant and animal products, many of which remain undiscovered but under threat by the wholesale destruction of the Earth'swild places. In this new edition, he has updated the material to include discussion of the background to some of the most talked-about drugs of recent years, including Prozac and Viagra. 'This is an erudite treasure trove in which each page sparkles with a concoction of historical anecdote andscientific revelation.' The Good Book Guide 'The book is peppered throughout with the legend, superstition and science of bygone ages, and interesting reading they make.' New Scientist 'This highly entertaining account investigates the evolution of modern medicines. ...Professor Mann does it withgreat style.' The Lancet '... an excellent introductory text for those not liable to dizziness as they jump from one culture to another, or one century to the next. ' Nature '... provides intelligent material for those advocating conservation of our global plant resources because of theirpotentially important reservoir of therapeutically active chemicals for animal and human disease.' The Times Higher Education Supplement 'Delightfully rich... buy and read Mann's wonderful book.' Chemical and Engineering News

Chemistry in Primetime and Online

Communicating Chemistry in Informal Environments: Workshop Summary

Chemistry in Primetime and Online

It is critical that we increase public knowledge and understanding of science and technology issues through formal and informal learning for the United States to maintain its competitive edge in today's global economy. Since most Americans learn about science outside of school, we must take advantage of opportunities to present chemistry content on television, the Internet, in museums, and in other informal educational settings. In May 2010, the National Academies' Chemical Sciences Roundtable held a workshop to examine how the public obtains scientific information informally and to discuss methods that chemists can use to improve and expand efforts to reach a general, nontechnical audience. Workshop participants included chemical practitioners (e.g., graduate students, postdocs, professors, administrators); experts on informal learning; public and private funding organizations; science writers, bloggers, publishers, and university communications officers; and television and Internet content producers. Chemistry in Primetime and Online is a factual summary of what occurred in that workshop. Chemistry in Primetime and Online examines science content, especially chemistry, in various informal educational settings. It explores means of measuring recognition and retention of the information presented in various media formats and settings. Although the report does not provide any conclusions or recommendations about needs and future directions, it does discuss the need for chemists to connect more with professional writers, artists, or videographers, who know how to communicate with and interest general audiences. It also emphasizes the importance of formal education in setting the stage for informal interactions with chemistry and chemists.

Poisons and Murder Set

Poisons and Murder Set

How can a plant as beautiful as the foxglove be so deadly and yet for more than a century be used to treat heart disease? The same is true of other naturally occurring molecules as will be revealed in these three books which examine poisons, both natural and man-made, and the crimes committed with them, not from the point of view of the murderers, their victims, or the detectives, but from the poison used. Molecules of Murder: Criminal Molecules and Classic Cases, More Molecules of Murder and Poisons and Poisonings: Death by Stealth throw new light on how these crimes were carried out, how the perpetrators were uncovered and brought to justice and information about how forensic analysis is conducted. Appealing to scientists and non-scientists alike, these enthralling books will entertain and educate and bring the reader up to date with how important chemical analysis is in crime detection.

The Carbon Murder

A Periodic Table Mystery

The Carbon Murder

Gloria Lamerino's goddaughter, Mary Catherine Galigani ("MC" to her friends), needs a change in her life. She decides to move back to her hometown of Revere, Massachusetts, thereby ridding herself of both an abusive relationship and an unfulfilling job in Houston, Texas. At least that's the plan. When two homicides disrupt MC's peaceful return to Revere, Gloria applies her not inconsiderable detecting skills to help the police solve the crimes. At the same time, Gloria must face the medical problems of her partner, Detective Matt Gennaro, and the next steps in their relationship. In this sixth periodic table mystery, Gloria delves behind the scenes into the worlds of nanotechnology and show horses, and unwittingly uncovers a crime ring larger than the distance between Texas and Massachusetts.

Murder in Dealey Plaza

What We Know that We Didn't Know Then about the Death of JFK

Murder in Dealey Plaza

We now know vastly more about the killing of John F. Kennedy than was known 20 or 30 years ago, and new evidence is accumulating almost every day. This new evidence is being uncovered by the bold application of scientific and technological expertise to the assassination records, including the film, photographic, and autopsy records. Murder in Dealey Plaza presents the latest and best of the new assassination research. As a result of these freshly uncovered findings, it is possible to say with moral certainty and considerable scientific authority that the murder of President Kennedy was committed by a meticulously executed conspiracy which was then observed by an extensive cover-up.

Masterpieces of Murder

An Edmund Pearson True Crime Reader

Masterpieces of Murder