New Londoners

Reflections on Home

New Londoners

A collection of images and writing by young refugees, who have been mentored by established and emerging London-based professional photographers.

The New Londoners

The New Londoners

The New Londoners is a powerful celebration of London's unique cultural richness, and of the diversity that is the hallmark of this great and fascinating city. Over the last four years leading British photographer Chris Steele-Perkins has photographed and interviewed 164 families from 188 different countries, all of whom have made their homes in London. These are beautiful and powerful portraits, with each family photographed in their homes. Through insightful interviews we learn of the varied experiences of these families from across the globe.

New London

New London

Home to whaling ships, privateers, and submarines, New London has been at the heart of some of America's most exciting seafaring history. This volume spans 65 years of life in New London: from the 1850s, when the Whaling City earned its reputation, to the days before World War I, when the last whaler had departed and the first submarine was about to arrive. Through these pages, you will walk the city's unpaved streets to forgotten places like Bacon's Hotel and the Old Yellow Building, ride the trolley up State Street, and see Ocean Beach as it was before the 1938 hurricane swept it away. New London also gives special attention to the fashionable Pequot Colony, the trains and steamboats that traveled to and from the city, and familiar landmarks such as Union Station, the Nathan Hale Schoolhouse, and the Olde Town Mill. Home to whaling ships, privateers, and submarines, New London has been at the heart of some of America's most exciting seafaring history. This volume spans 65 years of life in New London: from the 1850s, when the Whaling City earned its reputation, to the days before World War I, when the last whaler had departed and the first submarine was about to arrive. Through these pages, you will walk the city's unpaved streets to forgotten places like Bacon's Hotel and the Old Yellow Building, ride the trolley up State Street, and see Ocean Beach as it was before the 1938 hurricane swept it away. New London also gives special attention to the fashionable Pequot Colony, the trains and steamboats that traveled to and from the city, and familiar landmarks such as Union Station, the Nathan Hale Schoolhouse, and the Olde Town Mill.

For Adam's Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England

For Adam's Sake: A Family Saga in Colonial New England

“Incomparably vivid . . . as enthralling a portrait of family life [in colonial New England] as we are likely to have.”—Wall Street Journal In the tradition of Laurel Thatcher Ulrich’s classic, A Midwife’s Tale, comes this groundbreaking narrative by one of America’s most promising colonial historians. Joshua Hempstead was a well-respected farmer and tradesman in New London, Connecticut. As his remarkable diary—kept from 1711 until 1758—reveals, he was also a slave owner who owned Adam Jackson for over thirty years. In this engrossing narrative of family life and the slave experience in the colonial North, Allegra di Bonaventura describes the complexity of this master/slave relationship and traces the intertwining stories of two families until the eve of the Revolution. Slavery is often left out of our collective memory of New England’s history, but it was hugely impactful on the central unit of colonial life: the family. In every corner, the lines between slavery and freedom were blurred as families across the social spectrum fought to survive. In this enlightening study, a new portrait of an era emerges.

The Whaling City

A History of New London

The Whaling City

From its beginnings New London's history is bound to the sea. Income from the whaling industry alone was fabulous. Yet the history of this unusual city at the mouth of the Thames, is one of many endeavors. Robert Decker has brought it all together, the pulse, the life, the excitement of a community over 325 years old. Illuminated by more than 150 photographs, documented with detailed reference material, there is high interest for both layman and scholar.

"Eighth Sister No More"

The Origins and Evolution of Connecticut College

When founded in 1911, Connecticut College for Women was a pioneering women’s college that sought to prepare the progressive era’s «new woman» to be self-sufficient. Despite a path-breaking emphasis on preparation for work in the new fields opening to women, Connecticut College and its peers have been overlooked by historians of women’s higher education. This book makes the case for the significance of Connecticut College’s birth and evolution, and contextualizes the college in the history of women’s education. «Eighth Sister No More» examines Connecticut College for Women’s founding mission and vision, revealing how its grassroots founding to provide educational opportunity for women was altered by coeducation; how the college has been shaped by changes in thinking about women’s roles and alterations in curricular emphasis; and the role local community ties played at the college’s point of origin and during the recent presidency of Claire Gaudiani, the only alumna to lead the college. Examining Connecticut College’s founding in the context of its evolution illustrates how founding mission and vision inform the way colleges describe what they are and do, and whether there are essential elements of founding mission and vision that must be remembered or preserved. Drawing on archival research, oral history interviews, and seminal works on higher education history and women’s history, «Eighth Sister No More» provides an illuminating view into the liberal arts segment of American higher education.

WJEC AS Geography Student Unit Guide New Edition: Unit G2 Changing Human Environments

WJEC AS Geography Student Unit Guide New Edition: Unit G2 Changing Human Environments

Endorsed by WJEC and written by experienced examiners David Burtenshaw and Sue Warn, this WJEC AS Geography Student Unit Guide is the essential study companion for Unit G2: Changing Human Environments.This full-colour book includes all you need to know to prepare for your unit exam: clear guidance on the content of the unit, with topic summaries, knowledge check questions and a quick-reference index exam advice throughout, so you will know what to expect in the exam and will be able to demonstrate the skills required exam-style questions, with graded student responses, so you can see clearly what is required to get a better grade

Attack on London

Disaster, Riot and War

Attack on London

Generations of Londoners from Roman times to the present day have confronted natural and man-made threats to their city. Jonathan Oates recalls in vivid detail the perils Londoners have faced and describes how they coped with them.