Not Wrong Just Different

Observations on the Rise of Contemporary Australian Theatre

Not Wrong Just Different

A collection of writings and commentary from Australia's foremost theatre writer and Currency Press founder. 'Not Wrong Just Different' traces the development of theatre in Australia from the time that Katharine Brisbane joined the staff of the fledgling Australian in mid-1967 as its national theatre critic. The book is divided into easily navigable sections, which consist of her columns from the Australian, Theatre Australia and The National Times. From Brecht to Barry Humphries, from Chekhov to Patrick White, Katharine Brisbane's lucid account of Australian theatre is comprehensively presented in this original collection. A dedicated observer and chronicler of the arts in Australia, Katharine Brisbane is a compelling voice for our times and her book highlights the force of the arts, and especially the theatre, in civil society; demonstrating the capacity of theatre to show us who we are. Equally importantly the book is about journalism and the influence of a larrikin national newspaper in providing a forum for a national conversation at a time of turbulence and change.

The Cambridge History of Australian Literature

The Cambridge History of Australian Literature

Draws on scholarship from leading figures in the field and spans Australian literary history from colonial origins, indigenous and migrant literatures, as well as representations of Asia and the Pacific and the role of literary culture in modern Australian society.

Loading the Silence: Australian Sound Art in the Post-Digital Age

Loading the Silence: Australian Sound Art in the Post-Digital Age

The experimentalist phenomenon of 'noise' as constituting 'art' in much twentieth-century music (paradoxically) reached its zenith in Cage’s (’silent’ piece) 4’33 . But much post-1970s musical endeavour with an experimentalist telos, collectively known as 'sound art', has displayed a postmodern need to ’load’ modernism’s ’degree zero’. After contextualizing experimentalism from its inception in the early twentieth century, Dr Linda Kouvaras’s Loading the Silence: Australian Sound Art in the Post-Digital Age explores the ways in which selected sound art works demonstrate creatively how sound is embedded within local, national, gendered and historical environments. Taking Australian music as its primary - but not sole - focus, the book not only covers discussions of technological advancement, but also engages with aesthetic standpoints, through numerous interviews, theoretical developments, analysis and cultural milieux for a contemporary Australian, and wider postmodern, context. Developing new methodologies for synergies between musicology and cultural studies, the book uncovers a new post-postmodern aesthetic trajectory, which Kouvaras locates as developing over the past two decades - the altermodern. Australian sound art is here put firmly on the map of international debates about contemporary music, providing a standard reference and valuable resource for practitioners in the artform, music critics, scholars and educators.

Radical Visions 1968-2008

The Impact of the Sixties on Australian Drama

Radical Visions 1968-2008

Radical Visions 1968-2008: The Impact of the Sixties on Australian Drama is about a generation of Australian playwrights who came of age in the sixties. This important book shows how international trends in youth radicalism and cultural change at the time contributed to the rise of interest in alternative theatre and drama in a number of locations. It follows the career of AustraliaOCOs major playwrights OCo Alma De Groen, Jenny Kemp, Richard Murphet, John Romeril, Stephen Sewell and David Willamson OCo whose early plays were first performed at La Mama and the Pram Factory theatres in Melbourne in the sixties and seventies and who continue to make new work. The bookOCOs dual purpose is to examine the impact of the sixties on playwriting and update the scholarship on the contemporary works with close readings of the plays of the nineties and the first decade of the twenty-first century. By analysing the recent plays, the book traces the continuing impact of left wing politics and cultural change on Australian theatre and society."

Transnational Protest, Australia and the 1960s

Transnational Protest, Australia and the 1960s

Australia is rarely considered to have been a part of the great political changes that swept the world in the 1960s: the struggles of the American civil rights movement, student revolts in Europe, guerrilla struggles across the Third World and demands for women’s and gay liberation. This book tells the story of how Australian activists from a diversity of movements read about, borrowed from, physically encountered and critiqued overseas manifestations of these rebellions, as well as locating the impact of radical visitors to the nation. It situates Australian protest and reform movements within a properly global – and particularly Asian – context, where Australian protestors sought answers, utopias and allies. Dramatically broadens our understanding of Australian protest movements, this book presents them not only as manifestations of local issues and causes but as fundamentally tied to ideas, developments and personalities overseas, particularly to socialist states and struggles in near neighbours like Vietnam, Malaysia and China.'Jon Piccini is Research and Teaching Fellow at The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. His research interests include the history of human rights and social histories of international student migration.'

The Athenæum

A Journal of Literature, Science, the Fine Arts, Music, and the Drama

The Athenæum


The Athenaeum

Journal of Literature, Science, the Fine Arts, Music and the Drama

The Athenaeum