Percussion Grenade

Percussion Grenade

Rat-a-tat prosody and scattershot, hallucinatory cultural critique, replete with grotesqueries, spit baroquely from the necropastoral ground of McSweeney's third collection.

Trench Warfare, 1850–1950

Trench Warfare, 1850–1950

Although many books have been published about the Western Front, few of them look beyond the Great War to consider trench warfare in a wider historical context. Trench warfare was not an aberration of the Western Front. On the contrary, it was a watershed in a greater upheaval in warfare which started in the 1850s and continued well beyond the First World War. This book examines how trench warfare was fought, studying the Crimea, American Civil War and Japanese War 1904-05. He looks at how the Western Front of 1914–18 differed from the trench fighting of the Second World War and the Korean War.The book examines the evolution of trench warfare, technologically and tactically, from the Crimean War to the Korean War, during which time developments in military technology often advanced far beyond tactical thinking. Trench Warfare 1850 1950 discusses the impact of trench warfare on military thinking and considers how the stalemate of the Western Front was overcome. Emergency technologies, from the hand grenade to the tank, are discussed to highlight their impact on trench warfare and, ultimately, on warfare as a whole. Tactically, trench warfare led to the development of the concept of deep battle which was later employed by the Red Army in the Second World War.

Reinventing Warfare 1914-18

Novel Munitions and Tactics of Trench Warfare

Reinventing Warfare 1914-18

New research highlighting the invention of new weaponry and its front-line combat use.

World War I

The Definitive Visual History from Sarajevo to Versailles

World War I

The definitive visual history of the people, politics and events of World War I World War I: The Definitive Visual Guide is a fascinating portrait of a world at war, vividly portraying the conflicts of the Great War on land, sea and in the skies. This history book will tell you everything you ever wanted to know about the First World War. You will uncover the details of the Great War's titanic battles such as Gallipoli, the Somme and Verdun that left an indelible mark on the collective memories of countries and that claimed a generation of young men. Discover how local fears and hatreds escalated into one vast conflict that was fought out to the bitter end. Find out about key battles, political and economic forces, individual leaders and technological advances that influenced the course of the First World War. Timelines show you the war unfolding across countries, providing an overview of developments in all the theatres of war. Packed with images, maps, portraits, key artefacts and unforgettable first person accounts, World War I: The Definitive Visual Guide is an uniquely accessible military history of one of the world's most devastating conflicts.

Kitcheners Army

The Raising of the New Armies, 1914–1916

Kitcheners Army

Numbering over five million men, Britain's army in the First World War was the biggest in the country's history. Remarkably, nearly half those men who served in it were volunteers. 2,466,719 men enlisted between August 1914 and December 1915, many in response to the appeals of the Field-Marshal Lord Kitchener. How did Britain succeed in creating a mass army, almost from scratch, in the middle of a major war ? What compelled so many men to volunteer ' and what happened to them once they had taken the King's shilling ? Peter Simkins describes how Kitchener's New Armies were raised and reviews the main political, economic and social effects of the recruiting campaign. He examines the experiences and impressions of the officers and men who made up the New Armies. As well as analysing their motives for enlisting, he explores how they were fed, housed, equipped and trained before they set off for active service abroad. Drawing upon a wide variety of sources, ranging from government papers to the diaries and letters of individual soldiers, he questions long-held assumptions about the 'rush to the colours' and the nature of patriotism in 1914. The book will be of interest not only to those studying social, political and economic history, but also to general readers who wish to know more about the story of Britain's citizen soldiers in the Great War.

The Encyclopedia Britannica

A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and General Information

The Encyclopedia Britannica


The Encyclopædia Britannica

A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and General Information

The Encyclopædia Britannica