Remembering Corpus Christi

Remembering Corpus Christi

Bay breezes from the Gulf of Mexico sweep into this sparkling city by the sea. The sound of the wind, waves, and shore birds transport harmonic music to the ears of those who walk its beaches and parks. Corpus Christi, Texas, one of the most pristine coastal cities, lies at the mouth of the Nueces River, and from its humble beginnings as a simple nineteenth-century trading post, it has developed into a major city. Farming and ranching, the railroad, port, Naval Air Station, and the oil and gas industry have aided this city in realizing its growth potential. With a selection of fine historic images from her best-selling book, Historic Photos of Corpus Christi, Cecilia Gutierrez Venable provides a valuable and revealing historical retrospective on the growth and development of Corpus Christi. Remembering Corpus Christi brings to life the evolution of this growing community through more than one hundred black-and-white photographs, drawn from a wide pool of topics to depict the history of the people, community, events, and businesses that have shaped this area. The rarely seen images gleaned from several archives provide a unique opportunity to peer into the past and discover the richness of this South Texas city.

Bulwark Against the Bay

The People of Corpus Christi and Their Seawall

Bulwark Against the Bay

After a devastating hurricane in 1919, the people of Corpus Christi faced the stark reality of their vulnerability. It was clear that something had to be done, but the mere will to take precautionary measures did not necessarily lead the way. Instead, two decades would pass before an effective solution was in place. Mary Jo O’Rear, author of Storm over the Bay, returns to tell the story of a city’s long and often frustrating path to protecting itself. Bulwark Against the Bay reveals the struggle to construct a seawall was not merely an engineering challenge; it was also bound up with the growing popularity of the Ku Klux Klan, local aversion to Roman Catholicism, the emergence of the League of United Latin American Citizens, new efforts on behalf of African American equality, the impact of the Great Depression, support for Franklin Roosevelt, and reactions to the New Deal. A case study of a community wrestling with itself even as it races with the clock, Bulwark Against the Bay adds to our understanding of urban history, boardroom and backroom politics, and the often harsh realities of geography and climate.

Housing Act of 1954

Hearing Before ... , 83-2 on H.R. 7839 ... , March 2... 18, 1954

Housing Act of 1954


Housing Act of 1954

Hearing Before the Committee on Banking and Currency

Housing Act of 1954


Hearings

Hearings


Signifying God

Social Relation and Symbolic Act in the York Corpus Christi Plays

Signifying God

First staged as early as 1376, the York Corpus Christi plays were performed annually until the late 1500s and involved as much as a tenth of the city in multiple performances at a dozen or more locations. Signifying God shows how organizing the plays served as a political mechanism for regulating labor, and how theater and sacrament combined in them to do important theological work.

Where Texas Meets the Sea

Corpus Christi and Its History

Where Texas Meets the Sea

A favorite destination of visitors to the Texas coast, Corpus Christi is a midsize city that manages to be both cosmopolitan and provincial, networked and local. It is an indispensable provider of urban services to South Texas, as well as a port of international significance. Its industries and military bases and, increasingly, its coastal research institutes give it a range of connections throughout North America. Despite these advantages, however, Corpus Christi has never made it into the first rank of Texas cities, and a keen self-consciousness about the city’s subordinate position has driven debates over Corpus’s identity and prospects for decades. In this masterful urban history—a study that will reshape the way that Texans look at all their cities—Alan Lessoff analyzes Corpus Christi’s place within Texas, the American Southwest, the western Gulf of Mexico, and the U.S.-Mexican borderlands from the city’s founding in 1839 to the present. He portrays Corpus as a place where westward Anglo expansion overwhelmed the Hispanic settlement process from the south, leaving a legacy of conflicting historical narratives that colors the city’s character even now. Lessoff also explores how competing visions of the city’s identity and possibilities have played out in arenas ranging from artwork in public places to schemes to embellish, redevelop, or preserve the downtown waterfront and North Padre Island. With a deep understanding of the geographic, historical, economic, and political factors that have formed the city, Lessoff demonstrates that Corpus Christi exemplifies the tensions between regional and cosmopolitan influences that have shaped cities across the Southwest.

Remembering Jim Crow

African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated South

Remembering Jim Crow

Published in association with Lyndhurst Books of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Tell About Life in the Segregated South is the "viscerally powerful... compilation of firsthand accounts of the Jim Crow era" (Publisher's Weekly). Based on interviews collected by the Behind the Veil Project at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies, this remarkable book presents for the first time the most extensive oral history ever compiled of African American life under segregation. Men and women from all walks of life tell how their most ordinary activities were subjected to profound and unrelenting racial oppression. Yet Remembering Jim Crow is also a testament to how black southerners fought back against the system--raising children, building churches and schools, running businesses, and struggling for respect in a society that denied them the most basic rights. The result is a powerful story of individual and community survival. Praise for Remembering Jim Crow "A 'landmark book.'" —Publisher's Weekly, "The Year in Books" "This is not just an oral history for the South, but for us all. It is a sobering reminder of the mistakes this nation has made, a hopeful reflection on how far we have come." —Kansas City Star

Things Unimportant, But Remembered

Things Unimportant, But Remembered

This was my daughters idea, one day she said, "Dad, your life has been filled with fun and funny stories, some day you will be gone and we will never hear them." Now you can.