Secret Shropshire

Secret Shropshire

An artistic, photographic and poetic celebration of the beauty of Shropshire. When Houseman wrote of Shropshire, it is where 'the wanderer halts and hears my soul', he knew of the county's power to captivate. A local artist and photographer lead you off the beaten track to reveal their secret Shropshires, capturing unforgettable moments of the passing seasons on the way. Accompanying them are the words of local poets inspired by stunning, award winning images. Wander with them as they reach deep inside the secrets of this beautiful county.

Secret Shrewsbury

Secret Shrewsbury

Explore Shrewsbury's secret history through a fascinating selection of stories, facts and photographs.

Stepping Away from the Silos

Strategic Collaboration in Digitisation

Stepping Away from the Silos

For over twenty years, digitisation has been a core element of the modern information landscape. The digital lifecycle is now well defined, and standards and good practice have been developed for most of its key stages. There remains, however, a widespread lack of coordination of digitisation initiatives, both within and across different sectors, and there are disparate approaches to selection criteria. The result is ‘silos’ of digitised content. Stepping away from the Silos examines the strategic context in the UK since the 1990s and its effect on collaboration and coordination of exemplar digitisation initiatives in higher education and related sectors. It identifies the principal criteria for content selection that are common to the international literature in this field. The outputs of the exemplar projects are examined in relation to these criteria. A range of common practices and patterns in content selection appears to have developed over time, forming a de facto strategy from which several areas of critical mass have emerged. The book discusses the potential to improve strategic collaboration and coordinated selection by building on such a platform, and considers planning options in the context of work on national digitisation strategies in the UK and internationally. Summarises the rise of publicly funded digitisation in the UK from the 1990s to date and identifies the need to improve coordination and content selection criteria Reviews the role of digitisation in government and organisational strategies from the 1990s to the present day Examines the strategic position of collaboration within and across different organisations Identifies common selection criteria and outlines the coverage of exemplar projects Discusses the apparent emergence of a de facto selection strategy and the potential for national strategic planning of digitised content based on existing outputs and improved collaboration

Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths in Shrewsbury and Around Shropshire

Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths in Shrewsbury and Around Shropshire

Criminal cases give us a fascinating, often harrowing insight into crime and the criminal mind, into policing methods and the justice system. They also tell us much about social conditions and attitudes in the past. And such cases make absorbing reading. David Cox's graphic account of 16 notorious cases in Shrewsbury and around Shropshire is a particularly strong and revealing study of this kind. Using newspaper reports, census returns and court records, he reconstructs each case in vivid detail. At the same time he looks into the background of the crimes and into the lives of the criminals, and he describes the methods of detection and the punishments that were imposed. The cases he's chosen range in date from the medieval period to the twentieth century. Included are the case of the forger who had his ear nailed to a post, the father who killed his infant son with vitriol, the transportation of a 70-year-old woman, the murder of an inmate in a lunatic asylum, a twentieth-century highway robber and a VC winner involved in bigamy. The personal dramas David Cox explores in this book will be compelling reading for anyone who is interested in the sinister side of human nature and human weakness.

Subterranean Shropshire

Subterranean Shropshire

Shropshire is not a place usually associated with natural caves, due to its irregular geological positioning. Nevertheless, unknown to many, there are small numbers of explorable cave passages and underground features to be found. Nearly a decade ago, Steve Powell noticed how quickly Shropshire's hidden heritage, or subterranean places, were decaying or being destroyed by various means, either natural or through vandalism, with the knowledge and history of these places passing only by word of mouth. It was with a sense of urgency, therefore, that he started putting pen to paper in what could only be described as a 'travel diary of underground Shropshire'. As with most other counties, Shropshire has its fair share of 'secret subterranean tunnels', most of these having a basis in the imagination of the storyteller, but some, including such features as the ice houses, cave cottages, rock houses, tunnels, mine ventures, underground temples, grottoes and ornamental caves described within, played a major part in variously providing an underground world of housing, food storage, religious sanctity or entertaining eccentricity in times past.

The Little Book of Shropshire

The Little Book of Shropshire

The Little Book of Shropshire is an intriguing, fast-paced, fact-packed compendium of places, people and events in the county, from its earliest origins to the present day. Here you can read about the important contributions Shropshire has made to the history of the nation, and meet some of the great men and women, the eccentrics and the scoundrels with which its history is littered. Packaged in an easily readable ‘dip-in’ format, visitors and locals alike will find something to remind, surprise, amuse and entertain them in the remarkably engaging little book.