A Storm of Swords

A Song of Ice and Fire: Book Three

A Storm of Swords

THE BOOK BEHIND THE THIRD SEASON OF GAME OF THRONES, AN ORIGINAL SERIES NOW ON HBO. Here is the third volume in George R. R. Martin’s magnificent cycle of novels that includes A Game of Thrones and A Clash of Kings. As a whole, this series comprises a genuine masterpiece of modern fantasy, bringing together the best the genre has to offer. Magic, mystery, intrigue, romance, and adventure fill these pages and transport us to a world unlike any we have ever experienced. Already hailed as a classic, George R. R. Martin’s stunning series is destined to stand as one of the great achievements of imaginative fiction. A STORM OF SWORDS Of the five contenders for power, one is dead, another in disfavor, and still the wars rage as violently as ever, as alliances are made and broken. Joffrey, of House Lannister, sits on the Iron Throne, the uneasy ruler of the land of the Seven Kingdoms. His most bitter rival, Lord Stannis, stands defeated and disgraced, the victim of the jealous sorceress who holds him in her evil thrall. But young Robb, of House Stark, still rules the North from the fortress of Riverrun. Robb plots against his despised Lannister enemies, even as they hold his sister hostage at King’s Landing, the seat of the Iron Throne. Meanwhile, making her way across a blood-drenched continent is the exiled queen, Daenerys, mistress of the only three dragons still left in the world. . . . But as opposing forces maneuver for the final titanic showdown, an army of barbaric wildlings arrives from the outermost line of civilization. In their vanguard is a horde of mythical Others--a supernatural army of the living dead whose animated corpses are unstoppable. As the future of the land hangs in the balance, no one will rest until the Seven Kingdoms have exploded in a veritable storm of swords. . . .

Oath of Swords

Oath of Swords

Bahzell Bahnakson, one of the Hradani, a race that is despised for their rages, thirst for blood, and generally uncivilized behavior, runs afoul of the War God and ends up in trouble involving sorcery, demons, and a great deal more. Reprint.

The Connoisseur's Book of Japanese Swords

The Connoisseur's Book of Japanese Swords

Connoisseur's Book Japanese Swords is a Kodansha International publication.

Modern Japanese Swords and Swordsmiths

From 1868 to the Present

Modern Japanese Swords and Swordsmiths

This illustrated guide to the development of the Japanese sword in the modern era concentrates on the techniques and output of the best smiths. It includes a detailed look at the swords used during World War II and should be of interest to collectors and enthusiasts. The lineage of the Japanese sword can be traced back over a thousand years, and throughout its long history the sword has emerged as one of Japan's most durable cultural assets. Part of its mythical appeal lies in the unique harmony of its historical roles as deadly hand-held weapon, embodiment of the samurai

Swords

An Artist's Devotion

Swords

Describes the details of design and history of swords.

Swords and Daggers in Late Bronze Age Canaan

Swords and Daggers in Late Bronze Age Canaan

At the heart of this study of the history of the sword and dagger in Canaan between c.1550 and 1000 BC lies a catalogue of 190 examples, all of which are illustrated. The catalogue supports a detailed discussion of typology. Ten types are identified by their tang and hilt shape as well as their cultural influences from Egypt and the Aegean. A final synthesis considers technological and social aspects of the daggers and swords, usually found as grave goods, such as what they reveal about Canaanite burial customs, metalworking and contact with Egypt.

British Basket-hilted Swords

A Typology of Basket-type Sword Hilts

British Basket-hilted Swords

"Descriptive catalogue with typology of a British sword-type with a 500-year history"--Provided by publisher.

Swords Into Plowshares

Theological Reflections on Peace

Swords Into Plowshares

Roger Burggraeve is professor-in-ordinary at the Catholic University of Leuven, where he teaches moral theology and is chairperson of the Center for the Study of the Theology of Peace. Marc Vervenne lectures at the Catholic University of Leuven in the field of Old Testament studies and serves as Academic Secretary for the University's Faculty of Theology.

Hired Swords

The Rise of Private Warrior Power in Early Japan

Hired Swords

Tracing the evolution of state military institutions from the seventh through the twelfth centuries, this book challenges much of the received wisdom of Western scholarship on the origins and early development of warriors in Japan. This prelude to the rise of the samurai, who were to become the masters of Japan's medieval and early modern eras, was initiated when the imperial court turned for its police and military protection to hired swords--professional mercenaries largely drawn from the elites of provincial society. By the middle of the tenth century, this provincial military order had been handed a virtual monopoly of Japan's martial resources. Yet it was not until near the end of the twelfth century that these warriors took the first significant steps toward asserting their independence from imperial court control. Why did they not do so earlier? Why did they remain obedient to a court without any other military sources for nearly 300 years? Why did the court put itself in the potentially (and indeed, ultimately) precarious situation of contracting for its military needs with private warriors? These and related questions are the focus of the author's study. Most of the few Western treatments see the origins of the samurai in the incompetence and inactivity of the imperial court that forced residents in the provinces to take up arms themselves. According to this view, a warrior class was spontaneously generated just as one had been in Europe a few centuries earlier, and the Japanese court was doomed to eventually perish by the sword because of its failure to live by it. Instead, the author argues that it was largely court activism that put swords in the hands of rural elites, thatcourt military policy, from the very beginning of the imperial state era, followed a long-term pattern of increasing reliance on the martial skills of the gentry. This policy reflected the court's desire for maximum efficiency in its military institutions, and the policy's succes

The Swords of Britain

The Swords of Britain