The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money

The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money

The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, written by legendary author John Maynard Keynes is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This masterpiece was published right after the Great Depression. It sought to bring about a revolution, commonly referred to as the ‘Keynesian Revolution’, in the way economists thought—especially challenging the proposition that a market economy tends naturally to restore itself to full employment on its own. Regarded widely as the cornerstone of Keynesian thought, this book challenged the established classical economics and introduced new concepts. ‘The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money’ transformed economics and changed the face of modern macroeconomics. Keynes’ argument is based on the idea that the level of employment is not determined by the price of labour, but by the spending of money. It gave way to an entirely new approach where employment, inflation and the market economy are concerned.

The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money

The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money

John Maynard Keynes's 1936 General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money is a perfect example of the global power of critical thinking. A radical reconsideration of some of the founding principles and accepted axioms of classical economics at the time, it provoked a revolution in economic thought and government economic policies across the world. Unsurprisingly, Keynes's closely argued refutation of the then accepted grounds of economics employs all the key critical thinking skills: analysing and evaluating the old theories and their weaknesses; interpreting and clarifying his own fundamental terms and ideas; problem solving; and using creative thinking to go beyond the old economic theories. Perhaps above all, however, the General Theory is a masterclass in problem solving. Good problem solvers identify their problem, offer a methodology for solving it, and suggest solutions. For Keynes the problem was both real and theoretical: unemployment. A major issue for governments during the Great Depression, unemployment was also a problem for classical economics. In classical economics, theoretically, unemployment would always disappear. Keynes offered both an explanation of why this was not the case in practice, and a range of solutions that could be implemented through government monetary policy.

The Making of Keynes' General Theory

The Making of Keynes' General Theory

This 1984 book describes the development of thought, both of Keynes and others, culminating in the publication in 1936 of Keynes' General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money. As one of Keynes' close collaborators - from December 1929, when the writing of the Treatise was nearing its completion - Richard Khan provides a uniquely insightful analysis of these events. The author starts with a brief survey of the contributions influential in forming Keynes' early ideas, and moves on to explore the significance of the Quantity Theory of Money, and traces the development of Keynes' attitude towards the theory through his published books. Subsequent lectures are devoted to Keynes' Treatise on Money, and to his more popular writings as an economic adviser which marked the transition from the thinking in the Treatise to that in the General Theory which the author critically examines. The final lecture records the author's memory of his personal relationship with Keynes.

The Economics of John Maynard Keynes

The Theory of a Monetary Economy

The Economics of John Maynard Keynes

The Economics of John Maynard Keynes: The Theory of Monetary Economy by Dudley Dillard seeks to make The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes understandable to both the economist and to the non-economist. First published in 1948 and since translated into over 10 languages, Dr. Dillard’s book has been widely regarded as the seminal scholarship on the monetary aspects of Keynesian economics. In addition to explaining the economic theories of Keynes, Dillard also includes a chapter on Keynes’s philosophical development and the “social philosophy toward which it leads.” Throughout the book, Dillard provides summaries and examines Keynes’ concepts on employment, income, saving, marginal propensity to consume, the investment multiplier, fiscal policy, post-war inflation, interest, and wages.

Raising Keynes

A Twenty-First-Century General Theory

Raising Keynes

Keynes's General Theory has been misunderstood as relying on frictions to justify the need for the visible hand of government to complement the invisible hand of the market. Fleshing out the GT with tools not available to Keynes, Marglin exposes the fundamental failure of markets to self-regulate and draws lessons for fiscal and monetary policies.

Treatise on Money, V2

The Applied Theory of Money

Treatise on Money, V2

This is a new release of the original 1930 edition.

Keynes and The General Theory Revisited

Keynes and The General Theory Revisited

Every time the economy goes through a period of crisis, Keynes’ name is called upon by economists and politicians from diverse backgrounds. However, 70 years after the publication of The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, specialists are still far—maybe everyday further—from reaching agreement about the genuine contents of Keynes’ most important work. This controversy has been marked by a paradoxical turn: it is above all the literature about Keynes which, in the last decades, has imposed the terms of the debate, while The General Theory lacks readers. Accused by both its detractors and admirers of being a confusing book that is inconsistent and even plagued with logical errors, the most important contribution of the most influential economist of the 20th century has been condemned to be forgotten or, at best, to live uncomfortably in the voices of those who have spoken on his behalf. This book is the result of rigorous critical research which reconstructs the spectrum of discussion surrounding Keynes’ main work. The book begins by describing the historical background and the state of the pre-Keynesian economic theory, subsequently immersing the reader in a concise but detailed—as well as innovative— interpretation of the original text. The revision of some of the main interpretative currents prepares the field for the book’s ultimate contribution: the identification of the fundamentals that sustain the analytical structure of The General Theory. At the same time, this exploration of the theoretical fundamentals of The General Theory makes this book an original intervention on the genesis and relevance of the divide between micro and macroeconomics—a division that has been fully accepted by contemporary macro theorists.