The Jail Notebook and Other Writings

The Jail Notebook and Other Writings

Bhagat Singh spent the last two years of his life in jail, awaiting execution. During this time, he and his comrades fought one of the most celebrated court battles in the annals of national liberation struggles, and used the court as a vehicle for the propagation of their revolutionary message. They also struggled against the inhuman conditions in the colonial jail, and faced torture and pain. Their heroism made them icons and figures of inspiration for generations to come.All this is well-known. What is not so well-known is that Bhagat Singh wrote four books in jail. Although they were smuggled out, they were destroyed and are lost forever. What survived was a Notebook that the young martyr kept in jail, full of notes and jottings from what he was reading.In the year of his birth centenary, LeftWord is proud to present his Notebook in an elegant edition. This edition has been checked against the copy preserved in the National Archives of India. The Notebook is richly annotated by Bhupender Hooja; and the annotations have been revised and updated for this edition.Also included are the most important texts that Bhagat Singh wrote in jail, Chaman Lal?s lucid introduction, the New York Daily Worker's reports and Periyar's editorial on the hanging.

JAIL NOTEBOOK OF BHAGAT SINGH

JAIL NOTEBOOK OF BHAGAT SINGH

ABOUT THE BOOK Martyr Bhagat Singh has a very brief period of active political life. In this brief time span he has transcended to the top of a thought process which make him ever relevant to the immerging situations. As these years there is increased interest in him by the common man so there is an urge to have more thorough understanding. The short period of active life also creates a paradox. In absence of thorough understanding of the process of his revolutionary growth, the scope for interpretation of shahid for narrow benefit has been on rise. Thus there is an urgent need to have better understanding of the growth of thought process

War over Words

Censorship in India, 1930-1960

War over Words

Censorship has been a universal phenomenon through history. However, its rationale and implementation has varied, and public reaction to it has differed across societies and times. This book recovers, narrates, and interrogates the history of censorship of publications in India over three crucial decades - encompassing the Gandhian anti-colonial movement, the Second World War, Partition, and the early years of Independent India. In doing so, it examines state policy and practice, and also its subversion, in a tumultuous period of transition from colonial to self-rule in India. Populated with an array of powerful and powerless individuals, the story of Indians grappling with free speech and (in)tolerance is a fascinating one, and deserves to be widely known. It will help readers make sense of global present-day debates over free speech and hate speech, illustrate historical trends that change - and those that don't - and help them appreciate how the past inevitably informs the present.

Violence, Narrative and Myth in Joyce and Yeats

Subjective Identity and Anarcho-Syndicalist Traditions

Violence, Narrative and Myth in Joyce and Yeats

Arguing that art is a form of social praxis, this book examines the capitalist ethos of serial reproduction of objects as one that also produces individuals as serial types. Art as praxis makes possible the reconstruction of one's identity and material environment as irreproducible, unique, and original art texts. Art becomes the tool of a creative process that has both material and spiritual dimensions. In recreating the self and the world as aesthetically unique, original and irreproducible, art challenges the capitalist ethos of reproduction that leads to routine, dissatisfaction and alienation.This theory is rooted in the anarchist intellectual tradition, especially Georges Sorel's conceptualisation of the relations between art, violence and social myth, in which workers are regarded as artisans, artists and activists. Balinisteanu illustrates this through analyses of the ways in which James Joyce and W. B. Yeats, along with key modernist writers and philosophers, facilitated the reconstruction of the social self and social-material reality in a process where political action also became an action of aesthetic creation.

Decolonizing Anarchism

An Antiauthoritarian History of India's Liberation Struggle

Decolonizing Anarchism

Decolonizing Anarchism examines the history of South Asian struggles against colonialism and neocolonialism, highlighting lesser-known dissidents as well as iconic figures. What emerges is an alternate narrative of decolonization, in which liberation is not defined by the achievement of a nation-state. Author Maia Ramnath suggests that the anarchist vision of an alternate society closely echoes the concept of total decolonization on the political, economic, social, cultural, and psychological planes. Decolonizing Anarchism facilitates more than a reinterpretation of the history of anticolonialism; it also supplies insight into the meaning of anarchism itself. Praise for Decolonizing Anarchism: “Maia Ramnath offers a refreshingly different perspective on anticolonial movements in India, not only by focusing on little-remembered anarchist exiles such as Har Dayal, Mukerji and Acharya but more important, highlighting the persistent trend that sought to strengthen autonomous local communities against the modern nation-state. A superbly original book.”—Partha Chatterjee, author of Lineages of Political Society: Studies in Post-colonial Democracy “[Ramnath] audaciously reframes the dominant narrative of Indian radicalism by detailing its explosive and ongoing symbiosis with decolonial anarchism.”—Dylan Rodríguez, author of Suspended Apocalypse: White Supremacy, Genocide, and the Filipino Condition

Echoes of Mutiny

Race, Surveillance, and Indian Anticolonialism in North America

Echoes of Mutiny

How did thousands of Indians who migrated to the Pacific Coast of North America during the early twentieth century come to forge an anticolonial movement that British authorities claimed nearly toppled their rule in India during the First World War? Seema Sohi traces how Indian labor migrants, students, and intellectual activists who journeyed across the globe seeking to escape the exploitative and politically repressive policies of the British Raj, linked restrictive immigration policies and political repression in North America to colonial subjugation at home. In the process, they developed an international anticolonial consciousness that boldly confronted the British and American empires. Hoping to become an important symbol for those battling against racial oppression and colonial subjugation across the world, Indian anticolonialists also provoked a global inter-imperial collaboration between U.S. and British officials to repress anticolonial revolt. They symbolized the hope of the world's racialized subjects and the fears of those who worried about the global disorder they could portend. Echoes of Mutiny provides an in-depth and transnational look at the deeply intertwined relationship between anti-Asian racism, Indian anticolonialism, and state antiradicalism in early twentieth century U.S. and global history. Through extensive archival research, Sohi uncovers the dialectical relationship between the rise of Indian anticolonialism and state repression in North America and demonstrates how Indian anticolonialists served as catalysts for the implementation of restrictive U.S. immigration and antiradical laws as well as the expansion of state power in early twentieth century India and America. Indian migrants came to understand their struggles against racial exclusion and political repression in North America as part of a broader movement against white supremacy and colonialism and articulated radical visions of anticolonialism that called not only for the end of British rule in India but the forging of democracies across the world.

Inquilab

Bhagat Singh on Religion and Revolution

Inquilab

Extolled for his extraordinary courage and sacrifice, Bhagat Singh is one of our most venerated freedom fighters. He is valourised for his martyrdom, and rightly so, but in the ensuing enthusiasm, most of us forget, or consciously ignore, his contributions as an intellectual and a thinker. He not only sacrificed his life, like many others did before and after him, but he also had a vision of independent India. In the current political climate, when it has become routine to appropriate Bhagat Singh as a nationalist icon, not much is known or spoken about his nationalist vision. Inquilab: Bhagat Singh on Religion and Revolution provides a corrective to such a situation by bringing together some of Bhagat Singh's seminal writings on his pluralist and egalitarian vision. In doing so, it compels the reader to see that while continuing to celebrate the memory of Bhagat Singh as a martyr and a nationalist, we must also learn about his intellectual legacy. This important book also makes a majority of these writings, hitherto only available in Hindi, accessible for the first time to the English-language readership.

Outlook

Outlook


Z Magazine

Z Magazine


To make the deaf hear

ideology and programme of Bhagat Singh and his comrades

To make the deaf hear

Includes selections from Bhagat Singh's own writings and other related documents.