The Orthodox Corruption of Scripture

The Effect of Early Christological Controversies on the Text of the New Testament

The Orthodox Corruption of Scripture

The victors not only write the history, they also reproduce the texts. In a study that explores the close relationship between the social history of early Christianity and the textual tradition of the emerging New Testament, Ehrman examines how early struggles between Christian "heresy" and "orthodoxy" affected the transmission of the documents over which, in part, the debates were waged. His thesis is that proto-orthodox scribes of the second and third centuries occasionally altered theirsacred texts for polemical reasons--for example, to oppose adoptionists like the Ebionites, who claimed that Christ was a man but not God, or docetists like Marcion, who claimed that he was God but not a man, or Gnostics like the Ptolemaeans, who claimed that he was two beings, one divine and one human. Ehrman's thorough and incisive analysis makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the social and intellectual history of early Christianity and raises intriguing questions about the relationship of readers to their texts, especially in an age when scribes could transform the documents they reproduced to make them say what they were already thought to mean, effecting thereby the orthodox corruption of Scripture.

Studies in the Textual Criticism of the New Testament

Studies in the Textual Criticism of the New Testament

For the first time in one volume this book presents contributions to the textual criticism of the New Testament made over the past twenty years by Bart Ehrman, one of the premier textual scholars in North America. Including fifteen previously published articles and six lectures (delivered at Duke University and Yale University), this collection will be of vital importance to all students and scholars of the New Testament and early Christianity.

Revisiting the Corruption of the New Testament

Manuscript, Patristic, and Apocryphal Evidence

Revisiting the Corruption of the New Testament

How much did the theological arguments of the church affect the copying of the New Testament text? Focusing on issues of textual criticism, this inaugural volume of the Text and Canon of the New Testament series offers some answers to that question and responds to some of Bart Ehrman's views about the transmission of the New Testament text. Revisiting the Corruption of the New Testament will be a valuable resource for those working in textual criticism, patristics, and New Testament apocryphal literature.

After the New Testament, 100-300 C. E.

A Reader in Early Christianity

After the New Testament, 100-300 C. E.

Revealing the rich diversity of the early Christian movement, After the New Testament: 100-300 CE: A Reader in Early Christianity, Second Edition, brings together an extensive selection of texts from the second and third centuries, both "orthodox" and "heterodox." Selections include the writings of the Apostolic Fathers, the writings of Nag Hammadi, early pseudepigrapha, martyrologies, anti-Jewish tractates, heresiologies, canon lists, church orders, liturgical texts, and theological treatises. Featuring large textual excerpts--entire documents wherever possible--concise introductions, and lucid, up-to-date translations, After the New Testament is ideal for courses in Early Christianity, Christian Origins, and Early Church History.

The Bible

A Historical and Literary Introduction

The Bible

Renowned biblical scholar and New York Times Bestselling author Bart Ehrman has produced his first survey of the Bible. It is authoritative in its scholarship, accessible and interesting to college-level readers of all backgrounds, and full of pedagogical tools.

Jesus

Apocalyptic Prophet of the New Millennium

Jesus

In this highly accessible discussion, Bart Ehrman examines the most recent textual and archaeological sources for the life of Jesus, along with the history of first-century Palestine, drawing a fascinating portrait of the man and his teachings. Ehrman shows us what historians have long known about the Gospels and the man who stands behind them. Through a careful evaluation of the New Testament (and other surviving sources, including the more recently discovered Gospels of Thomas and Peter), Ehrman proposes that Jesus can be best understood as an apocalyptic prophet--a man convinced that the world would end dramatically within the lifetime of his apostles and that a new kingdom would be created on earth. According to Ehrman, Jesus' belief in a coming apocalypse and his expectation of an utter reversal in the world's social organization not only underscores the radicalism of his teachings but also sheds light on both the appeal of his message to society's outcasts and the threat he posed to Jerusalem's established leadership.

The King James Only Controversy

Can You Trust Modern Translations?

The King James Only Controversy

"A thoroughly researched discussion of the development of Bible translations ancient and modern, including key differences between versions such as the New International, New American Standard Bible, and the Authorized Version of 1611"--Provided by publisher.

A Brief Introduction to the New Testament

A Brief Introduction to the New Testament

This book is a concise version of Bart D. Ehrman's best-selling The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, Fifth Edition. Condensing and simplifying much of the longer textbook's material, this volume looks at the New Testament from a consistently historical and comparative perspective.

The New Testament

A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings

The New Testament

Featuring vibrant full color throughout, the sixth edition of Bart D. Ehrman's highly successful introduction approaches the New Testament from a consistently historical and comparative perspective, emphasizing the rich diversity of the earliest Christian literature. Distinctive to this study is its unique focus on the historical, literary, and religious milieux of the Greco-Roman world, including early Judaism. As part of its historical orientation, the book also discusses other Christian writings that were roughly contemporary with the New Testament, such as the Gospel of Thomas, the Apocalypse of Peter, and the letters of Ignatius. FEATURES A uniquely accessible and engaging writing style that vividly brings the New Testament story to life Time lines, illustrations, maps, and more than 100 photos, including three photo essays An extensive glossary of key terms, which appear in boldface type the first time they are used in each chapter