The Political Economy of Competition Law in China

The Political Economy of Competition Law in China

The Political Economy of Competition Law in China provides a unique, multifaceted perspective of China's anti-monopoly law.

The Political Economy of Competition Law in Asia

The Political Economy of Competition Law in Asia

'This is a very timely book which provides an unprecedented analysis of the factors which have shaped the competition law systems of ten Asian countries and Australia. The comprehensive discussion from varying viewpoints against the backdrop of the significantly different environments within which the respective regimes have developed creates a framework for the comparative assessment of competition law systems elsewhere in the world.' Lutz-Christian Wolff, The Chinese University of Hong Kong 'New competition laws have been adopted throughout Asia in recent years, and some of the older laws have been significantly strengthened. This makes Asia a fascinating region in which to look at the political and economic circumstances of the countries in which such laws are to be found, and to consider the very different conditions that exist within them. This book will be an invaluable guide to anyone with an interest in the developing competition law regimes of this immensely important part of the world.' Richard Whish, King's College London, UK This detailed book describes and analyses the essential political economy features that provide the backdrop to the competition policies and competition law regimes of several of the most important Asian economies. The book also discusses the impact of these political economy influences in determining whether the adopted competition policy is effective. Each of the authors experts in their respective countries offer specific insights into the nature and structure of their competition regimes and discuss to what extent the varied political economy factors unique to that country help to determine whether and to what extent the established system promotes or hinders economic competition in that jurisdiction. Comprising wide coverage of Asian jurisdictions, including Australia, this book will strongly appeal to students and academics of law, politics, economics and economic development, policy makers in national governments, international agencies and competition authorities, as well as practicing competition lawyers and in-house counsel.

Competition Policy and Law in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan

Competition Policy and Law in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan

The first book in English on competition (anti-trust) policy and law in greater China Peoples' Republic, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Chinese developments put in context of international developments in completion policy in developing / transitional countries, through international organization- WTO, OECD, UNCTAD. Analysis of legal provisions and literature in each jurisdiction. Explanation of law and policy in the different political and economic environments in Greater China.Theoretical explanation of current position linking the development of successful competition policies with functioning democracy

The Political Economy of State-owned Enterprises in China and India

The Political Economy of State-owned Enterprises in China and India

Focused on unique features of economic development, this edited volume examines the nature and structure of corporate governance of several key state-owned enterprises in China and public sector units in India in five strategic sectors: oil and natural gas, steel, coal, electricity generation, and banking industries.

Economic Analysis of Law in China

Economic Analysis of Law in China

This book is an exemplary multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional study of contemporary Chinese law. A collective effort by a group of European and Chinese scholars, it skillfully tests the relationships between law and economics in the Chinese context. The China Journal This is an extremely valuable collection of essays on modern Chinese law viewed through the lens of the law and economics movement. China is developing very rapidly and law is now understood to provide the essential framework for economic development provided the law itself is economically rational. The essays in this volume are excellent examples of how economics can be used to clarify and guide the law applicable to the essential dimensions of the economy. I recommend it wholeheartedly and without reservations. Richard A. Posner, United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and University of Chicago Law School, US This book brings together important applications of law and economics to China and covers a wide range of issues, including such basic concerns as property rights, intellectual property, and taxation, as well as competition law and corporate and securities law. Because of its breadth of coverage, its focus on the particulars of Chinese law, and the expertise of its scholars both Western and Chinese it should serve as a valuable reference work for years to come. Steven Shavell, Harvard Law School, US This book is an important step toward a Chinese scholarship in law and economics, written by leading law and economics researchers from China and Europe. Hans-Bernd Schaefer, Universität Hamburg, Germany In China everything is different, you cannot apply ordinary economics and the legal framework is idiosyncratic. In the course of time, such statements turned out to be prejudices, and the Eger/ Faure/ Zhang volume makes perfectly clear that, for instance, a law and economics approach can shed new light into the intricacies and complexities of Chinese institutional arrangements. Indeed, China creates new puzzles for economic and legal analysis. On the other hand, however, the Chinese need not invent the wheel anew and they do not try it. The book shows instances where a sophisticated law and economics approach can help to develop the legal framework which is appropriate for the transition from a planned into a market economy. The Chinese economic system is not (yet) a normal capitalist market economy, neither is the legal system adapted to a normal private property economy. Nevertheless the chapters of the book apply fruitfully law and economics theories and thus prove their general applicability. One of the outstanding achievements of the volume can be seen in the fact that it recruited more than half of its contributors with a Chinese background. They learn eagerly western approaches and they learn fast. And, of course, they have no problems with understanding Chinese culture and society. So the book combines most profitably the look from the outside and the look from within with a common theoretical framework. Hans-Jürgen Wagener, Europa Universität Viadrina, Germany This book comprises contributions on recent developments in China from a law and economics perspective. For the first time Chinese and European scholars jointly discuss some important attributes of China s legal and economic system, and some recent problems, from this particular viewpoint. The authors apply an economic analysis of law not only to general characteristics of China s social order, such as the specific type of federal competition, the efficiency of taxation and regulation, and the importance of informal institutions (Guanxi), but also to distinct areas of Chinese law such as competition policy, professional regulation, corporate governance and capital markets, oil pollution, intellectual property rights and internet games. The contributors discuss to what extent the law and economic models that have so far been employed within the context of deve

Liner Conferences in Competition Law

A Comparative Analysis of European and Chinese Law

Liner Conferences in Competition Law

A liner conference, as a self-regulation organisational form of liner shipping companies, constitutes a typical "hard-core cartel" with significant anti-competitive effect. One of the main three trade routes of liner shipping traffic is the Europe-Asia Trade, on the two ends of which both the European Community (EC) and the People’s Republic of China (PRC) play important roles in the international liner shipping market. However, the competition regimes on liner conferences in both jurisdictions are not equivalent. From a comparative point of view, this book reviews the historical development of maritime policy and regulatory legislation in the EC and the PRC, catches insight into the system of regulation regime and individual provisions in substantive and procedural meaning, and finally provides a wide-ranging perspective on the future competition regulation in respect of the latest developments in both jurisdictions.

Chinese Merger Control Law

An Assessment of its Competition-Policy Orientation after the First Years of Application

Chinese Merger Control Law

On 1 August 2008 the Chinese Anti-Monopoly Law entered into force, introducing a comprehensive framework for competition law to the Chinese market. One set of the new rules pertains to merger control. China’s Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) was nominated as the authority responsible for enforcing merger control in China and has been actively doing so ever since. Recent years have established China as one of the most important merger filing jurisdictions for cross-border mergers alongside the EU and USA. This work evaluates the Chinese merger control law regime and MOFCOM’s decision-making practice after more than five years of application. In particular, it assesses which policy goals (competition policy goals or industrial policy considerations) prevail in the written law and its application and provides suggestions for a further improvement of the law – with the aim to develop a transparent merger control regime that promotes long-term economic growth in China.

Building New Competition Law Regimes

Selected Essays

Building New Competition Law Regimes

ÔNearly every important country now has a competition law. It is vital to understand the institutions that drive the operation of these laws. This excellent volume provides case studies of some of the more substantial new competition authorities written by former or current top agency officials and academics closely connected with those institutions. The book highlights the fact that whilst these institutions have certain features in common, they are very much shaped by the history and circumstances of their own countries and cultures, and that any serious prescription for them needs to balance those factors against the general economic doctrines that lie behind competition law around the world. Without that understanding, regulators and those dealing with them are likely to face failure. The book points to ways of resolving those problems.Õ Ð Allan Fels, The Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG) This detailed book focuses on the development of competition law institutions and contains case studies that examine this against the backdrop of the debate around global convergence of competition law and the limits imposed by particular national circumstances. Five of the chapters examine the development of competition law regimes in a diverse range of countries: Mexico, Hungary, South Africa, Thailand (with comparative remarks on South Korea) and Zambia. The remaining chapters examine the role of multinational institutions, particularly the International Competition Network, and the practice of and potential for regional competition law arrangements. The majority of the authors are seasoned practitioners of competition law, all of whom acknowledge the importance of convergence, while simultaneously demonstrating the limits imposed by divergent national circumstances. This carefully edited collection is a companion volume to Enforcing Competition Rules in South Africa, an account of the development of competition law institutions in South Africa, authored by David Lewis and published by Edward Elgar. Building New Competition Law Regimes will be of particular benefit to scholars, teachers and practitioners of competition law. It will also be of interest to development studies scholars, teachers and practitioners and to specialists in the countries that are the subjects of the case studies.