The Rise and Fall of Urban Economies

Lessons from San Francisco and Los Angeles

The Rise and Fall of Urban Economies

Today, the Bay Area is home to the most successful knowledge economy in America, while Los Angeles has fallen progressively further behind its neighbor to the north and a number of other American metropolises. Yet, in 1970, experts would have predicted that L.A. would outpace San Francisco in population, income, economic power, and influence. The usual factors used to explain urban growth—luck, immigration, local economic policies, and the pool of skilled labor—do not account for the contrast between the two cities and their fates. So what does? The Rise and Fall of Urban Economies challenges many of the conventional notions about economic development and sheds new light on its workings. The authors argue that it is essential to understand the interactions of three major components—economic specialization, human capital formation, and institutional factors—to determine how well a regional economy will cope with new opportunities and challenges. Drawing on economics, sociology, political science, and geography, they argue that the economic development of metropolitan regions hinges on previously underexplored capacities for organizational change in firms, networks of people, and networks of leaders. By studying San Francisco and Los Angeles in unprecedented levels of depth, this book extracts lessons for the field of economic development studies and urban regions around the world.

The Rise and Fall of Urban Economies

The Rise and Fall of Urban Economies

"The Rise and Fall of Great Urban Economies" closely examines the divergent economic paths of San Francisco and Los Angeles in order to explain how regions copes with new opportunities and unfavorable shocks. By honing in on micro-level trends in these two cities, the authors make a significant contribution to the dialogue surrounding metropolitan development, urban and regional policy, and comparative economic development more broadly.

Reconstructing Urban Economics

Towards a Political Economy of the Built Environment

Reconstructing Urban Economics

Neoclassical economics, the intellectual bedrock of modern capitalism, faces growing criticisms, as many of its key assumptions and policy prescriptions are systematically challenged. Yet, there remains one field of economics where these limitations continue virtually unchallenged: the study of cities and regions in built-environment economics. In this book, Franklin Obeng-Odoom draws on institutional, Georgist and Marxist economics to clearly but comprehensively show what the key issues are today in thinking about urban economics. In doing so, he demonstrates the widespread tensions and contradictions in the status quo, showing how to reconstruct urban economics in order to create a more just society and environment.

The Tudor and Stuart Town 1530 - 1688

A Reader in English Urban History

The Tudor and Stuart Town 1530 - 1688

The Tudor and Stuart Town brings together many of the most important articles in the field of urban history.

Global Metropolitan

Globalizing Cities in a Capitalist World

Global Metropolitan

The force of globalization is making cities change all around the world. Short's study explores how the discourse of globalization has become a major narrative in the restructuring of cities in many parts of the world.

The Rise and Fall of Marvellous Melbourne

The Rise and Fall of Marvellous Melbourne

With a new preface and epilogue and a collection of picture essays by contemporary writers, this updated edition explores the economic, political, social, and cultural consequences of the economic rise and fall of Melbourne during the 1880s.

Economic Geography and Public Policy

Economic Geography and Public Policy

Research on the spatial aspects of economic activity has flourished over the past decade due to the emergence of new theory, new data, and an intense interest on the part of policymakers, especially in Europe but increasingly in North America and elsewhere as well. However, these efforts--collectively known as the "new economic geography"--have devoted little attention to the policy implications of the new theory. Economic Geography and Public Policy fills the gap by illustrating many new policy insights economic geography models can offer to the realm of theoretical policy analysis. Focusing primarily on trade policy, tax policy, and regional policy, Richard Baldwin and coauthors show how these models can be used to make sense of real-world situations. The book not only provides much fresh analysis but also synthesizes insights from the existing literature. The authors begin by presenting and analyzing the widest range of new economic geography models to date. From there they proceed to examine previously unaddressed welfare and policy issues including, in separate sections, trade policy (unilateral, reciprocal, and preferential), tax policy (agglomeration with taxes and public goods, tax competition and agglomeration), and regional policy (infrastructure policies and the political economy of regional subsidies). A well-organized, engaging narrative that progresses smoothly from fundamentals to more complex material, Economic Geography and Public Policy is essential reading for graduate students, researchers, and policymakers seeking new approaches to spatial policy issues.

An Economic Theory of Cities

Spatial Models With Capital, Knowledge, and Structures

An Economic Theory of Cities

This book is concerned with dynamic relations between urban division of labor, division of consumption and determination of prices structure within a perfectly competitive framework in spatial economy. Our analytical framework examines the issues related to urban dynamics raised in the traditional urban economic theories and provides insights into the issues related to interdependence between knowledge creation and utilization and spatial economies examined by the new urban/regional economic theory. The comparative advantage of our theory is that in providing rich insights into the complex of urban evolution it uses only a few concepts and simplified functional forms and accepts a few assumptions about the behavior of consumers, producers and institutional structures over space.