The Seagull

A Comedy in Four Acts

The Seagull

A masterpiece of modern drama, The Seagull dramatises the romantic and artistic conflicts between four characters: the ingenue Nina, the fading actress Irina, her son the symbolist playwright Konstantin, and the famous middlebrow story writer Trigorin.

The Seagull (Stage Edition Series)

The Seagull (Stage Edition Series)

“Senelick’s accomplishment is astounding.”—Library Journal Anton Chekhov is a unique force in modern drama, his works cherished for their brilliant wit and insight into the human condition. In this stunning new translation of one of Chekhov’s most popular and beloved plays, Laurence Senelick presents a fresh perspective on the master playwright and his groundbreaking dramas. He brings this timeless trial of art and love to life as memorable characters have clashing desires and lose balance in the shifting eruptions of society and a modernizing Russia. Supplementing the play is an account of Chekhov’s life; a note on the translation; an introduction to the work; and variant lines, often removed due to government censorship, which illuminate the context in which they were written. This edition is the perfect guide to enriching our understanding of this great dramatist or to staging a production.

The Seagull

The Seagull

THE STORY: THE SEAGULL is one of the great plays about writing. It superbly captures the struggle for new forms, the frustrations and fulfillments of putting words on a page. Chekhov, in his first major play, stages a vital argument about the theat

The Seagull

An Insiders’ Account of the Groundbreaking Moscow Production

The Seagull

This book is an insiders’ account of the groundbreaking Moscow production of Chekhov's The Seagull directed by Anatoly Efros in 1966, which heralded a paradigm shift in the interpretation and staging of Chekhov’s plays. It is a unique glimpse behind the curtain of the laboratory of new Russian theatre in the twentieth century. Efros' articles about Chekhov and The Seagull, his diaries, interviews and conversations, and most importantly the original rehearsal records combine to form an in-depth account of of the director and his working process. This is an essential book for anyone with an interest in Chekhov and the history of modern Russian theatre.

The Seagull

The Seagull

“Pevear and Volokhonsky are at once scrupulous translators and vivid stylists of English.” —James Wood, New Yorker The Seagull, in this new translation for TCG’s Russian Drama Series, includes lines and variants found in Chekhov’s final version of the play, but omitted from the script for the original performance at the Moscow Art Theatre in 1898, which went on to become the standard printed version. The restored text, a product of the continuing collaboration of playwright Richard Nelson and translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, provides valuable insight into Chekhov’s intentions in his groundbreaking play. Richard Nelson’s many plays include The Apple Family: Scenes from Life in the Country (That Hopey Changey Thing, Sweet and Sad, Sorry, Regular Singing); The Gabriels: Election Year in the Life of One Family (Hungry, What Did You Expect?, Women of a Certain Age); Nikolai and the Others; Goodnight Children Everywhere (Olivier Award for Best Play); Franny’s Way; Some Americans Abroad; Frank’s Home; Two Shakespearean Actors and James Joyce’s The Dead (with Shaun Davey; Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical). Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky have translated the works of Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Nikolai Gogol, Anton Chekhov, Boris Pasternak and Mikhail Bulgakov. Their translations of The Brothers Karamazov and Anna Karenina won the PEN Translation Prize in 1991 and 2002, respectively. Pevear, a native of Boston, and Volokhonsky, of St. Petersburg, are married and live in France.

The Seagull

The Seagull

While my wife, Breda, and I we were on holiday in Portugal recently, a strange thing happened, something that I am still trying to come to terms with, It was a hot day and I was lying in bed, enjoying a welcome rest after a busy few hours shopping for all those tacky souvenirs one feels obliged to bring home and distribute amongst close family and friends, each holiday. The patio door to the balcony was open, allowing a cool breeze into our hot apartment. I was really enjoying the holiday. I hadn’t a care in the world, but then I saw it, a seagull that was staring into our apartment, with its beady, piercing eyes watching our every move. I sat up in bed, gazing curiously at it. The seagull, however, seemed oblivious to how I was feeling, and the fact that he was encroaching on our privacy. “Look,” I whispered to Breda, “see what’s looking in at us.” “It must be hungry. Give it something to eat,” she said impatiently to me.

The Seagull Drovers

Legends of the Land Book Three

The Seagull Drovers

Nothing is right in the Land. King Matthew is indisposed, the city dominated by the malevolent Fang. Crops are dying and even the seagulls have lost direction. Leonardo Pegasus, retired magician, probes the murky depths of the Signal Network, where unseen forces vie for supremacy ... Ashleigh Brown, urban teenager, yearns for the open road, for the gaudy wagon of Wanderer Liam Blackwood ... Charles Bannister, wealthy businessman, plunders the Outer Isles, hunting for secret riches ... While across the Land, roaming bands of Seagull Drovers seek to guide lost gulls back to the coast - who may hold the key to all ills.

Seamore the Seagull

Seamore the Seagull

A red color sun rose lazily out from the Eastern horizon, casting its early dim light upon the calm waters of the ocean Bay marking the beginning of a new summer morning. The warm sun rays slowly mixed with the cool air abandoned from the night before, inspiring a gentle breeze to start blowing towards the land. Seamore, a young seagull, had his head tucked under his warm wing when he first felt the gentle sea-breeze ruffling his feathers. He sleepily peeked out from under his wing at the bright new morning sun and thought to himself, "How good it feels to be awakened by a gentle warm breeze," comparing his thought and memory to some of the cold winter mornings he had experienced in the past. Seamore was perched on the top of an old wooded dock piling where seagulls normally stand or 'roost' when sleeping, he had one of his legs tucked up and pressed against his warm body to protect it from the chilly night air. He then slowly stood up from his perch, shook himself vigorously, ruffling his feathers, stretched his wings out widely, and then gave a loud screeching "SQUACK!" sound from deep within his throat which broke the morning silence, and startled some seagulls across the bay. Seamore was like all the other seagulls you may have seen at the beach. He flew around the Bay most of the day searching for things to eat. But, there was one thing that made Seamore very different from all the other seagulls. Seamore WAS AFRAID OF THE WATER!!!

The Seagull's Cry

The Seagull's Cry

Tansy Trehearn was born and bred in the beautiful and little Cornish port of the village St. Ruthyn, where Martin Wyde was opening a small hotel, The Seagull's Cry. Tansy was falling in love with her employer Martin. She had never been so bewildered, she had met the one man she could ever love, and found that she had to fight her own sister in order to get him. And that was when she learned that the cry of the seagull was no more sad and tortured than the cry of her own heart. Because while Martin and Tansy's love softly flowered, several people were plotting to ruin their newfound happiness.