The Victim in the Irish Criminal Process

The Victim in the Irish Criminal Process

Concern for crime victims has been a growing political issue in improving the legitimacy and success of the criminal justice system through the rhetoric of rights. Since the 1970s there have been numerous reforms and policy documents produced to enhance victims' satisfaction in the criminal justice system. The Republic of Ireland has seen a sea-change in more recent years from a focus on services for victims to a greater emphasis on procedural rights. The purpose of this book is to chart these reforms against the backdrop of wider political and regional changes emanating from the European Union and the European Court of Human Rights, and to critically examine whether the position of crime victims has actually ameliorated. The book discusses the historical and theoretical concern for crime victims in the criminal justice system, examins the variety of forms of legal and service provision inclusion, amd concludes by analysing the various needs of victims which continue to be unmet.

Criminal Justice in Ireland

Criminal Justice in Ireland

Comprehensive overview of the Irish criminal justice system, its current problems and its vision for the future. Collection of essays by major office-holders, experienced practitioners, leading academics, legal scholars, sociologists, psychologists, philosophers and educationalists.

The Routledge Handbook of Irish Criminology

The Routledge Handbook of Irish Criminology

The Routledge Handbook of Irish Criminology is the first edited collection of its kind to bring together the work of leading Irish criminologists in a single volume. While Irish criminology can be characterised as a nascent but dynamic discipline, it has much to offer the Irish and international reader due to the unique historical, cultural, political, social and economic arrangements that exist on the island of Ireland. The Handbook consists of 30 chapters, which offer original, comprehensive and critical reviews of theory, research, policy and practice in a wide range of subject areas. The chapters are divided into four thematic sections: Understanding crime examines specific offence types, including homicide, gangland crime and white-collar crime, and the theoretical perspectives used to explain them. Responding to crime explores criminal justice responses to crime, including crime prevention, restorative justice, approaches to policing and trial as well as post-conviction issues such as imprisonment, community sanctions and rehabilitation. Contexts of crime investigates the social, political and cultural contexts of the policymaking process, including media representations, politics, the role of the victim and the impact of gender. Emerging ideas focuses on innovative ideas that prompt a reconsideration of received wisdom on particular topics, including sexual violence and ethnicity. Charting the key contours of the criminological enterprise on the island of Ireland and placing the Irish material in the context of the wider European and international literature, this book is essential reading for those involved in the study of Irish criminology and international and comparative criminal justice.

Victims of International Crimes: An Interdisciplinary Discourse

Victims of International Crimes: An Interdisciplinary Discourse

In international law victims' issues have gained more and more attention over the last decades. In particular in transitional justice processes the victim is being given high priority. It is to be seen in this context that the Rome Statute for the International Criminal Court foresees a rather excessive victim participation concept in criminal prosecution. In this volume issue is taken at first with the definition of victims, and secondly with the role of the victim as a witness and as a participant. Several chapters address this matter with a view to the International Criminal Court (ICC), the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) and the Trial against Demjanjuk in Germany. In a third part the interests of the victims outside the criminal trial are being discussed. In the final part the role of civil society actors are being tackled. This volume thus gives an overview of the role of victims in transitional justice processes from an interdisciplinary angle, combining academic research and practical experience.

Irish Criminal Justice

Theory, Process and Procedure

Irish Criminal Justice

The Irish criminal justice system is vast, heavily regulated, and intensely litigated. In the last ten years alone, there has been a plethora of new legislation introduced, significantly impacting on the operation of the system. Within the criminal process, fundamental human rights and core interests of the community and society as a whole come into sharp conflict. As an area of study, criminal justice and procedure is complex, challenging, and stimulating. This book provides an accessible yet critical analysis of key themes and stages in the Irish criminal process. It begins with an overview of the theoretical framework of the process and then analyzes key issues from initial arrest to sentence and post-sentencing appeals. Controversial questions - such as police powers, the role of the prosecutor, victims' rights, juvenile justice, and miscarriages of justice - are also addressed in a comprehensive and engaging manner. Irish Criminal Justice: Theory, Process and Procedure incorporates up-to-date developments in domestic legislation and case-law, while integrating the latest developments in human rights law, as they affect the area. The book will be essential for all students of criminal justice and procedure, at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. As a comprehensive account of the Irish criminal process, it will also be a useful resource for practitioners in the area.

New Visions of Crime Victims

New Visions of Crime Victims

This innovative collection presents original theoretical and empirical research on criminal victimization. The first part of the book challenges stereotypical conceptions of victimization, focusing on non-traditional victims of crime, such as male victims of domestic violence, victims of male-on-male rape, institutional victims and the "victim-offenders" who are recipients of IRA punishment beatings. The second part of the volume considers criminal justice responses to victimization. Chapters examine the perspectives of victims who become involved in court, probation and restorative processes. This book will further debate on how we conceptualize victims and their appropriate role in the criminal justice system.

Hearing the Victim

Adversarial Justice, Crime Victims and the State

Hearing the Victim

In recent years far more attention has been paid to victims of crime both in terms of awareness of the effect of crime upon their lives, and in changes that have been made to the criminal justice system to improve their rights and treatment. This process seems set to continue, with legislative plans announced to rebalance the criminal justice system in favour of the victim. This latest book in the Cambridge Criminal Justice Series brings together leading authorities in the field to review the role of the victim in the criminal justice system in the context of these developments.

Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice provides a thorough, thought-provoking and critical introduction to the challenges faced by the UK's criminal justice system. A team of high-profile contributors each present a concise overview of their particular field of expertise, detailing key procedures and challenging students to engage with current and topical debates.

Victims of Terrorism

A Comparative and Interdisciplinary Study

Victims of Terrorism

This book examines the politicisation of victims of terrorism and the reality of the victimisation experience within the broader field of terrorism and the resulting conflict. Victims of terrorism are a unique group of individuals whose experience is overlooked in the current literature on terrorism. Since 9/11, terrorism has risen to global prominence and has become a key topic of interest with regards to media attention and national security. As a result, many European countries (as well as the USA) have had to take active steps to protect and provide for the victims of terrorism, particularly given the nature of victimisation post-3/11 (Madrid) and 7/7 (London). Recently, we have also seen an increase in the political currency of the terrorist victim; for example, the lobbying activities and political involvement of the victims of ETA terrorism and the exceptionally powerful lobby in the USA that sees the involvement of victims of terrorism and their families in policy-making and law-enforcement transformations. This book is based on extensive field work in Northern Ireland, London and Spain and presents the results, which focus on the needs and experiences of victims of terrorism and political violence, and critically analyses these findings comparatively and in their own right. The aim is to assess the provision of support initiatives in Northern Ireland, mainland UK and Spain and understand if victims' needs are being met by these initiatives but most importantly to construct a picture of the local and international interpretation of the experience of victimisation by terrorism. This book will be of much interest to students of terrorism and political violence, victimology, criminology, security studies and IR.

Criminology

A Sociological Introduction

Criminology

Covering all the major areas of the subject, this introduction to criminology features specific topics such as the history and theory of criminology and categories of crime.