The Spirit of Zen

A Way of Life, Work and Art in the Far East

The Spirit of Zen

Here is something quite unfamiliar to the West, something which will appeal strongly to all who are trying to find deeper reality in life than philosophy and conventional religion can express. Historically, Zen is an aspect of Buddhism, but in itself it is so vital and elusive that it escapes definition. To be understood it must be lived. As a way of life it is the highest achievement of the Chinese spirit and the inspiration of its greatest art. Through Zen, Chinese culture reinforms our own with new meaning and offers us altogether new possibilities in a world of change. Contents Include: The Origins of Zen The Secret of Zen The Technique of Zen Life in a Zen Community Zen and the Civilization of the Far East

The Way of Zen

The Way of Zen

The Way of Zen begins as a succinct guide through the histories of Buddhism and Taoism leading up to the development of Zen Buddhism, which drew deeply from both traditions. It then goes on to paint a broad but insightful picture of Zen as it was and is practiced, both as a religion and as an element of diverse East Asian arts and disciplines. Watts's narrative clears away the mystery while enhancing the mystique of Zen. Since the first publication of this book in 1957, Zen Buddhism has become firmly established in the West. As Zen has taken root in Western soil, it has incorporated much of the attitude and approach set forth by Watts in The Way of Zen, which remains one of the most important introductory books in Western Zen.

Each Moment Is the Universe

Zen and the Way of Being Time

Each Moment Is the Universe

It’s easy to regard time as a commodity—we even speak of "saving" or "spending" it. We often regard it as an enemy, when we feel it slipping away before we’re ready for time to be up. The Zen view of time is radically different than that: time is not something separate from our life; rather, our life is time. Understand this, says Dainin Katagiri Roshi, and you can live fully and freely right where you are in each moment. Katagiri bases his teaching on Being Time, a text by the most famous of all Zen masters, Eihei Dogen (1200–1253), to show that time is a creative, dynamic process that continuously produces the universe and everything in it—and that to understand this is to discover a gateway to freedom from the dissatisfactions of everyday life. He guides us in contemplating impermanence, the present moment, and the ungraspable nature of past and future. He discusses time as part of our inner being, made manifest through constant change in ourselves and our surroundings. And these ideas are by no means metaphysical abstractions: they can be directly perceived by any of us through meditation.

Zen

A Way of Life

Zen

Introduction to the background and principles of Zen Buddhism.

The Spirit of Zen - A Way of Life, Work and Art in the Far East

The Spirit of Zen - A Way of Life, Work and Art in the Far East

Here is something quite unfamiliar to the West, something which will appeal strongly to all who are trying to find deeper reality in life than philosophy and conventional religion can express. Historically, Zen is an aspect of Buddhism, but in itself it is so vital and elusive that it escapes definition. To be understood it must be lived. As a way of life it is the highest achievement of the Chinese spirit and the inspiration of its greatest art. Through Zen, Chinese culture reinforms our own with new meaning and offers us altogether new possibilities in a world of change. Contents Include: The Origins of Zen The Secret of Zen The Technique of Zen Life in a Zen Community Zen and the Civilization of the Far East

The Way of Liberation

Essays and Lectures on the Transformation of the Self

The Way of Liberation

Alan Watts helped shape the thinking of a generation through his efforts to introduce and interpret Asian wisdom in the West. This collection of essays and lectures spans his career, from his first essay on Zen Buddhism in 1955 to his final seminar, given only weeks before he died in 1973. The last essay The Practice of Meditation is written and illustrated in his own hand.

The Way of Korean Zen

The Way of Korean Zen

The power and simplicity of the Korean Zen tradition shine in this collection of teachings by a renowned modern master, translated by Martine Batchelor. Kusan Sunim provides a wealth of practical advice for students, particularly with regard to the uniquely Korean practice of hwadu, or sitting with questioning. An extensive introduction by Stephen Batchelor, author of Buddhism without Beliefs, provides both a biography of the author and a brief history of Korean Zen.

The Way of Zen

The Way of Zen


Zen in Japanese Art

A Way of Spiritual Experience

Zen in Japanese Art