The Way to the Spring

Life and Death in Palestine

The Way to the Spring

From an award-winning journalist, a brave and necessary immersion into the everyday struggles of Palestinian life Over the past three years, American writer Ben Ehrenreich has been traveling to and living in the West Bank, staying with Palestinian families in its largest cities and its smallest villages. Along the way he has written major stories for American outlets, including a remarkable New York Times Magazine cover story. Now comes the powerful new work that has always been his ultimate goal, The Way to the Spring. We are familiar with brave journalists who travel to bleak or war-torn places on a mission to listen and understand, to gather the stories of people suffering from extremes of oppression and want: Katherine Boo, Ryszard Kapuściński, Ted Conover, and Philip Gourevitch among them. Palestine is, by any measure, whatever one's politics, one such place. Ruled by the Israeli military, set upon and harassed constantly by Israeli settlers who admit unapologetically to wanting to drive them from the land, forced to negotiate an ever more elaborate and more suffocating series of fences, checkpoints, and barriers that have sundered home from field, home from home, this is a population whose living conditions are unique, and indeed hard to imagine. In a great act of bravery, empathy and understanding, Ben Ehrenreich, by placing us in the footsteps of ordinary Palestinians and telling their story with surpassing literary power and grace, makes it impossible for us to turn away.

The Road to the Spring

Collected Poems of Mary Austin

The Road to the Spring

The Road to the Spring is the first book publication of Mary Austin’s (1868–1934) poems. Best known for her prose book The Land of Little Rain (1903), Austin was in fact a poet from the beginning of her career to the end, even though she never published a volume dedicated to her own original poetry. Instead, Austin’s work came to light in collections of poetry and in prestigious journals such as Poetry, the Nation, the Forum, Harper’s, and Saturday Review of Literature, among many others. The Road to the Spring contains more than 200 poems, most of which can only be found in out-of-print books, magazines, and periodicals, and her unpublished manuscripts archived at the Huntington Library. This singular publication includes her original work, poems she claimed to have written with her grammar school pupils at the end of the nineteenth century, and her translations and "re-expressions" of Native American songs, which often diverge greatly from any other known sources. Warren includes an introduction, laying out Austin’s place in American literature and situating her writings in feminist, environmentalist, regionalist, and Native American contexts. He also includes notes for those new to Austin’s work, glossing Native terms, geographical names, and the ethnological sources of the Native songs she re-creates.

And That's the Way It Was

A True Story As Lived in "The Valley"

And That's the Way It Was

And That's the Way it Was is a legacy to her family (daughter, son, and three grandsons and many nieces and nephews) as told by Florence Baltimore McDaniels. The intent is to tell how a family that had little material things and wealth functioned and worked together to make a happy home. The family was poor but the children didn't realize that they were because they had the most important necessity-love. There were a lot of family-oriented activities, fun and games, and wholesome activities that stimulated a desire to learn and excel in everything that was done. Lessons learned are instilled in behaviors such as trustworthiness, obedience versus disobedience, doing one's part, sharing the responsibilities, caring for each other, and respecting one's parents and siblings. It is very important that every individual knows how to spend one's spare time. One should have a hobby or develop a skill to hone in on when alone or when you need time to one's self and to reflect on one's inner strength. Continue to take on new skills and acquire new knowledge that will enhance and stimulate the mind. Try to keep up with current events and be aware of how changes in government and community will affect you. When making decisions always try to make choices with which you can live. It's all right to take chances, but remember that you must live with the consequences. And remember that no one is perfect. We all make mistakes; but once we make a mistake, try not to repeat that same mistake again. An intelligent person learns from his/her mistakes. That is how we grow and gain self confidence.

Forcing the Spring

Inside the Fight for Marriage Equality

Forcing the Spring

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Washington Post Best Book of the Year (Nonfiction) A Kirkus Best Book of the Year “[A] riveting legal drama, a snapshot in time, when the gay rights movement altered course and public opinion shifted with the speed of a bullet train...Becker's most remarkable accomplishment is to weave a spellbinder of a tale that, despite a finale reported around the world, manages to keep readers gripped until the very end.”-The Washington Post A tour de force of groundbreaking reportage by Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Jo Becker, Forcing the Spring is the definitive account of five remarkable years in American civil rights history: when the United States experienced a tectonic shift on the issue of marriage equality. Beginning with the historical legal challenge of California's ban on same-sex marriage, Becker expands the scope to encompass all aspects of this momentous struggle, offering a gripping behind-the-scenes narrative told with the lightning pace of the greatest legal thrillers. For nearly five years, Becker was given free rein in the legal and political war rooms where the strategy of marriage equality was plotted. She takes us inside the remarkable campaign that rebranded a movement; into the Oval Office where the president and his advisors debated how to respond to a fast-changing political landscape; into the chambers of the federal judges who decided that today's bans on same-sex marriage were no more constitutional than previous century's bans on interracial marriage; and into the mindsets of the Supreme Court judges who decided the California case and will likely soon decide the issue for the country at large. From the state-by state efforts to win marriage equality at the ballot box to the landmark Supreme Court case that struck down a law that banned legally married gay and lesbian couples from receiving federal benefits, Becker weaves together the political and legal forces that reshaped a nation. Forcing the Spring begins with California's controversial ballot initiative Proposition 8, which banned gay men and lesbians from marrying the person they loved. This electoral defeat galvanized an improbable alliance of opponents to the ban, with political operatives and Hollywood royalty enlisting attorneys Ted Olson and David Boies—the opposing counsels in the Supreme Court’s Bush v. Gore case—to join together in a unique bipartisan challenge to the political status quo. Despite initial opposition from the gay rights establishment, the case against Proposition 8 would ultimately force the issue of marriage equality all the way to the Supreme Court, transforming same-sex marriage from a partisan issue into a modern crisis of civil rights. Shuttling between the twin American power centers of Hollywood and Washington—and based on access to all the key players in the Justice Department and the White House—Becker offers insider coverage on the true story of how President Obama “evolved” to embrace marriage equality. What starts out as a tale of an epic legal battle grows into the story of the evolution of a country. Becker shows how the country reexamined its opinions on same-sex marriage, an issue that raced along with a snowballing velocity which astounded veteran political operatives. Here is the ringside account of this unprecedented change, the fastest shift in public opinion ever seen in modern American politics. Clear-eyed and even-handed, Forcing the Spring is political and legal journalism at its finest, offering an unvarnished perspective on the extraordinary transformation of America and an inside look into the fight to win the rights of marriage and full citizenship for all. From the Hardcover edition.

The Way to Do Good

Or, the Christian Character Mature

The Way to Do Good


Blood of the Prophets

Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows

Blood of the Prophets

The massacre at Mountain Meadows on September 11, 1857, was the single most violent attack on a wagon train in the thirty-year history of the Oregon and California trails. Yet it has been all but forgotten. Will Bagley’s Blood of the Prophets is an award-winning, riveting account of the attack on the Baker-Fancher wagon train by Mormons in the local militia and a few Paiute Indians. Based on extensive investigation of the events surrounding the murder of over 120 men, women, and children, and drawing from a wealth of primary sources, Bagley explains how the murders occurred, reveals the involvement of territorial governor Brigham Young, and explores the subsequent suppression and distortion of events related to the massacre by the Mormon Church and others.

Life Experiences and Recolledctions of Mary Basits Kuhns

Life Experiences and Recolledctions of Mary Basits Kuhns

This book is the life and times of Mary Basits Steinhauer from her birth in 1899 to her death in 1989. Mary sat down at age 85 years old and typed out over 200 pages (single spaced)of memories relating to her life. Following her death, her son, Bradley W. Kuhns put the pages into a book. He used all the same typos, and grammar errors that she had put down on paper so as to no take away from her authentic writings. It is worth reading the life of this wonderful ladies trials and tribulation as described by her through her eyes and writing.

The Road to Benguela

The Road to Benguela

A fictional narrative recounted through time by a boy tracing his family's search for acceptance, safety, and stability across three continents from 1880 to the present. It is a touching story of wondering, a tale of our innate need to be different yet the same as those around us, to somehow blend in with our surroundings while not losing our sense of uniqueness and individuality. The narrator, a nameless boy from an immigrant family, finds himself caught up in the tides of political struggle, forced to watch as his family, community, and country are torn apart by the tyranny of Apartheid. Through events beyond his control, he is swept from Africa to a new land and compelled to confront his own individuality, while trying to find acceptance from others for his own deep secrets.

The Explorer's Guide to Death Valley National Park, Second Edition

The Explorer's Guide to Death Valley National Park, Second Edition

Originally published in 1995, soon after Death Valley National Park became the fifty-third park in the U.S. park system, The Explorer’s Guide to Death Valley National Park was the first complete guidebook available for this spectacular area.Now in its second edition, this is still the only book that includes all aspects of the park. Much more than just a guidebook, it covers the park’s cultural history, botany and zoology, hiking and biking opportunities, and more. Information is provided for all of Death Valley’s visitors, from first-time travelers just learning about the area to those who are returning for in-depth explorations.Rewritten, reorganized, and revised, the book includes updated point-to-point logs for every road within and around the park, as well as new maps more accurate than those in any other publication. With extensive input from National Park Service resource management, law enforcement, and interpretive personnel, as well as a thorough bibliography for suggested reading, The Explorer’s Guide to Death Valley National Park, Second Edition is the most up-to-date, accurate, and comprehensive guide available for this national treasure.