Toronto

The Way We Were

Toronto

For decades Toronto historian Mike Filey has regaled readers with stories of the city’s past through its landmarks, neighbourhoods, streetscapes, social customs, pleasure palaces, politics, sporting events, celebrities, and defining moments. Now, in one lavishly illustrated volume, he serves up the best of his meditations on everything from the Royal York Hotel, the Flatiron Building, and the Necropolis to Massey Hall, the Palais Royale, and the Canadian National Exhibition, with streetcar jaunts through Cabbagetown, the Annex, Rosedale, and Little Italy and trips down memory lane with Mary Pickford, Glenn Miller, Bob Hope, and Ed Mirvish. Filey recounts in vivid detail the devastation of city disasters such as Hurricane Hazel and the Great Fire of 1904 and spins yarns about doughnut shops old and new, milk deliveries by horse, swimming at Lake Ontario’s beaches, Sunday blue laws, and how both World Wars affected Torontonians.

Toronto Noir

Toronto Noir

“Stories of murder, passion, betrayal . . . grounded very firmly and specifically in Toronto—Dundas Square, The Beach, Dufferin Mall, Yorkville, etc.” —BlogTO A multicultural nexus, Toronto hosts Indian, Portuguese, African, Italian, and Chinese communities that provide fertile backdrops for crimes of passion and perfidy. Toronto Noir proves that Ontario’s clean-cut capital hides an underworld of sin, scandal, and everyday evil. This anthology features stories by RM Vaughan, Nathan Sellyn, Ibi Kaslik, Peter Robinson, Heather Birrell, Sean Dixon, Raywat Deonandad, Christine Murray, Gail Bowen, Emily Schultz, Andrew Pyper, Kim Moritsugu, Mark Sinnett, George Elliott Clarke, Pasha Malla, and Michael Redhill. “With the help of some very skilled local writers, they’ve shown Toronto Noir is no oxymoron . . . Our authors also come up with rattling good and dark yarns from such yuppie hangouts as the Beach, Bloor West Village and the Distillery District.” —Toronto Reads “The collection by no means neglects the multi-racial, multi-ethnic character of the new Toronto . . . a most successful anthology.” —ReviewingTheEvidence.com

Planning Politics in Toronto

The Ontario Municipal Board and Urban Development

Planning Politics in Toronto

The Ontario Municipal Board is an independent provincial planning appeals body that has wielded major influence on Toronto’s urban development. In this book, Aaron A. Moore examines the effect that the OMB has had on the behavior and relationships of Toronto’s main political actors, including city planners, developers, neighbourhood associations, and local politicians. Moore’s findings draw on a quantitative analysis of all OMB decisions and settlements from 2000 through 2006, as well as eight in-depth case studies. The cases, which examine a variety of development proposals that resulted in OMB appeals, compare the decisions of Toronto’s political actors to those typified in American local political economy analyses. A much-needed contribution to the literature on the politics of urban development in Toronto since the 1970s, Planning Politics in Toronto challenges popular preconceptions of the OMB’s role in Toronto’s patterns of growth and change.

The Toronto Maple Leafs

The Complete Oral History

The Toronto Maple Leafs

A complete oral history of Canada’s most iconic team, compiled from interviews with some of the biggest names in hockey, then and now. Eric Zweig takes readers through the storied history of the Leafs through the eyes of their players, coaches, managers, and fans.

Toronto Sketches 6

The Way We Were

Toronto Sketches 6

These are collections of Mike Fileys best work from his popular and long-running Toronto Sun column, "The Way We Were."

Concrete Toronto

A Guidebook to Concrete Architecture from the Fifties to the Seventies

Concrete Toronto

In the sixties, architecture fell in love with concrete. Architecture has since shifted its fondness to glass and steel, and concrete buildings have fallen out of favor and into disrepair. But they represent an exciting era of faith in architecture and technical innovation that has yet to be documented. Concrete Toronto acts as a guidebook to the city’s extensive concrete heritage. Architects, journalists, professors, concrete experts, and even the original architects use a wealth of new and archival photos, drawings, interviews, articles, and case studies to celebrate Toronto’s concrete past.

From Van to Toronto: A Life in Two Worlds

From Van to Toronto: A Life in Two Worlds

This memoir describes a long and unusual life that started in eastern Turkey in 1896 in a house with an earthen floor, and ended in middle-class comfort in suburban Toronto nearly a century later. The author was an eyewitness to the first genocide of the 20th century, a horror in which most of his family was lost. He lived through the first World War and the Bolshevik Revolution that led to the creation of the Soviet Union. He fled from Soviet Armenia, first to Moscow and then to London. From there he went with wife and baby daughter to Toronto, where he faced the task of earning a living during the Great Depression. Caught up in this swirl of historical forces he describes in fascinating detail his remarkable story of survival. And, perhaps not the least remarkable fact of this life, he was over 80 years of age when he began writing his life story. There is much here to stimulate and educate, not only those who wish to know more about the Armenian Diaspora, but everyone with an interest in the human condition as it was experienced in other places and in another time.

The Shiva

The Shiva

Failures in business and marriage tip poor Mooney into a spell in a psychiatric ward. But he has the great fortune of befriending an Indian seer, one of his pals from the casino where Mooney hangs out, who promises to put Mooney's life back together. Dennis is no ordinary Indian seer. For one thing, he's a rez Indian, from right around Winnipeg, just like Mooney. For another, he's a stock picker, and what he sees coming, in the spring of 2008, is the sub–prime mortgage meltdown. So he puts together a consortium of himself, Mooney, and a bunch of Mooney's pals from the world of North End Winnipeg, to pool their savings in a short–selling scheme to cash in on the coming crash. But the so–called "Eisenteeth syndicate" isn't just betting against the market. Mooney and his pals are betting against Mooney's brother Dave: crude, ignorant, maddeningly successful, whose oafish touch turns every business venture into gold. Did we mention their mother has something to say about all this? Like Michael Tregebov's debut novel The Briss, which was a finalist for the Commonwealth First Novel Award (Canada–Caribbean Region), The Shiva is a fast-paced character-driven novel.