Where We Were in Vietnam

A Comprehensive Guide to the Firebases, Military Installations, and Naval Vessels of the Vietnam War

Where We Were in Vietnam

Widely considered the definitive resource on the Vietnam War, Where We Were identifies the name, location and provides a brief historical synopsis of every military installation, firebase, landing zone, airfield, port, signal site, vessel and significant terrain feature of the American war in Vietnam. Additionally, includes a substantial number from the French War as well. Coverage includes all of Indochina. Currently features over 12,000 entries. Also includes an extensive appendix of Vietnam War research and map guidelines/resources.

Marine Corps Tanks and Ontos in Vietnam

Book Two – 1967 and 1968

Marine Corps Tanks and Ontos in Vietnam

Book Two, the second of a three-book series, continues from 1966 in Book One, to cover the action of Marine Corps Tankers and Ontos crewmen fighting the locally-grown Viet Cong, the better armed, trained, organized, and equipped Viet Cong Main Forces, and the North Vietnamese Army Regulars from 1967 thru 1968 in I Corps, South Vietnam. As in Book One, and to continue in Book Three, it features hundreds of personal stories, on-the-spot in real time, interviews of Marines just returning from their fight – all which is framed within the official unit command chronologies and after action reports, including documented “lessons learned”. The maps, personal pictures, organizational charts, and the citing of each Marine who gave his life are, also linked to the Vietnam Wall and to the Foundation’s web site, with volumes of additional information about the Marines who left their sweat and blood in Vietnam battling their communist enemy.

No Cats in Vietnam

The Memoir of a Straightleg Engineer

No Cats in Vietnam

No Cats in Vietnam, the Memoir of a Straightleg Engineer, is a memoir that really was begun as a response to someones suggestion. I swear. I have thought from time to time of writing something longer than a newspaper article on subjects ranging from Vietnam to gun control to Conflict Resolution, but this has seemed a necessary first step. Besides, I can get away with writing about my own life when that might be an impossible task on some other subject. It is good training, as I was told many, many times in the army. Seriously, folks, this is my autobiography, with as many warts as I can stand. I make no claim to be complete or completely honest. This is simply the way the book turned out. There were things I chose to omit, and I know there will be people who will take offense, but that is the way this book has to be. I have gone back in time as far as I could go without resorting to hypnosis to help me recall things that are only shadows. I have actually contemplated doing this, especially to bring back a few hours of my year in Vietnam, but it has not been recommended to me. I leave it at that. Without recounting the entire tale, I should say only that this book is an account of my entire life up until now, with as much accuracy and humor as I can muster. If anyones life is interesting, mine should be; I have been enough places and gone through enough excitement and pain to make it so. Enjoy.

American Heroes

On the Homefront

American Heroes

From the New York Times bestselling author of Heroes Proved, a moving collection of “straightforward, honest testimonials to the courage American troops display on and off the battlefield” (Kirkus Reviews). For more than a dozen years, combat-decorated Marine Oliver North and his award-winning documentary team from FOX News Channel’s War Stories traveled to the frontlines of the War on Terror to profile the dedicated men and women who serve our nation. This time, he follows them from the battlefield to the homefront and finds extraordinary inspiration in their triumph over life-altering adversity. In this new volume of his New York Times bestselling American Heroes series, North describes the courage, commitment, and strength of those who serve—and those who love them. The term “selfless devotion” may be a cliché to many—but not to the men and women on the pages of this book. Their stories resound with bravery, a warrior ethos, and spiritual strength that will encourage us all. Heroes are people who knowingly place themselves at risk for the benefit of others. Since the terror attack of 9-11-01, more than 2 million young Americans have volunteered to serve in difficult and dangerous places. No military force in history has been asked to do more than those who have served and sacrificed in this long fight. They are American heroes. So too are their loved ones here at home. These are their stories.

The 9th Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division, in Vietnam

35 Personal Accounts

The 9th Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division, in Vietnam

The combat engineers of the First Marine Division, 9th Engineer Battalion, risked their lives daily in Vietnam as they cleared the roads of mines, repaired and paved the famous “Highway 1,” disarmed booby traps, built bridges and culverts, and destroyed enemy bunkers and tunnels. Despite their sacrifices and pain, the combat engineers in Vietnam have heretofore largely been ignored. This is the first oral (or other) history of the 9th Engineers, the only Marine battalion formed specifically to go to Vietnam. More than 35 men of the 9th talk about why they joined the Marines and their experiences in basic training. They speak candidly and compellingly about their five years (1966 to 1970) in country. The soldiers also discuss what it was like to come home and get on with their lives.

Texas Aggies in Vietnam

War Stories

Texas Aggies in Vietnam

From its inception, graduates of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, now Texas A&M University, have marched off to fight in every conflict in which the United States has been involved. The Vietnam War was no different. The Corps of Cadets produced more officers for the conflict in Southeast Asia than any institution other than the US service academies. Michael Lee Lanning, Texas A&M University class of 1968, has now gathered over three dozen recollections from those who served. As Lanning points out, “anytime Aggie Vietnam veterans get together—whether it is two or two hundred of them—war stories begin.” The tales they relate about the paddies, the jungles, the highlands, the waterways, and the airways provide these veterans with an even greater understanding of the war they survived. They also allow glimpses into the frequent dangers of firefights, the camaraderie of patrol, and often humorous responses to inexplicable situations. These revelations provide insight not only into the realities of war but also speak to the character of the graduates of Texas A&M University. As Lanning concludes, “these war stories are as much a part of service as is that old green duffle bag, a few rows of colorful ribbons, and a pride that does not diminish. In reality, there is only one story about the Vietnam War. We all just tell it differently.”

They Wouldn't Let Us Win

Jackson County, Alabama, Veterans Relive the Vietnam War

They Wouldn't Let Us Win

For ""They Wouldn't Let Us Win"," Ronald H Dykes did in-depth interviews with fifteen Vietnam veterans from Jackson County, Alabama. In these interviews, the veterans graphically describe the extraordinarily difficult experiences they endured during their tour of duty. Most of them were teenagers who had little idea of where Vietnam was or what the war was about. Yet, they did serve, follow orders, and try to stay alive. When they returned to the United States, though, some of them were greeted with curses and spittle. Perhaps even worse, their peers at home seemed uninterested in their experiences in Vietnam. Despite the horrors of the war and their reception back in their country, most of them do not regret serving in Vietnam. They do regret, however, that the politicians "would not let us win." Dykes' thesis in this book is that readers like himself who were opposed to the war will be convinced that these veterans got a raw deal when they returned home.

Voices from the Vietnam War

Stories from American, Asian, and Russian Veterans

Voices from the Vietnam War

The Vietnam War's influence on politics, foreign policy, and subsequent military campaigns is the center of much debate and analysis. But the impact on veterans across the globe, as well as the war's effects on individual lives and communities, is a largely neglected issue. As a consequence of cultural and legal barriers, the oral histories of the Vietnam War currently available in English are predictably one-sided, providing limited insight into the inner workings of the Communist nations that participated in the war. Furthermore, many of these accounts focus on combat experiences rather than the backgrounds, belief systems, and social experiences of interviewees, resulting in an incomplete historiography of the war. Chinese native Xiaobing Li corrects this oversight in Voices from the Vietnam War: Stories from American, Asian, and Russian Veterans. Li spent seven years gathering hundreds of personal accounts from survivors of the war, accounts that span continents, nationalities, and political affiliations. The twenty-two intimate stories in the book feature the experiences of American, Chinese, Russian, Korean, and North and South Vietnamese veterans, representing the views of both anti-Communist and Communist participants, including Chinese officers of the PLA, a Russian missile-training instructor, and a KGB spy. These narratives humanize and contextualize the war's events while shedding light on aspects of the war previously unknown to Western scholars. Providing fresh perspectives on a long-discussed topic, Voices from the Vietnam War offers a thorough and unique understanding of America's longest war.

The River Rats of Vietnam

The River Rats of Vietnam

The book was written to give the forgotten River Rats a voice. They played such an important role during the entire US involvement in Vietnam. We hope this book gives not only the returning Rats some pease, but also the loved ones of those who didn't.

Angels in Vietnam: Women Who Served

Angels in Vietnam: Women Who Served

Cry, laugh, and share women’s Vietnam war experiences in their own words in this collection of stories, poems, and pictures of the Women Who Served. Over 11,000 women from America, New Zealand, and Australia went to Vietnam as nurses, American Red Cross workers, physical therapists, entertainers, librarians, and more.Ride along in a helicopter on a Christmas Day mission of the heart with Army pilots and American Red Cross Donut Dollies, in Vietnam, 1969. Meet Gary’s angel, a physical therapist who a wounded soldier found over three decades later to tell her, “thank you.” Take a trip back to the war with a woman when she finds her true love, a soldier fighting in Nam. Experience the war through a nurse’s eyes. Learn where the veterans are today. Read about the Australians and New Zealanders who served in Vietnam. Find out why male Vietnam veterans think the women who nursed, comforted, entertained, or just talked with them were Angels in Vietnam.Forward by David Hackworth, author of About Face and Steel My Soldiers’ Hearts.Jan Hornung is the author of This Is The Truth As Far As I Know, I Could Be Wrong and KISS the Sky: Helicopter Tales. www.geocities.com/vietnamfront